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INTERNATIONAL 


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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Monday, February 7, 1994 


No. 34,505 



Clinton Urges Peace Push 




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By Fomgners and Curb 
Activities of Churches 

Canpikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

_ BEUING — ina niw crackdown otrrcfigjon. 
Owe. on Sunday banned prosejytiang by for- 
eigners and forbade churches to engage in wiiat 
it called destructive, independent, unautho- 
rised or overseas-financed activities. ; 

Two cabinet decrees signed into lawby 
Prime Minister Li Peng shaqjhr increased stat e 
controls on Chinese sod foreign religious ad- 
herents. The decrees, signed an Jan. 31, lode 
effect upon publication on Sunday in Loral 
Daily. 

The iDeasnrescome at a sensitive iinw. for 
: China, which is innder pressure from the XJnited 
States lo showTU^ wemen t in its human ri ghts 
to preserve tariff advantages under most-fa- 
vored -nation trading status. 

’• _ Beying also wants to gain diplomatic recog- 
nition from the Vatican and hopes for a visit by 
.the Pope. - ’ • 

Fonagn evangelists distributing Bibles and 
rc^gious ma terials have long beat a target of 
Chinese security officers. And riots sparked by 
foreign-pubBshed books deemed offensive by 
China’s Muslim minority have alarmed the au- 
thorities. • - . 

Although freedom of- religion is guaranteed 
by the constitution, the Communist govern- 
ment has waged a constant campaign to pre- 
vent the qneadpig.of a U faiths and to Emit 
contacts between domestic and foreign reli- 
gious organizations. . 

Well aware of the important role played by 
the church in the collapse of communism in 
Eastern Europe, the Chinese authorities have 
' increased ndtgkms repression- — indodingtor- 
. ture and detention of behesrers ~ since early 
1992, according to international buh^ih rigfrts 
organizations. 

Analysts said the pew crackdown reflected 
part>' concern that statc^sanctibned religious . 
institutions . * — -China’s . official Itodrihist,. 
Daoist, Protestant, Roman' Catholic mid Islam- 
ic churches — were .losing their grip oa the 
Chinese. .. y '■ S" *•••;...• ■' 
China rqoressed religions Icma before Jbc 
. . - - ; Comtmiiiists.toak power in. iMkTareign ims^ 

.. . . jl sonaries wae^se^for.c^nturie^^^enU czf .... 

_ r . Western was 

. • .It 197& that official dtunaea were afiersred.' to 
-reopen* ptpvided .ilsey actedas “patriotic" 

. - boosters of conmninisai, free ctf fonagninfln- 

. ■ c cnee. •* 

. - - The new rutessharply proscribc idigious . 

■ activities by foreigners ami ethnmCbinesofrom 

Hong Kong. Taiwan, Macao and overseas, al- 
thix^tl^ guarantee^ the right of forcigneisto 
. ' "J'J hold private services for themselves only. * " ' 

Foreigners “must not establish religious or- 
ganizations, organs for managing reHgkws af- 
fairs or centers or schools for refigtoossetirity." 
said Order No. 144, entitled “Rides far man- 
agement of foreigners’ religious activities.” 
They are forbidden to "recruit trifigfous fd- 
towisrs, appoint religious teachers or conduct 
any other proselytizing activities among the 
Chinese people,” it said.- 
. foreigners may preach in China only .with " 
provincial or central jpjvammcnt approval. Vi- 


U10MI 

wien * 



After 68 Die in Sarajevo 


UN Says It Isn't Certain 
Who Fired Fatal Round 


SJH/* 

lf£ — v ; •• n-« 

Ewdo Hanmrhc’fltBUn 

A man wounded in the mortar attack being evacuated Sunday by UN forces in Sarajevo. 


By John Pomfret 

Washington Pest Senior 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — 
United Nations officials said Sunday that 
they had no conclusive evidence that [he 
120mm mortar round chat crashed imo the 
middle of the Old Town’s market here, kilting 
68 people, was fired by the Bosnian Serbs. 

But the new British commander of UN 
forces in Bosnia, Lieutenant General Sir Mi- 
chael Rose, also said he bad seen no proof lo 
support Bosnian Serb claims that Muslim 
forces had killed their own people — in 
Saturday's calamity or in previous ones. 

“The world wfll draw its own conclusions." 
General Rose said, observing that the mortar 
round “did exactly the same damage" as 
another volley' fired’ Friday afternoon at a line 
of people waiting for food UN officials 
blamed Serbs for mat blast, which left at leasi 
eight dead. 

Three United States planes evacuated 
about 60 of the wounded victims on Sunday, 
as well as 120 relatives, to Ramstrin in Ger- 
many for treatment. 

An International Red Cross transport 
plane carrying wounded and family members 
from Sarajevo arrived at the U.S. air base in 
Ramslein at 7:50 Sunday night, an American 
military spokesman said. He said two U.S. C- 
130 transport planes were expected shortly 
afterward, carrying a total of 43 wounded, 
including 34 with very serious injuries, and 79 
members of their families 

The confusion over responsibility for Sat- 
urday’s attack, in which the mortar plowed 
through a thin green corrugated roof onto a 
hawker's table in this crumbling city’s open- 
air market, appeared destined to muddy ef- 
forts within the international community to 
punish Bosnian Serb forces, who are largely 
seen as the aggressors in the war. 

Several UN officials said they believed the 
United Nations was shying away from blam- 
ing the Serbs because of die possibility that 
such a step would spark military retaliation, a 
path many in the UN hierarchy — both here 
. and in the UN headquarters for the former 
Yugoslavia in Zagreb, Croatia — oppose, 

Brigadier General Charles Ritchie of the 
British Army, who is chief of staff of the UN 
opera lion in the former Yugoslavia, rejected 
that idea. He said results of a crater analysis 
determined that the shell was fired from a 
gun 1,830 meters t'2.000 yards) to 3,200 me- 
ters away, “a range bracket that straddles 
both sides.” 


General Ritchie said the fact that the sbell ! 
fell through a thin tin roof and landed first on i 
a table before it bore a hole into the pavement 
complicated the crater analysis, which re- 
quires an unimpeded impact for best results. 
He said the high death toll occurred because 
the shell exploded on the hawker’s table and 
not on the ground. 

“When it hit the table with a percussion 
head, it exploded on contact, spraying shrap- 
nel chest and bead high." the former army 
mortar officer said. “That’s why the effect 
was so utterly disastrous." 

“1 know the world community is seeking 

France to seek NATO ultimatum to Serbs: 
lift siege or face air strikes. Page 6. 

definitive answers," he added, “but you just 
can't say.” 

Prime Minister Haris Silajdzic of Bosnia 
asserted that the attack came from a Serbian- 
gun emplacement in the mountain village of 
Mrkovici. 2,750 meters above Sarajevo, and 
he renewed his call for air strikes and the 
lifting of the UN arms embargo against Bos- 
nia. 

“It is necessary to use power against people 
who kill civilians and stop humanitarian con- 
voys," he said. “I hope that 68 killed and 197 
wounded will not be easily forgotten. This is 
the final proof the world needs that Sarajevo 
is surrounded by Fascist forces." 

Manojlo Milovanoric, chief of staff of the 
Bosnian Serb paramilitary forces, threatened 
to block all UN aid distribution in Bosnia, 
starting Monday, unless UN investigators 
began a joint investigation that would exon- 
erate his forces besieging this city. 

Since the beginning of the UN operation in 
Bosnia, Serbs have accused Muslim forces of 
killing their own people. 

In Sarajevo, a city that has lost about 
10,000 dead and 55.000 wounded to the war. 
there appeared little debate about who was 
responsible. 

“is lucre anyone withthc gnls to point the 
finger at the Serbs?” asked Mohamed Cnsto- 
vic, 45. who was in his cafe around the comer 
from the market when the shell hit and whose 
clothes remained stained with the blood and 
brains of the victims. “Is there any justice left 
anywhere?" 

Burials for the dead began just before sun- 
down — a precaution taken throughout most 
of the besieged parts of Bosnia to dodge 
death in the graveyard. 




Pentagon Plan for North Korea Attack: Take Pyongyang 


olatots face itasperificd punishment, it add. 

- Order JNa 145 bans imdergrpund “boose" 
churches and other unauthorizedplaocs of wor- 
ship, winch have spread across Cnm a in xecait 
years. , It also pats strict Emits on what goes on 
chu rches, which in many cases have been 
Hocused of harboring political dSssidcpts-aaid 
even fomenting ' insurrection. 

In 1992, officials' put the number cil Protest 
tanis arid Catholics attending state-approved 
churches at 'about 8 nriffion and growing by a 
raiHin p each year, vidrile acknowledging that the 
number of “secret” worshippers was far higher. 
. ,, ....... (Reuters, AFP) 


TSy Michael R. Gordon 
: and David E. Sanger 

?tew York Tins Service 

PANMUNJOM, Korea — - While the world 
is focused on North Korea’s program to devd- 
op nuclear weapons, an equally serums buildup 
in convontiCBuit troops and equipment in the 
North has prompted American, military com- 
mandds-to Overhaul their plans for defending 
South Korea. 

- : ha die. last year, North Korea has used its 
huge array of artiOety and troops near tins 
heavily fortified border to try to intimidate the 
Umted States and its Asian allies from dealing 
. too sternly with it on its nuclear-weapons plans. 

American military commanders say the com- 
binatiori ofthe North’s nudear program, con- 
venticfflatamB buildup rod concentration, of 


forces near Seoul and the South's vital econom- 
ic centers has made Pyongyang the paramount 
threat f or the Pentagon. 

“North Korea w3I be the critical, major mili- 
tary threat for the next few years.” said Lieu- 
tenant General James R. Dapper, the bead of 
the Defense Intelligence Agency. 

That threat, and other military and political 
developments, have led American commanders 
to revise ihdr approach, in the event of a North 
Korean attack on the South. 

Rather than simply driving the. North’s 
troops from Sooth Korea, the new plan pro- 
vides for a fierce counteroffensive intended to 
seize the North's capital, Pyongyang, in the 
hope of toppling the government of Kim D 
Sung. American officials said. 

The administration has also confirmed that it 
is planning to send Patriot anti-missile systems 


to help protect South Korean airfields and 
ports from North Korean missiles. 

The commander or United States forces in 
Korea. General Gary E. Luck, has requested 
still other steps in the event that the negotia- 
tions over inspections of the North’s nudear 
sites break down and Washington and its allies 
impose economic sanctions. 

The North has said it would consider sanc- 
tions an "act of war." 

Even if the nuclear issue were settled and the 
immediate crisis defused, the threat to the 
South would remain. Reflecting its concern, the 
Pentagon is pressing for a diplomatic initiative 
to persuade Pyongyang to move its artillery and 
forces back from the front lines in exchange for 
alomauc recognition. 

w — >ite Wasfimgton's planning, the steadily 
; threat has led to a broad debate over 


whether the Clinton administration is being 
forceful enough with the North Koreans and is 
taking adequate military precautions. 

Brent Scowcroft, who was national security 
adviser to President George Bush, said the 
Chmon administration should consider moving 
an aircraft carrier lo the region and deploying 
more fighter planes there. 

“I would be ostentatiously strengthening my 
position,” he said. 

Much of the North Korean force consists of 
older weapons, but with a strength of 1.2 mil- 
lion, the North Korean military is enormous 
and outnumbers the allied forces in South Ko- 
rea by about 2 to 1. 

In recent months, the North has taken steps 
to camouflage the planes it would use to drop 

See KOREA, Page 6 



-of- War: Idealism vs. Profits 


By Thomas L. Friedman 

- itew York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — the tag^aigunwots 
over f Blfttirms with Vietnam and China are at 
the core of 'a sharpening debate in American 
Forei gn policy. In a world where every nation’s 
mottois lKW - Btpb^wDie, , * v*ere should 
Umted States draw the Kne between its desire 
to export KsValMS and iis iaaeariitg requ^o- 
am jo export its goods? . 

Dming the Cold War, thfc main debate was 
between idealists who argued that relations 
with other countries should depend c® tbar 
human-rights records and realists who a^goed 
that America could not afford. nriHtanWjo. 
isolate dictatorships to such places as the Fhu- 
‘ i of frail because tbrir support was oeed- 


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Today, the idealists are suD adyocatmg to- 
man riritte. Btu^ ^findmg 

themselves debating ttot with,hawtosh ^mrals, 

bat with Gcncral Becmc Co. md-Cocral 
Mofios Carp, who arguediat the UmtcdSrates 
cannotaHtird ecoDomicaBy to isctotethe.fast- 
esi growing ecmiwnies, Kke ihoMmQm»4tid 

Vietnam. 

Time me still security considerations, oat 
increasingly the thrust of the debate m foragn 
policy -today is economics versus htman 

Mawts tflBd Prices _ 

LuxefrixwrsWL.Fr 

Morocco-. — 
Qatar— -3*00 RKds 
Santon.-imFF 
Saudi Arabia _9J0 ft. 
Senegal^-VMOCFA 

Spain — JSOOPT^ 

Tunisto -.1-000 Dto 
TSrtw..T.L. 12*000 
UAE--- 8 ^ 0 Dirft 
UJS.Mfl. (Eur.) Sl-10 


rights,’’ said Winston Lord, assistant secretary 
' of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs. 

’‘TVheaTwas working for Henry Kisringer in 
the 1970s; I raided to meet with drink-tankers 
and acadehpcs ? 'puttfy oat pofitical-security is- 
sues,” htsaid. “Today, 1 find mys^ goring from 

Tffi^AmYSB' 

a meeting with Amne8ty TntemalKawl or Asia 
Watch In the morning to onewifli the Chamber 
of Commeire in the afternoon. That is where 
the big divide is. 1 think we can promoie the 
interests 'of. both. .But dearly in the short ran 
there are romethnes tin«h ttadpoffs." 

- kfike Jtaadizgt^tiieWaihington director 
of the human-rights ocgtmiza&m Asia Watch, 
says he also haa seen the change: “In the old 
days, when Chinese or Indonesian dissidents 


came to the Slates 1 would only bring them to 
Ccmgress or the Stale Department. Now, I try 
to arrange appointments for them to talk to 
business people. Sometimes the bittiness people 
'agree; sometimes they don't. But many of them 
now feel they really have a stake in how the 
human-rights debate plays out. This is all very 
recent" 

What has recast this debate? It is all in the 
numbers. 

In 1970, U.S. merchandise exports were 4.2 

di&cbnport$ were 3.9 perccnt/Now merchan- 
dise exports arc 12 percent of GNP and im- 
ports 9-3 percent. 

Labor Department statistics indicate that 
U.S. jobs related to exports pay an average of 
20 percent time than those focused exclusively 
.. an the domestic economy. 


Two decades ago, virtually no Americans 
made a living from trade with China. Today, 
200,000 Americans arc employed in the sale of 
S9 billion worth of products a year there, in- 
cluding 14 percent of the sales of Boeing Co. 
airmail Millions more depend on low-cost Chi- 
nese shirts, dresses and swearers to dothe their 
families. 

Vietnam? The potential investment market 
in Vietnam will reach 58 billion in the next five 
years, and include everything from airport con- 
struction to power generation, according to a 
recent report by the UJS.-ASEAN Council 

India. Indonesia and Burma represent even 
bigger potential markets, but arc also nations 
with widespread human-rights abuses. 

It is fitting that President BUI Clinton should 

See POLICY, Page 7 


Andorra FF 
AntUles-....n- 20 FF: 
Gjrneraon~1.430CFA 

Egypt E. P.5000 

• France 9.00 FF 

Gabon ,"960 CFA 

Greece ^..300 Dr. 

Ivory Coast .1.120 CFA 

Jordan.'.-. ~~~-l dD 
Lebanon —USSIJ 9 


Reasonable Grounds 9 Against Skater 


By <&risrtiii& Brennan 

Washingto n Past Service 

LBXEHAMMER, Norway -- The. VS. 
figure Skating Association’s panel investi- 
gate;'' Tonya ranting has nnammoutiy de- 
termined that “reasonable grounds” east to 
bdtevMtel Ms. Haretiqg was involved is or 
knew about apian ut injure het rival, Nancy 
.Kerrigan, ana iua begtUL disaptinary pro- 
credmgs against her.’. . 

Thc proc^f igeHrely woald not affect the 
. figure foqfog chanson’s Ctiynqric sta- 
tus. Bn after the -association’s action late 
SAtnrday, the U.S. Olympic Committee 
.catied Z^nms Rawfiosoo, pbe.oS. Ml. Har- 
ding’s attorneys, totefl him fiiat the organiza- 


tion’s Games Administrative Board “is con- 
sidering convening in Norway within two 
weeks to detenmne her status as a member of 
the 1 994 U.S. Olympic Winter Games team." 

That board, shoulditmeet to hear her case, 
could remove her from the Olympic team. 

“We’re gang to do what’s right," said 
Harvey Schiller, the US. Olympic Commit- 
tee's executive director. 

Mr. SdriHer said . his committee had not 
- asked Ms, Harding to withdraw from the 
Olympic team, cvea though sources have said 
for weefe thai that was what the commuter 
wanted her to do. 

{The International Olympic Committee 


was keeping its distance for now. The Associ- 
ated Press reported from liHehammer. 

[The director-general of the international 
comnrittee, Francois Canard, was quoted 
Sunday as saying, “The executive board wish- 
es to express its full support for the U.S. 
Olympic Committee and is confident that the 
USOC will take die wisest decision in this 
matter, taking into account all circum- 
stances.’! 

Ms. Harding made no comment after the 
U.5. skating association's announcement- A 
statement issued by her lawyers said, in part* 

“We stress that in its statement USFSA 

See SKATER, Page 7 


Kiosk 



Alberto Toraba of Italy rkfimg high 
Sunday after bis World Cup slalom 
victory, malting trim No. 2. Page 15. 

Arafat Backs Out 
Of Feres Meeting 

CAIRO fAFP) — Yasser Arafat, bead 
of the Palestine Liberation Organization, 
has hacked oot of a planned meeting with 
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres of Israel 
in Egypt cm Monday because he says 
Israel is holding back on a final autonomy 
deal PLO officials said Sundav. 


Book Review 


Page 15k 


He Says U.S. 
Can’t Act Alone 
In Retaliation 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

Intemalh'KoJ Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — President Bill Oimon. 
citing barriers to military action in Bosnia, said 
Sunday that he hoped "the shock of a deadly 
mortar attack in Sarajevo would spur the war- 
ring factions to negotiate a peace agreement. 

Mr. Clinton said that he had consulted with 
U.S. allies Saturday and Sunday about the 
possibility of retaliation, but he then cited re- 
strictions under international law that would 
prevent uni lateral action. European allies op- 
pose air strikes, be said, for fear that they would 
make UN peacekeeping troops vulnerable. 

In briel remarks on the While House lawn 
after receiving briefings from senior aides. Mr. 
Clinton said American officials would urge the 
United Nations to accelerate efforts to deter- 
mine the source of the single mortar that 
slammed into Sarajevo's outdoor market on 
Saturday, killing 6S people and wounding at 
least 200. 

(JN officials in Sarajevo said that they could 
not determine who had fired the moriar, but 
Mr. Clinton said it was “highly likely” that 
Serbian gunners were responsible. 

Responding to questions. Mr. Clinton reiter- 
ated his frequently staled view that Europe 
opposes an end to the UN embargo on arms 
sales so that Bosnians can better defend them- 
selves, even though Washington favors such a 
move. 

“The appropriate thing to do is to see if the 
shock of this can be a spar to vigorous efforts to 
achieve a peace agreement," Mr- Clinton said. 
The “ultimate answer," he said, is a negotiated 
peace agreement. 

There were no early indications that either 
NATO or the UN Security Council would opt 
for military steps against artillery sites around 
the Bosnian capital or against other Serbian 
targets. 

The president also said his top foreign affairs 
officials would continue to consult with U.S. 
allies. 

Speaking at a security conference in Munich, 
the U.S. defense secretary. William J. Perry, 
said NATO aircraft could be launched within 
one hour of receiving orders for air strikes. 

But be seemed to discount this possibility, 
stressing instead that diplomatic “pressure" 
was needed to encourage negotiations (o end 
the civil war in Bosnia. 

Mr. Perry ruled out unilateral U.S. air 31 - 
tacks. saying that close coordination with Euro- 
pean allies would be required because their 
soldiers made up the bulk of the 28.000 UN 
peacekeepers on the ground in Bosnia. 

Key U.S. political leaders continued Sunday 
to rigorously condemn the shelling. 

Treasury Secretaiy Lloyd Bemsen, in a na- 
tionally televised interview, called the attack "a 
bloody outrage." 

He added. “Some kind of a message has to be 
sent to make them understand that that kind of 
cruelty, stupidity will not be condoned," But be 
offered no hint of the form a U.S. response 
might take. 

Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher 
spoke Sunday with the foreign ministers of 
France, Britain, Canada, Denmark and Spain, 
according to his spokesman, but did not hear 
any unanimity about bow 10 proceed Toward a 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 


A New System 



For Cubans 


By Douglas Farah 

KasAin-rnn Par Service 

HAVANA — A series of once unthinkable 
high-risk economic reforms, coupled with fa- 
vorable world prices for key commodities, are 
improving Cuba's devastated economy and 
rapidly transforming the face of the Western 
Hemisphere’s last bastion of Marxism. 

In the last six momhs. the government of 
Fide) Castro not only has allowed Cubans 10 
use U.S. dollars openly, but also has permitted 
limited self -employment and has increased ag- 
ricultural production by' giving farmers a direct 
slake in productivity. In addition, a growing 
number of foreign joint ventures and a robust 
tourism industry are opening Cuba to market 
forces. 

At the same rime, world oil prices have 
dropped sharply and the price of sugar, Cuba's 
mam export for hard currency, has climbed, 
allowing scarce resources to go further. 

Although no one is predicting a rapid revival 
and the economy, which has been subject to a 
stiff 33-year VS. trade embargo, is still far 
from healthy, Cuban leaders, for the first time 
since communism in Eastern Europe collapsed 
in 1989, say that the economic free fall has 
ended. 

In both this capital and the countryside, 
there is a risible lessening of economic pressure 
and a growth of private enterprises. Because the 
reform measures have not been fully defined 
and the limits not set, much of the "economic 
activity is taking place in a sort of gray market 
of shifting boundaries, in which the dollar is the 
main currency. 

Electricity blackouts have dropped from 10 
hours a day in July to about five hours every 
other day. A few food rations have been in- 
creased. The streets of the capital — filled 
almost exclusively with bicycles and (ouris: cars 
in the past — now have light local traffic 
because, in the last two months, as the price of 
gasoline has fallen and more fuel has become 

See CUBA, Page 6 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1994 


N.Y. Congresswoman Grabs Spotlight and Runs Withlt 


By Paul F. Horvitz 

International Herald Tribune 

STATEN ISLAND, New York 
— Americans love perkiness, and 
the media adore it. especially in an 
upbeat New Yorker who also em- 
bodies that rare combination m 
politics: f eminis t and Republican. 

So it is no surprise that Susan 
Motinari, the perky young con- 
gresswoman from New York’s 
borough of States Island, is riding 
a wave of attention. 

A search through 'the bright 
ether of UJS- media finds the 35- 
y ear-old politician posing in a 
pantsuit for Glamour magazine, 
featured with her fianc& in People, 
labeled one of the most confident 
women in America by McCalls, 
jogging for Runner’s World, pro- 
viding political analysis on CNN 
or sitting in as a guest co-bost on 
the NBC cable talk show “Equal 
Time." 

It would be easy to dismiss the 
dazzle as yet another display of 
flimsy Washington personality- 
building. 

Not so fast 

Ask Goldie Hawn how she went 
from perky TV go-go girl to Hol- 
lywood producer and director. 
Ask Dorothy Hamill how she 
went from poky U.S. Olympic 
figure skater to owner of the Ice 
Capades. 

Then find Susan Motinari in 
her windowless district office. She 
is wearing unadorned denim. The 
contact lenses are out and the 
glasses are on. There is no make- 
up. George, her dog, rests beside 
the red toy fire hydrant 

Mentally, her sleeves are rolled 
up. She talks about various public 
enemies, including New York 
City garbage and the Serbian 
strongman Slobodan Milosevic, 
and she is saying things like: “In 


this business, he who fights the 
fight longest wins.” 

She is already a veteran of New 
York’s Gty Council, is making a 
same for herself in Congress and 
stands today os probably the 
do minant Republican fanale pol- 
itician in New York State. She 
came dose to running for gover- 
nor later this year and leaves no 
doubt that she wants to run for 
statewide office at some point 
When she does run. it is dear that 
there will be no lade of drive. 

Behind her ubiquitous talk- 

An occasional series V 
about the leaders 
o f tomorrow. 

show image is a reservoir of politi- 
cal canniness that already makes 
Miss Molinari formidable on 
many fronts, analysts and col- 
leagues say. Though she may still 
lack seasoning in a rough busi- 
ness. she is viewed as highly capa- 
ble, down to earth and, as a candi- 
date, highly attractive. 

"Susan’s strength is that she is 
not a rigid ideologue,” says Eiiot 
L Engel, a Democratic congress- 
man from New York Gty. She is 
approachable on a range of issues 
that do not always fit the Republi- 
can Party line, he said, and thus 
she coold appeal to voters who see 
themsdves as Democrats. 

Her personality is another as- 
set, Mr. Engd says. “Bubbly and 
forward but not strident,” is how 
he describes iL 

Bob Beckel, a former Demo- 
cratic political consultant who has 
appeared on talk shows with Miss 
Molinari, is a fan. 

"This may be one of the tough- 


est, most resilient people in the 
business," be says. “You can 
make a very tag mistake by as- 
suming that underneath there is a 

marshmallow . It's 1KH SO." 

Her frequent idevison appear- 
ances, Miss Molinari says, are not 
ego trips. 

“It did raise my stature, in poli- 
tics and government," she says. 
“Clearly that is an asset when I 
need to negotiate for my constitu- 
ents. I can appear on the morning 
news shows. That does give me a 
little more leverage:” 

She also gams leverage from the 
considerable political dent of her 
father, Guy Molinari, a savvy 
New York Republican who effec- 
tively willed his congressional sear 

to his only child. Now Staten Is- 
land’s borough president, be acts 
as hex confidant *nd cheerleader. 

Another regular in the cheering 
section is Bill Paxon, the 39-year- 
old Republican congressman 
from outride Buffalo, New York, 
who will marry Miss Molinari in 
July and who vows to be the land 
of supportive mate who will let 
her career flourish. 

Happily for Miss Molinari, hex 
long-odd political positions, par- 
ticularly on crime and taxes, fit 
neatly into the larger political 
treads of the day to the United 
States. 

She calls hoseif “an urban con- 
servative.” 

The death penalty? She is Tor it 
Handgun control? She favors iL 
Abortion rights far women? She is 
for h, despite her Roman Catholic 
upbringing. Stronger laws on vio- 
lence against women? By all 
means. Government spending? It 
must be curbed. New taxes? You 
must be kidding (but a “sin" tax 
an tobacco wouldn’t hurt) 

As for her avowed feminism, 



For Susan Motinari, “He who fights the fight longest wins." 


rite is straightforward: It just 
means ending discrimination 
against women at all levels. 

“Frankly, I find that most men 
are not offended by it,” she says. 
“Every man has a wife, da ug h t e r , 
sister who’s been stricken by 
breast cancer and therefor warns 
the government to do something 
about it, and wants them to fed 
safe when they’re out on a date on 


a college campus and wants them 
to get a dollars wage for a dollar’s 
work." 

In foreign affairs. Miss Moim- 
ari re mains an OUtSpokd critic of. 
the worixfs cautious response to 
avO warm the former Yugoslavia, 
and she is seeking stronger U.S. 
resolve to prevent ethnic demising 
in Kosovo, the Albarrian-doori- 
naied region controlled by Serbia. 


As chairman of the Republi- 
cans’ tiny Balkans Crisis Task 
Faroe, she favorepanith* air 
strikes against Serbian cease-fire 
violators and has called for the 
resignation. of the United Nations 
secretary-general, Butros Butros 
Ghali, in part because she believes 
war crimes are hot being effective- 
ly prosecuted. ■ 

“Our lads and our grantflads 
are going to wonder about tins 
generation of Americans that al- 
lowed tins atrocity to occur,” she 
says.. " ■ 

In New York and Washington 
drdes, the Susan Molinari stray is 
f ast approaching legaadL 
Both her grandfather and f after 
served zn the state legislature: Sic 
was 16 when her father was elect- 
ed to Congress. After catiegh she 
went to weak for the Repoofican 
National Committ ee in washing- . 
tan. By nge2& she had been elect- 
ed to the City CounciL At age 31, 
she won a 5perialdcctioii to Con- 
gress after her father left the seat 
to run for borough president. 

Her first marriage, to a limou- 
sine company operator, dissolved’ 
quickly. Now she is about to mar- 
ry a man wham she boldly - asked 
out a decade ago and who, earlier 
this year, proposed to her on tbe 
floor of the House c£ Representa- 
tives, where both serve. It was ml 
office romance that Washington 
coold not resist. 

Tbe couple trill set up house in 
Washington and fly to their re- 
spective districts on weekends. 
Both want children, and both in- 
sist that life will not change sub- 
stantially from its c un cu t pattern. 

If Miss Moimari runs for gover- 
nor, says her fianct, *Td be very 

careaf the lads and thediog.” " 


Q&A: U.S. Can Learn From French Concept of Health Care 


C. Arden Miller of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina was one of 
the first to sound the alarm about 
the relative decline of maternal 
and child health care in the Unit- 
ed States, based on his landmark 
comparative studies in 10 Euro- 
pean countries. Dr. Miller. ; who 
has taken part in a new study in 
France, discussed his impressions 


with Barry James of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Q. What is the main difference 
between child care in the United 
States and France? 

A. In the United Slates, we tend 
to put preventive health services in 
a medical context, linked to hospi- 
tals and to doctors. What impresses 
me so much in France is the extent 
to which routine base preventive 


services are linked to broad social 
support w hite maintaining the link- 
age to more elaborate forms of 
medical care: 

The French concept of preven- 
tion is much more global than qbb, 
and I think more valid and effec- 
tive. I'm also impressed by the very 
successful efforts that the French 
make to keep track of young chil- 
dren and to assure in so far as 



possible that they participate in 
preventive programs. This is a con- 
cept of child care we are stiD striv- 
ing for. 

Q. But you do have preventive 
care programs in the United 
States? 

A. Yes. we do. We have some 
very good p ro gram s, such as Head- 
start far preschool children. Yet 
fewer *h«m half of those entitled to 
those programs in fact participate 
in them & France, the participa- 
tion is virtually 100 percent 

Q. How do you account for this 
difference? 

A. France has impressive incen- 
tives — obligatory doctor visits and 
fmanriiil incentives —to make sure 
that childr en are involved in pro- 
tective systems. The prevailing 
view in tbe United States is that the 
health of children is tbe responsi- 
bility of their families and parents, 
rather, than of society. We are be- 
ginning to try to change that 
• 

Q. Is their anything that distin- 
guishes the system in France from 
that in other European countries 

you ha ve studied? 

A France is of particular interest 
to us because it integrates pnbhc 
and private initiatives. If we are to 
make substantial reforms in the 
United States we win obviously 
have to make extensive use of pri- 
vate health-provider systems and 
the French have striven to do just 
that Some of the other European 
countries have eminently success- 
ful programs, but they have tended 


to operate them through die public 
sector. 

Q. As you have said, same of the 
figures coming out of tbe United 
States — such as neonatal mortal- 
ity — do rat stand up well to inter- 
national co mpari son. Is this be- 
cause there are pockets of poverty 
in an otherwise rich country, or is 
the problem more general? 

A. The trend in the United Slates 
as in Europe is one of improve- 
ment. But in all truth the improve- 
ment has been less impressive m 
the United Stales. If you separate 
the data to look, for example, only 
at the white population, we stm 
don’t do as vreB as the aggregate 
results in European countries. 

• 

Q. To what extent is care for 
pregnant mothers and infants im- 
portant in a total concept of health 
prevention? 

A It is terribly important ff-I 
were to identify urn areas of great- 
est strength in health services in tbe 
United States, it would be for the 
care of sick and injured people. 
What we don’t do wel! is the as- 
sured universal participation in ba- 
ric s upportiv e and protective ser- 
vices. And I think that is critical. 

Q. What kind of problems do the 
French avoid by having this broad 
based system? What kmd of prob- 
lems exist less here than in the 
United States? 

A Fora start, they require fewer 
neonatal intensive care units be- 
cause they have fewer premature 
babies. The intensive care units are 


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Compiled by Oar Staff Fnm Dispatcka 

• HONGKONG— The Chinese 
prime minister, Li Peng, opened his 
nation’s first major nuclear power 
station on Sunday, ignoring fears in 
nearby Hong Kong of a Cbemo- 
byl-style disaster. 

Inaugurating the first of two 900- 
megawatt reactors at tbe French- 
desjgncd plant, Mr. Li said: “The 
Daya Bay nuclear power plant is 
the product of reforms and opening 
up and it has pioneered a new path 
for China to use foreign capital to 
undertake large infrastructure pro- 
jects," according to the official 
Xinhua press agency, 
i State television emphasized the 


UNIVERSITY DEGREE 

BACHELORS * MSTERS • DQCTWUrt 

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(310)471-0306 
FAX (310) 471-6456 

In *»- lirlnruMm 


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t«S*»9*5 M50W 


safety features of the Daya Bay 
plant, a pet project of Mr. Li’s. The 
plant is 30 kuoxneters (20 miles) 
from tbe British colony’s land bor- 
der. 

After the 1986 accident and fire 
at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine, 
plans to build the Daya Bay station 
provoked protests in Hoag Kong. 

More than amillkm local people 
sgned petitions against the Daya 
Bay project, a joint venture be- 
tween China and a Hong Kong 
company, China Light and r ower 
Co. 

China Light, winch will supply 
about 70 perce n t of the plant's out- 
put to the colony, has sponsored 
television documentaries and 
newspaper advertisements aimed 
at assuring Hong Kong residents 
that the 54 billion plant is safe. 

■The chmce of French design for 
the plant reflects our total commit- 
ment to safety and reliability be- 
cause the nation is one of the 
world's leaders in nuclear power 
generation for peaceful purposes,” 
the joint venture general manager. 
Zau Yunkmg, said. 

The reactor underwent trial 
start-ups last year, and cammeraa] 
production began Tuesday, state 


SbS&sS This Thne at Royal Palace 


nmdia reported. Tbe second reactor 
is scheduled to be in operation in 
mid-year. China’s only other mide- 
ar power plant, in coastal Zhgiang 
Province, has been in trial opera- 
tion for two years. 

The Daya Bay project had been 
scheduled to be opened Inst year 
but was delayed by technical prob- 
lems. 

The project manager, J-D. Hou- 
cben, said Daya Bay had & similar 
containment building as used 
at the Three Mile Island plant in 
Pennsylvania. The containment 
building prevented a major radia- 
tion leak during a 1979 acddenL 
Thai safety measure had been miss- 
ing at Chernobyl 

“Could such an accident happen 
at Daya Bay?” Mr. Hocben asked. 
“The answer is a categorical no.” 

But the publicity campaign has 
failed to ease Hong Kong jitters. 
“If there’s any accident radioactive 
dust would reach Hang Kang in- 
throe to four hours,” said Fang 
Chi-wood, a veteran anti-Daya Bay 
campaigner. “Due to Hong Kong’s 
densely populated situation it 
would be impossible to evacuate 
half a nriQian people.” 

(Reuters, AP) 


WORLD BRIEFS 

12 Blacks Shot Dead in South Africa 

JOHANNESBURG 2 83558 

shot and killed nine blade I 


pastora, are running tetw Party of pemocrahcSoaaliOTbec^wthw, 

saythey befieve it is the only party that ^jraen« tte 
downtrodden East Germans. Tm ag ainst allo wing the -Wert Gmm»; 

dm ihesoleriafet to represent us, saidMr. Hcym,S0.. 
Cnmnnmists are strong in the Eastern German states, bat- 
in Germany overall they are nnhkdyto win the 5 percent of tbe Oct- 16; 
rtwry -would need to keep a slate m p ariiam e nt . 

Suspects in Sudan Attack Are Killed : 

KHARTOUM, Sudan (AF) —Government troops shot 
mes believed to have taken part m the massacre of 13 wootapea at a; 

mosque on Friday. They wounded a third allegrf^atto^ . 

Interior Nfimster Abdd Rahman Mohammed Hnsscm sarithat two 
slain men were from West Africa and die wounded man was £om worth: 
Africa. He said documents, had been found an the men, tat aw nor 

disdose their contents. •' . . ■■ j 

Opposition figures suggested that tte government vrabetodte; 
SftfarV on the ymun mosque of the Ansar Sunna Mnsfi m sect m Q mam- 

man, across ttaNite River from 

It appeared to be unlikely that rebds in 
southern Sudan had staged tte attadc. * 

Venice and Neari>y City Vote on Split ; . 

VENICE (Renters) — Italians in Venice and tbe adjacent in dus t ri a l ; " 

... . ' - , / j 1 : tfi I Y 1 in . —nii.n nnlr»fl 


under one city counciL ' ' , „ ‘ 

The referendum is tfcthiid in 15 years on a proposed sphtbetween the, 
two eft fa i The previous two votes badrai keeping tire cities united , and. 
latest <wwmnai s urvey s showed a narrow majority — - 51 percent — ■ * 
snn p nr fr d inwmg a single counciL Results are expected tm Mon day. | 
’Venice, witfi teT canals and cultural treasures, and Mestre, an urban 
sprawl of refineries and industry, were united far economic reasons in 


terribly expensive, and it costs hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars to 
care for a single infant 
Q. So direedy or indirectly, soci- 
ety pays when things go wrong? 

A Indeed, The very high cost 
that we are paying is driving die 
reform movement in die United 
States. Certainly the cagcricace 
shows that France’s costs are less. 

Sndi iwWoth iH m tint w en t al wmrro- 

niTariftn and extensive use of fam- 
ily planning and many other pre- 
ventive measures do m foci save 


■ Q. But isn’t it true that France is 
suffering strains because of such 
factors as infants with AIDS and 
undocumented imm i g ra tion? 

A Yes, we did see problems. 
There have been some cutbacks 
and perhaps there wiB be mare: tat 
even for undocumented viators 
from other countries, there is on—, 
questioned access to basic prevent 
txve sendees at least for piregnant 
women ami through age 6. The ser- 
vices that are most essmtial to pre- 
serve health cantmne to be assured. 
• • • 

Q. What will you .do -with the 
results of your study? 

A We are drawing up ideas and 
recommendations That we hope will 
have relevance to health care re- 
form at home. In doe course, we 
win prepare a report and possibly 
some conferences and sem in a r s, 
and we will attempt to involve the 
mwtia to di w.mm ate tbe informa- 
tion in ways that may be influential 
to policymakers. 


17X0. ouppuiuasui — J 1 

Vance are given less consideratum because Mestre has more voters. . 

TRAVEL UPDATE j 

" — * l 

Safety MilestoHe on Big U.S. Airlines j 

WASHINGTON (AF) — Accidents involving major U JS. akfroes 
chained only one life in 1993, a g o v er nme nt board reported. The mrior 
airlines were involved in 23 aoodents, but the only death invoked s{ 
member of a ground crcfr who was struck by a propdkr. The National 
Transportation Safety Board said the fatal-acrideatratcamong the majos* 
anfines was tha lowest ance 4980, when no deaths were reported. : ' 

Charter aidines reported no deaths for die fourth straight year and the 
number of deaths on air taxis was 42, down from TO in 1992, preliminary 
figures showed. The only increase was on commuter airlines, where 24, 
people were killed in-1993, compared with 21 in 1992. Overall, the board' 
reported, BOO people cficdm.2,158 accidents involving nommBtaiy and; 
nongovernment planes. la 1992, 998 were ktBedJn 2^21 aocidcnti. 

• farad, seeking to increase its Bomber ^of vistara, wiB aiow foreign; 
airlines operating in the country to raise the number of their regularly, 
scheduled ffigfatt by 60 percent and charter operators to increareffights 1 


by a foreign anfmeon any stale tadd not exceed 
Al Israel Airhnes. - 

The pbw «f the artist Christo to wrap BofiaS 

saver fabric will be piri to a vote in the lower 
parliament on Fch 25- 


xcced me numbtiLCc^ cy El - 
' {Renters)' 

testa's Hridttv taadmg in! 
lower house of the German 1 
(AFPf 


Morocco has ordered aaftnrilifs in tovist reels to act against street; 
fanstteo and illegal guides. Tta Tourism Ministry said “tourist squads"! 
would be formed to conduct die crackdown and assist foreign vistora in 1 
places indnding Marrakesh, Fez, Mdmra arid Agadir. (Reuters)', 

IWsWeefc’sBWid 

Banking and government offices wffl be closed or services curtailed in! 
the foBowmg countries and their dependencies tins week because erf 1 
national and rcfigioBS bofidays: ; 

MONDAY : Grenada." ;* 

• TUESDAY: AmtnEa, toq, Slovenia. . . 

WEDNESDAY: Lebanon, Taman. Vietnam. ■ . 

THURSD AY: S ro ac. China, IkoxKang, Malaysia, Malta, M au ri t ins . Moo- 1 
goEa, SsjupcR, South Koiza, Taiwan, Vietnam. 

FRIDAY: Cameroon, Ch i n a , Hoag Kong, Iran, Japan, Liberia, Mateyrii,’ 
Monyilia , Singa pore , Somh Korea. Taiwan, Vietnam. . * 

.. SATURDAY: Burma, China, Hoag Kang, Socth Korea, Taiwan. 

SUNDAY: 

Sources.’ JJ*. Morgan, Reuters. \ 



Neither Queen Ehzabeth or any members of her family were m 
residence at the palace in central London at the time. 

UB. Embas^ offi cia ls ident ifi e d the man as James Mjfler .aXwho 
paragfided fotofhe ring at a Las Vegas hotd comriex Airing the 
bc^g_ match m November. He also caused a sto at-a Rndcs 
football game m Los Anerics wifli a snmbrr stpriT * 

. On Satorday, Mr. Mffier landed Ins para^ider — a paradmte 
powered by a fan stomped to his back — on the back roof of tta 
pajaoB. He thm took off his jumpsuit tocapore Ma iwvm body — 
pamted pT^fitan. tbe waist dosro— before running to the fremt of 
ttataadmg to grve a denefaed fist victory salute: fie^ was arrested 
withmmtrates, and the pofice said he would he ctar wa with five -* 
aviation offenses and one public order offcast, 

Bud rin g ham Falace has had security hre*3>ra m the past incfaid- 
m g i u ^ a l entnes bytoensts, pro t est a a and manaflv ifTivMnte . 




Edna and Horace, unaware of advanced 
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Imprimcpar Offprint, 73 rue fife I’Evanple. 750 IS Parti 










Page 3 





LJ-* 




N .. 

N 


international 


. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1994 



THE AMERICAS l CIVILRIGH 



30 Years Later, a Murder Conviction ^ § Backs 

th* vAAok of the vio until a decision is nade wjn appal, Wj- •- 


By Ronald Smothers 

Se» York Tunes Service 

JACKSON, Mississippi - The i wtaw iffl- 
premadst who witnesses said bragged 
killing Mcdgar Evm £ 

finally been convicted of murder. He was un- 

inediatdysenira^toUempnsoii. 

lideTw^ shot and killed outside his home 

chapter in a case that has been part of thc^ avfl- 
riSts lore of the South, emblematic of the 
SSaice and injustice that accompanied the 
drive to topple segregation. 


Outside, Myrlie Even, the widow oi me v.t- 
tim, stood before reporters and warned that she 
was about to throw off the vefl of 
that she had worn throughout the tnaL She then 
broke into a smile, loudly shouted a cheer ana 
raised a clenched fist w the sky in triumph. 

“My God. I don't have to say accused assas- 


Untii a decision is made on an appeal, Mr. 
Beckwith will he held in the Hinds County Jail. 
He will be segregated from other unnatft. 

Under Mississippi’s sentencing guidelines, 
Mr Beckwith willhave to serve a minimum of 
10 years before being eligible for parole. 


Bobby 


Mr. Beckwith, 73, found 
guilty of killing Medgar 
Evers, a black civil-rights 
leader, bad avoided 
conviction in two 
previous trials in 1964. 


Mr Evas, the Mississippi field secretary for 

ihe North for the drive to secure avil rights for 
blacks in the south- 

When word of the verdict spread, cries oijoy 
echoed in the hallways outside thecourtroomm 
the Hinds County Courthouse. But Mr. Beck- 
with showed no emotion. . 

After the verdict was announced, the judge 
called Mr. Beckwith to the bench. 

“By the mandate of the law, it is mandated 
that I se ni« > "cc you to a term of life in prison. 

Judge L. Breland Hilburn said- 
Mr Beckwith’s wife, Thelma, shrieked and 

1 u ■ , . i I i.f, fhf> mnm 


sin anymore,'’ she said. “Now 1 can say con* 
^wSber was her oldest son. Darrell. and her 


daughter, Reena. 
She' 


Iff, lUXUiL , 

She was at once happy and rueful. cfaoosmg 
one of Mr. Beckwiib’s own crude rente for 
bi kini as she discussed the significance of the 

“tE£ a message that it is no looaff 
season on jungle bunrnes she said. Med- 
gar's life was not in vam and perhaps hedid 
Sore in death than be could harem hfe. Some- 
how I think be is still among us. 

Mr. Beckwith's two court-appointed lawvers. 
Tim Kitchens and Merrida Coxwefl, could no 
be reached for comment on whether they would 
He an appeal 


that the kev to their success m 
si* witnesses who 

Mr. Beckwith brag about killmg Mr. Evers. 

Ihnst , hc raid, the most telling was 
MSkRalpT?' ’ 32 -year-old former guard in a 

powerful account of such bragging. 

Mr. Redev guarded Mr. Beckwith m M* 
when Mr. Beckwith was in prison after a pohee 
search of his car turned up weapons andamap 
narking the home of the head of New Orleans 
Ami-Defamation League. 

He said Mr. Beckwith took a liking w mm 
and bragged about “killing that upp«> “SgJ 
MedgarEvers" and about the mfluence hehad 
™ Mississippi that protected him from being 
punished for it. 


Security 
Agencies 
On Codes 


Thirty vears ago. Mr. Beckwith took the 
staSuS his defense, not only denyrng that be 
had killed Mr. Evers as he got out or the car m 
from of his home around midnight on June U 
but also to proclaim his segregationist 
opinions. This time; Mi. Beckwith, once known 
for his volubility, went through much of tne 
trial without drawing attention to himself. 


Washington Post Service 
WASHINGTON — The 
Clinton administration has re- 
jected the arguments of the 
computer industry and civil 
libertarians and sided with na- 
tional security agencies that 
seek to guarantee their ability 
to intercept and decode mes- 
sages sent over computer and 
telephone lines. 

The White House bad 
agreed to review initiatives, 
begun during the Bush admin- 
istration and pursued under 
President Bill Clinton, that fa- 
vored the FBI and the Nation- 
al Security Agency in their ef- 
forts to ensure that the 
agencies can continue to read 
aid listen despite rapidly 
evolving encryption technoi- 

°®The Commerce Department 
announced Friday that a nine- 
month review of the issue. 


on | 


_ mV n-kwith’s wife. Thelma, shrieked ana dc - — mat witnoui arawui K 

Black Muslim Leader Fails to Calm a Ra cial Stor 

M I , ukr the Democrat of Maryland and diair- • i y < 


montn roicw . — : 

which has set off impassioned 
disputes between higb-iecn- 





By Lynne Duke 

Washington Pool Service 

WASHINGTON — Many peo- 
ple concerned about race rdadons, 
particularly between. Mariks and 
Jews, had axndoudy waited to hear 
how the Nation of Islam leader. 


bow the Nation ot isiam «aoo, ynta tive and national 
Louis Farrakhan, would respond to . Muslim organizati 
lhectmuwe«ial statements of one ^ Farrakh 


r r jir. 


r* '-f 








=S&tiS= 

a w «f *SS225 SSScort. , . 

would be digiWe. 


of his aides. , 

Mr. Farrakhan has spoken, and 
now the aide is gone. But his re- 
marks failed to quell the con trover- 

hammad. Instead, they opened a 
new chapter in an already compli- 
^W and emotional saga. 

While several Jewish organiza- 
tions continued their condemna- 
tions of Mr. Farrakhan forte 
sharp-tongued remarks about Jews 
in generaland the Arm-Defama- 
fon League of B*nai B-nthmpar- 
t^niflr , ihe National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored 
People has surprised many by an- 
noSdng that it will continue to 
work with the Muslim leader. _ 
Rrarcsentatives of tte 

S^l«lc,asihey;do onh ;dafly 

h»qt- within die Leadership Gon- 1 

of words swirled, and soact a 
pressed concern about where it 

^^^r^mtative Chariff B. R Mr 

g^D^rocrat of New Y ork and 
senior member of the Congressio- 
nal Blade Caucus, said: “You never 
know where these things are gpmg 

speech, Mr. Farrakhan 

condemned Mr. Muhammad s 
coasts as /W] and “repa«- 


pressure for weeks to repudiate the 
remarks. 

The Nation of Islam leader said 
he stood bv the “truths" that Mr. 
Muhammad spoke in general, but 
announced that he had stripped the 
aide of his post as “minister, repre- 
sentative and national assistant in 
the Muslim organization. 

Hiatt. Mr. Farrakhan turned on 
the Anti-Defamation League, a 
Jewish civil rights group that gave 
Mr. Muhammad’s remark wide 
publicity. He accused the ADL of 
being “anti-black, even anti-Amer- 
icair and of tryingto break up the 

Tvlitinnchin hfftwedl Mr. 


Democrat of Maryland and chair- 
man of the Congressional Black 
Caucus, said he “wdcometT Mr. 
Fanakhan’s “discipline and re- 
buke" of Mr. Muhammad, as did 
Jesse L Jackson of the National 
Rainbow Coalition. 

The National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People 
said that it was “satisfied with 


J W UJ1U& tv * 

relationship between Mr. 
and other prominent 


Fl 

blacks. „ .. 

Of Catholics, Mr. Farrakhan 
said: “I'm not trying to be ugly, but 
the udy truth is that neither the 
Popenor the church spoke cut m 
our defense when we were bong 
todied and burned and hong! 

Several Jewish leaders portrayed 
Mr. Farxakhan’s comments as a de- 
fining moment in their quest to 
flush out his hateful beliefs. 

Hyman Bookbinder, a veteran 
Jewish activist and former Wash- 
ington irartiffltative ^GacAnOT- 
«STjewSb Cammoee, said that 
Mr. Fairakban's entire presentor 
tion Thursday confirmed that the 
Muslim leader was ann-Jew»n. 

nfla ■ ArullflPfl 



nant" In a speech at Kean College 

* ir Jersey, mNovembff,»«. 


in New Jersey, m 
Muhammad tilled Jews Mr** 1 ;, 
aSffs”Md the Pope a cn,dt< J- 
Mr. Farrakhan had been under 


days,” he said. 

As Mr. Bookbinder and other 
prominent Jews sec it, Mr. Fanak- 
Ws words were so drar^.^ 
Semitic that established bladclead 
era would have no choice i but w 
distance themselves i from .tarn By 
doing so, he added, su(J leaders 
would be show^tha^e bhde 
leadership is mdeed responsible _ 
Bat Mack civil rights leados a- 
foed no such condemnatiomk 
Rqpresentative Kwost Mfume, 


that it planned to -sponsor w* ^ 
private meeting of bladt leaden ^ 
that the Nation of Islam leader said * 
was much needed. * 

Further, the NAACP said that it 
was “prepared to believe Minister 
Farrakhan’s statement that he is 
neither anti-Semitic nor racist, and 
we look forward to concrete deeds 
in the future that would affirm his 
statements." 

Told of the NAACP statement, 

Mr. Bookbinder said he was sur- 
prised. 

“Its not my business « 
NAACP what to do. he said. But 
I would have thought they would 
wait for some actions and then take 
a look at getting together with 
them.” 

DonM^ttaNAACTdte*r 
of communications, said that the 
decision not to break tieswitii Mr. 
Farrakhan had been made by the 
group’s executive director, 

Sn F. Chavis Jr., the board chan- 
man, William Gibson, and several 
key board members. 

In bis news conference, Mr. Far- 
rakbaa singled out Jews, Catholics 
and others as the historic oppres- 
sors of African Americans. 

Mr. Rojas said that Mr. Farra- 
yhan “may have exaggerated the 
historical fact," but that it was^ a 
matter for academics to debate. 

He added, “I do not think that 
that should be a yardstick upon 
which be or anyone else should be 
condemned as anti-Semiuc. 



disputes between 
nology industries and the gov- 
ernment, bad resulted m a de- 
cision to make no major policy 

changes- . . 

That means the administra- 
tion will continue long-stand- 
ing restrictions on exports ot 
powerful encryption devices 
Sat the National Security 
Agencv cannot crack, ana 
continue to encourage use of 
agency-developed encryption 
gear." called the “Clipper 
chip," by all U.S. companies. 
The chip makes it relatively 
easy for the government to 
eavesdrop on encrypted com- 
munications. 

Taken together, the acuons 
are seen by computer and soft- 
ware companies as a govern- 

. ia Loan nntUPf- 


ment attempt 


ful encryption out of -- — 
foreign and domestic marker. 

Further, government offi- 
cials said, the administration 

is expected in a few we^ to 

endorse an FBI proposal that 
U.S. telecommunications 
companies be required to 
guarantee law enforcement 
agencies' ability to tap phone 
and computer lines regardless 
of where the technology g^- 


Addicts Use U.S. Funds 
For Drugs, Report Says 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — More than a 
billion dollars in federal disability 
payments meant to help recovering 
drug addicts and alcoholics are in- 
stead being used to help feed their 
habits, a report said Sunday. 

The report by the minority start 
of the Senate Committee on Aging 
and Congress's General Account- 

. r iMvirmAn* 


Ted jttahm/TlK Aoariiicd Pico 

Kbafid Abdul Muhammad, die 

fiimissal by Loins Farrakhan, s aluting an audience m Baltimore. 


limn > 

holies got SI .nr 

two Social Security programs; But 
only 78.000 of the beneficiaries 
were subject to any controls. 





Mr. Farrakhan naa dcuu ^ — * — 

Pentagon Chief Voices Concem on Russia 

” . . -n^Euraoangdddmcett^ 


Reuters 

'■MUNICH - The nwUmted 
Sites defense secretary, Wi^m J. 


DUBS w*™* 

Perry, pledged support on Sunday 
for Russian reforms 


lor Russia but said 

NATO would defend mem^r 
states if “a new nightmare of the 
dark” rose from the ruins of the old 
Soviet Unkm._ 

In his first policy speech as de- 
fense secretary, Mr. Perry told the 
Munich Conference on Security 
that be shared the concern of Emo- 
peau leaders over the fate of fiedg- 
Lr* mfnrtm and tbeOOSSh 


on Saturday, said NATO, under its 
post-Cold War policies, was seek- 
ing to develop cooperation with 
Russia that would lead to a new 

relationship. 

“In return, however, we expect 
Russia to continue a foreign policy 
marked by ccmstructive participa- 
tion in solving international prob- 
lems," the chanceDor said. 


“The European guidelines estab- 
lished since the conclusion or the 
Helsinki Final Act, especially un- 
1 f nr tht- wweroeD- 


bors tnrougn -r — . 

said. “Thoughts of creating spheres 
of influence or interest would not 


be compatible with this. 

Mr . Kohl said he was sure the 


nations, must uc , 

equivocally, by Russia, too, 

said. , 

“Above all Russia must rosier 

trust particularly among its nagh- 


MT. MMU saiu ut . — 

Russian leadership, and m .particu- 
lar President Boris Ydtsrn, “will 
not listen to those who rail for 
Russia to adopt a nauonalisuc or 
even imperialistic policy. 


- - ■ ^ hrtn awe problems ® 

• The space Disowo^' planned to deploy to te st 

ss— :S3 ks.sss£%SS 


Wake Shield Faqhty “Li c^ce Admimstratibu officials 

^ National Ammanwsand §»ce aop». ; .... 

.S^CapeOnavffaLFlonda. 


tmg jMissuui — — -j — ~ 

ble resurgence of an unpffiai 
Russia seeking to regain nagnbor- 
ing territories. 

“We have reason to fear a new 
nightmare of the dark in Europe rf 
reform fmls and reaction sets m, 
Mr.Peny said. 

“What must worry us most are 
the devdopmeots in the Imids or 
thcTarmer Soviet Umoo, he told 
the conference of about 200 sec™- 
ty experts, mdndmg seven NATO 
ftyfeavse mmistffs, on its seccnd 

and final day. - • ■ , 

Mr. Peny said the North Alkm- 
tic Treaty Organization, through its 

jParinosnip ^ eace P rD ? am ’ 

would continue to develop closer 
ties with- Moscow should Russia 
maintain its reform course, rrapect 
for its neighbor^ independence 
and cooperation with the West. 

“If however, reform m Russia 

falters, NATO will be there to pro- 
vide for the affies’ collective de- 
fense and wfll already have bon 
working through the Partnership 
with the active participants to pro- 
mote regiraial security,’ 1 he said. ^ 

- “In short, Russia has a choice,. 
Mr. Peny said. “And the choice 
Russia makes "will si; 
shape the future of NA’ 
Partnership for Peace." 

- Western leaders i_. 
Partncnhip concept for 


Jews Are Giving Up onBussianliie 

m« tines of the former Soviet Union 


We fly to 
the Far East 


-freest 


R^teri'AFP, NTT, AP 


. opcaRuuu . 

Russia last month. NA»w 
bad: from offering security guaran- 
tees or automatic membership to 

1 former Warsaw Pact members to 

jgasJsJSKii-o-: 

marry, addressing the conference 


By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 

Tt SSS^d by^ econonuc^ reformers m the 
R, S S 5SSd community 

era! Demooatic Party rtwaveo 
tSr of Jew, Mtt ft 

satj invitations Jtd P e ™^“ cmi „ atio n from 

Ukiamc lo “Sms who ,0I «! 

"Tm even if 

Sess and religion, if they so 

According to the 1993 annual 

Union of Jewish Communities m w mde- 
Sh of Independent States - the newty muc- 


oeodent entities of the fonner Soviet Union -- 

abouU2Q,0OT Jews left for all 

most of them from the Caucasus. Central Asia or 


Sa , JE!ffaSE‘-KB ps 

Amentum of Western-style eamonne change has 

dewed. 


more often 


, 50 uou- 

Urm to ic freedoms art D™ ^ ** 'L™ 


ic freedoms are now wumw ^ ,, 

lo^e a decern life here, and may prrfer. ^ 
aboot ann-Soninsm asde, m invest ihar 

by the Union of Jewish Connnnni- 

’^nondism in Rus- 
™ rec *? 1 cimatioa dves us reason 


than any 
other airline. 


mMnhcr of today’s opposi- 


ti< uX«i> a presidency, the repon sajre, “r* 

rioSmd orgarLticmal nelm.? 5“” hcre 

the 

sassssssss? Mr. Zhirin- 
else in the’ opposition might 

^ “We must hope for the best but prepare for the 
worst," he said- , 

Tankred Golanpdsky, editor and pdhUshcroi 
The Jewish Gazette, a Rusaan-language semi- 
toThe, too. was grown* mom 

pessimistic. 

“Tm the last person among Jews in 
to say it, but I tear in the long term there is no 
future for Jews here," he said. 



Singapore Airlines offers you 42 fi.ghrs from 14 
European cities to Singapore every week. All connect to 
over 300 flights to the Far East, Australia and New 
Zealand, and of course, til have inflight service even 
other airlines talk abour. SIHGAPORE AIRUGE^ 


— - - 7 ^- -St ’ 





i 

1 




INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune S to P Pretending the Chinese Gulag Isn’t 


PUBLISHED WITH THK NEW lORK TIMES 4ND THE WASHINGTON POST 


Lift the Bosnia Embargo 


Europe has failed miserably in its efforts to 
control the war in Bosnia. The latest proof is 
the apparent entrance of regular forces from 
both the Serbian and Croatian orznies into the 
conflict. There are credible reports of Cro- 
atian and Serbian incursion into Bosnia — 
and of Serbia's bald plans to draft its entire 
population into the war effort. And with news 
of the horrific loss of life in the latest attack on 
Sarajevo, it now makes more sense than ever 
to lift the United Nations arms embargo, 
which only hampers the Bosnian government 
in its effort to defend itself. In the past few 
weeks its army managed to win back some of 
the territory stolen over the course of the war. 
It should not be hobbled in this effort 
President Bill Clinton has responded well 
to a situation fraught with diplomatic duplici- 
ty. He has resisted both French pressure to get 
U.S. troops involved on the ground and Brit- 
ish appeals to prod the Bosnian Muslims to 
accept an unjust partition of their country just 


as they are beginning to muster some strength 
in the war. He has made it dear that U.S. 
policy on Bosnia will not be the hostage of the 
competing agendas of its European neighbors. 

It seems that Mr. Clinton’s firm stand is 
paying off. The Europeans are showing more 
flexibility. France has tried to distance itself 
from earlier requests to use UJ>. force in the 
region. Last week Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
supported the White House position on the 
partition plan, saying that no party should be 
pressured into signing on. 

Mr. Clinton has made clear his willingness 
to participate in air strikes, which presumably 
would involve American warplanes stationed 
in Italy or on aircraft carriers in the Adriatic. 
But the mam White House push should be to 
lift the senseless arms embargo- It should also 
support trade sanctions against Croatia unless 
Croatian troops are withdrawn from Bosnia 
in double-quick time. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Opening Up to Vietnam 


The trade embargo bad come to represent 
the last self-imposed restraint on renewal of 
American relations with Communist Viet- 
nam. Ostensibly, the embargo had been kept 
on strictly lo ensure Vietnamese cooperation 
in searching for Americans still regarded as 
missing in the Vietnam War, which ended for 
the United States in 1975. But unquestionably 
Americans needed time to come to terms with 
a conflict that had taken 58,000 American 
lives, convulsed American politics and society 
and ended in an unprecedented American 
defeat. The re claiming of a vestigia] honor was 
rightly seen to lie in a due respect for the 
MlAs. Vietnam played on this American pre- 
occupation in the bargaining, delaying for 
years the lifting of the embargo that President 
Bill Clinton announced the other day. 

As men of the right, Ronald Reagan or 
George Bush could easily have taken this 
major step toward normalization, had the 
MIA and Cambodia issues been ripe. But as 
one who opposed the war in his student days 
and avoided military service. Bill Clinton 
needed an even larger showing of Vietnamese 
cooperation. It took him a year, but he got h. 
last year in Cambodia, where Hanoi support- 
ed a peaceful denouement, and now with the 


MIAs, where be promises to keep looking. Mr. 
Clinton also needed, and got, a full measure of 
support across the political spectrum at home. 

A president who premises his whole foreign 
policy on adjusting to the global economy 
said he had refused trade briefings so as to 
emphasize the exclusion of trade consider- 
ations from his embargo decision. But of course 
there are trade considerations. Vietnam's ar- 
dent interest in the economic openings to which 
only Washington has the key provided crucial 
leverage. Vietnam is poor, still imrecovered 
from its war wounds and shackled by a system 
of lingering central planning. However, it has 
a large population (70 million) whose energies 
many Americans came to respect in the war. 
Expectations of quick and fancy profits court 
disappointment, but business opport uni ties 
do exist, plus opportunities for regional ac- 
commodation. On its part, Hanoi is especially 
eager to enlist the American strategic weight 
against its traditional rival, China 

As things go along, some Americans will be 
drawn to explore common human ground 
with the former foe. Many, we hope, wifi try to 
see to a widening of the tiny space now avail- 
able in Communist Vietnam for human rights. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The Stew of Hate 


Religious and racial bigotry never recede 
entirely, witness the ebb and Qow of Rian 
membership in the past century. Over a much 
shorter historical cycle, the candidly racist Na- 
tion of Islam has waxed and contracted in the 
60 years since Elijah Poole, son of a Georgia 
preacher, changed his name to Elijah Muham- 
mad and took over leadership of the sect 

Starting in the days when they were known 
in the white press as the Black Muslims, the 
group has posed problems for mainstream 
cm! rights organizations. Martin Luther King 
Jr. criticized their espousal of violence, bnt he 
couched that criticism carefully for fear of 
disrupting blade political solidarity. 

Throughout the years, whites have repeat- 
edly challenged officeholders and Christian 
ministers in the black community to repudiate 
die Nation of Islam. Black leaders have often 
responded that while they do not share the 
group's philosophy they also understand, with 
sympathy, (hat it is rooted in the rage pro- 
duced by two centuries of oppression. Why. 
they ask, should the Congressional Black 
Caucus repudiate this group when the white 
Southern Democrats in Congress never got 
around to denouncing George Wallace, Lester 
Maddox and Ross Barnett? It is also fair to 
point out that while the Senate denounced 
Louis Farrakhan, minister of the Nation of 
Islam, by a 97-to-0 vote, there was no stam- 
pede to discipline Senator Ernest Hollings for 
telling a racist joke about African diplomats. 

The one thing that America's collective ex- 
perience with racism has shown is that it 
cannot be conquered with tit-for-tat grievance 
counting. Jesse Jackson is right when he calls 
for an end to the “rhetoric war." What is 
needed is an astringently intellectual, morally 
grounded repudiation of bigotry whenever it 
occurs and from whatever source. 

The response must be all the more thor- 
ough when the racism is systematized around 
fictional ideas like Mr. Farrakhan’s pseudo 
history that casts Jews as America's main 
slaveholders. This is anti-Semitism raised to 
a psychotic level. 

Several millennia have taught Jews about 
the dangers of being scapegoated. They 
know that psychotic hatred can transmute 
into government policy with frightening 
speed. That is why blacks and non-Jewish 
whites may not fully understand Jewish con- 
cern when a handful of college students re- 
spond favorably to the obviously wacky 
hate-mongering of Mr. Farrakhan and his 
mouthpiece, Khalid Abdul Muhammad. 

Mr. Fanakhan’s phony “discipline" of Mr. 
Muhammad was a diversion, as was Repre- 
sentative Charles Rangel’s unworthy argu- 
ment that the Anti-Defamation League had 
elevated Mr. Muhammad by exposing him. 
For Mr. Farrakhan to say that Mr. Muham- 
mad is bang demoted because he used intem- 


perate language to express 'truths’’ about 
Jews is to deliver insult rather than apology. 

Representative Kweia Mfume of Maryland, 
head of the Congressional Black Caucus, prop- 
erly disowned his ill-advised “sacred covenant" 
with the Nation of Islam. He should also re- 
nounce, root and branch, Mr. Fanakhan's anti- 
white. anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic, anti-gay 
message, as should Mr. Jackson and Benjamin 
Chavis, head of the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored People. 

In return, black organizations and leaden 
have a right to ask for heightened white sensi- 
tivity to the commonplace discrimination of 
everyday life and to the increasing tolerance 
for parlor — and campus — prejudice against 
blades. The nation is far removed from the 
national teach-in on race that occurred during 
the 1950s and ’60s. To spread that experience 
to new generations, Mr. Jackson has called 
for a White House conference on racial and 
gender equality and religious tolerance. Such 
a gathering could lift Americans above the 
current fencing over whether denunciations 
have been fast and frequent enough to a new 
dialogue about bigotry. 

Thirty-five years ago, Ralph McGill 
warned against the evil stew created when 
the radal dialogue is left to “hate-filled 
minds.” He was denouncing white Klansmen 
who claimed the sanction of history to bomb 
a synagogue in Atlanta. The anti-Semitic 
ravings of the Nation of Islam leaders, under 
the sanction of distorted religion, represent 
the same kind of threat. 

Cynthia Tucker, the forceful black woman 
who now occupies Mr. McGill's chair as 
editorial page editor of The Atlanta Consti- 
tution, observed on Friday that while skilled 
hatemongers are always too smart to commit 
crimes, they indie lesser minds to act out the 
violence implicit in their words. She warned, 
"When the wolves of hate are loosed on one 
people, then no one is safe.** 

— THE NEH' YORK TIMES. 

Other Comment 

Gambling on the IRA 

The rationale for President Clinton's deci- 
sion to let IRA spokesman Gerry Adams into 
the country was that such recognition is neces- 
sary to allow Mr. Adams and the IRA to bring 
themselves to cease fire and participate in the 
reconciliation scenario to winch the Irish and 
British governments agreed. Whether Mr. Clin- 
ton was right to reverse 19 years of U.S. policy, 
infuriate .America’s most steadfast aDy and 
overrule the CIA and State Department de- 
pends entirely on whether the IRA calls a 
permanent cease-fire soon. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 



International Herald Tribune 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

C.i- Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAS. Publisher & Chief Excaime 

JOHN V1NOCUR. & Ilf ftrwfe m 

• WALTER WELLS. New SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR md 

CHARLES NU RHELMORE, Dquay Etfaon • CARL GEWtRTZ Aaraiir EStor 

* ROBERT i. DONAHUE. EJtonfthr Edavnai Pages • JONATHAN GAGE Busmen an/Finifftce fifinr 

* RENE BONDY. Derun Phbkdicr • JAMES McLEOD, Aihvmsmff Duraer 
•JUANITA L CaSPARL Intemshwal DevekrmrufJinrur* ROBERT FARRlL Cireuhatws Director. Europe 

Direneur Je la Puhiir, Vk*i : Richard £t &mtw 


fntartalioroJ HaM Tnfwic. ISl Avon*; Owricvdc-GmlJc. V252 J Ncuiilv-Mff-Scine. Rave. 
Td. : f h 46.T793.0n. Fa* : Ckubm 46J7.065 1 : Adrerfwg. 4ti.T7.5i 1 1 


S TANFORD, California — The fear, horror 
and brutality that movie audiences see de- 
picted in “Schindler's list" are daily fare in 
China's forced-labor prison camps, the world’s 


than 10 million people remain in their grip. 

While Beijing needs the hard currency that 
comes from preferred trade status, it seems 
more deeply interested in keeping the truth 
about the gulag from the world. Despite reams 
of contradictory documentation, it denies that 
it exports products made by forced labor. 

When Bui Clinton decides in June on renew- 
ing most-favored status for China, one criterion 
wul be Beijing’s compliance with a U-S.-Chi- 
oesc accord that prohibits the importation of 
products made by convicts, whether through 
forced labor or noL lacking real teeth, the 
accord is worthless. U.S. officials have request- 
ed five visits to camps, and only ooe, which took 
place last month, has been permitted. It is not yet 
dear whether tbe camp had been sanitized to 
eliminate any indications of forced labor. 

I was arbitrarily thrown into the camps in 
1960 without a trial, and spent 19 years in them. 
I was just a student, not an activist, but was 
labeled a “counterrevolutionary rightist” in 
1957 in a political campaign handled for Mao 
Zedong by Deng Xiaoping, the current supreme 


By Harry Wn 

leader of the Communist Party. 1 had antago- 
nized the authorities by condemning tbe Sonet 
invasion of Hungary in 1956. 

1 learned that the only way to survive was to 
become m ^nyum — not to Think, opt to fed. I 
was repeatedly tortured and neatly died from 
starvation and exposure to freezing tempera- 


starvation and exposure to freezing tempera- 
tures. I ate anything 1 could find, teaming to 
catch and devour frogs, snakes and rats. 

My family disowned me so that they would 
not be further persecu ted by tbe government; to 
this day. I cannot speak with family members in 
China for fear that they will be banned. 

I was released in 1979 and came to America 
in 1985. In writing my memoirs, I realized that 
I was speaking for (he imTKmw of ordinary 
people who died in the camps and remain 
nameless, faceless, unknown to the outside 
world. They are gone, but they most not be 
forgotten, and these who still labor under these 
brutal conditions mast be defended. 

These ordinary people, among them workers 
and religious believers, are still locked away as 
political prisoners, along with common crimi- 
nals; they arc forced ro vrork or starve, a practice 
that violates international law and basic decency. 


The camps and their vic tims have not been 
given adequate attention by fee American gov- 
ernment and people. Americans, remain out- 
raged over the Naas’ forced labor camps and 
Stalin’s. Why haven't the American people and. 


A few political prisoners have been freed. In 
the next tew months Beijing no doubt wffl let a 
few prominent dissidents out as a sop to Mr. . 

fTtutnn The «d minis! latino rec ently announced 
that USL officials would be allowed to' take 
guided tours erf a few camps, tret these study 
will be model camps — Potemkin villages. 

Bering and the 'international Committee of 
tbe Red Cross are discussing Red Crass visits to 
camps. But remember, in the 1930s Hitler let' 
the Red Cross into a a ct i itei jint wtwipc a n d it 

found nothing wrong in than. - 
The pofitkalhr expedkat in theadrisunstration 
and an Capitol HSU win argne that substantial 
progress has been made on human rights. 

Merchants wQl argue that the United States 
must renew China's trade status or consumers 
wm have to pay more for shoes, toys and so oti. 
Academics ana business executives wffl restate 
their inaccurate assertion that capitalism will 
lead to democracy in China. ,: : 

1 have yet to meet American businessmen in 


■ search of <Aeap labor who aremfmpaihttKto 
Emanating the camp system. TW && 

money, don't have to worry ^ labOTnmou* 

envitonErataHstSOTanyoft^ 

of representative demoCTac y. Thar only coin* 

. pfamt is with die rampant «XMrupfloc. j - 

Everyone knows that communism ls dead in . 

China. But the Communists don't want lo give 
up power. In the end, Cfcnawffi devetap real 
democracy only through domestic and mte- 

national pressures. . . ' 

TheTLS. State Departments yeany human 
rights review found that China’s record in 
1993 “fell far short of triton ationalfr accepted 
norms as it conduced to xeprcs doracstrc 
critics and failed to. control abuses by its own 
security forces.” V ■- 

Recognizing this truth about China’s failure 
to make stgmficani strides in human rights, 
America mnsthelp China’s brave and sneer- 
ing nmHinn* by cutting off most-favGred-na- 
tion treatment tbs year: Mr. Qintoa should 
.send a. dear racsgagc thai repression, in the 
gulags will not be rewarded. 

The writer, author af?&tla Winds: A Memoir 
of My Yean in GuntfsGvlag,''is resident schol- 
ar at the Hoover Institution. He contributed dm 
comment to The New Yak Times. ■ 


Yes to an American Role in Peacekeeping, but With Conditions 


W ASHINGTON — The debate 
over United Nations peace- 
keeping is healthy, for peacekeeping 
involves American resources and pres- 
tige and can involve American lives. 

The rise of regional and internal 
conflicts poses difficult issues; What 
obligations does tbe international 
community have in such conflicts? 
What U.S. role is consistent with U.S. 
interests? The administration has 
completed a policy review that will 
hrfp ensure that our peacekeeping ef- 
forts are selective and more effective. 

Peacekeeping has served U.S. inter- 
ests in Cyprus, Sinai, El Salvador. 
Cambodia and elsewhere. It can ad- 
vance our interests and foreign policy 
goals by dampening conflicts that 
threaten allies, giving breathing room 
to fledgling democracies and provid- 
ing equitable sharing of burdens. 

More than 90 percent of United 
Nations peacekeeping troops cook 
from other countries; almost 70 per- 
cent of the cost is borne by others. 
Unfortunately, there have boat many 
problems with UN peacekeeping. 

Let us be dear. Peacekeeping is 


By Anthony Lake 

The writer is President Bill Oman's national security adriser. 


not at the center of our foreign or 
defense policy. Our armed forces’ pri- 
mary mission is not to conduct peace 
operations but to win wars. The bot- 
tom-up review of our post-Cold War 
defense requirements ensures that we 
remain prepared to do that 

We will never compromise military 
readiness to support peacekeeping. 
Nor would we oesuale to end our 
engagement in a peace operation if 
that woe necessary to concentrate 
our forces against an adversary in a 
major conflict. 

Tins administration has no inten- 
tion of transferring troops into a 
standing world army. There may be 
occasions when the president deter- 
mines it is in our interest to place 
U.S. personnel under temporary for- 
eign operational control, as in NATO 
and Desert Storm. But tbe president 
will never relinquish las c o nsti tutional 
command authority over U.S. troops. 

The fear that the administration 


would subcontract its foreign policy 
to any power or person is nnrea&tic. 
So is the notion that we should aban- 
don peacekeeping altogether. 

Toe administration will continue 
and expand regular consultations 
with Congress on all aspects of our 

peacekeeping policy and will discuss 

with the Congress ways of working 
together when there are posable de- 
ployments of U.S. military units in 
UN peace operations. 

There are four m| " n dements to 
our policy. First, we are asking tough 
questions before voting for a peace 
operation at the United Nations and 
wul ask even tougher ones before we 
involve U.S. farces. What is the 
threat to oar interests? Is there a 
clearly defined mission? A distinct 
end point? How much will it cost? 
Are me resources available? What is 
the likelihood of success? As the pres- 
ident said at the United Nations, we 
have began wEng such questions be- 


fore voting in the Security ConnaL 

Second, we w3Lwotk with the o&- 
er UN members to establish a mare , 
equitable sharing of peace opera- 
tions’ costs. Our current share, more 
than 30 percent, results from a for- 
mula set in 1973. The world has 
change and we want to redoce.our 
share to 25 percem. 

Third, we and other UN m embers 

am wmirinp to uring mmfen manage -. 
rnwit and financial a cco u nt a bility to 
UN peace operations. There is no 
douto that the United Nations is over- 
extended. We have proposed extensive 
re fra i ns, inducing the creation Of~a 

modem cranmantrations center and 
toasties support system, that win en- 
able the United Nations to pim and 


ensure, that out farces receive appro- 


Fourth, we wifl outline a new divi- 
sion of respousibfify for peare oper- 
ations between tbe Jnate and Defense 
departments. (The Pentagon would 
have primary and fi- 

nancial responsibility for UN opera- 
tions that are likely to involve com- 
bat.) And while we wiQ not designate 
separate peacekeeping troops, we will 


We are realistic about the limits of 
peacekeeping: As we see in Somalia, 
peacdoeepeQ can oeate an oroorto- 
mty for peace, but the responsibility 
far the future of a society most al- 
ways rest with its own people. 

Can the United Nation build na- 
tions far others? No. 

. . Can we let the United Nations be- 
come a dumping grcnmd for conflicts 
that the waiting parties themselves 
lack the will to resolvti? No. 

Do UN peace operations always 

benefit the American peopkff Na 

Should we then throw away an 
often useftrf foreign poEcy tool in a fit 
of frustration? Of comae not. 

This year, as we have advanced our 
major foreign policy goals — promot- 
ing open nmrkets, renewing our secu- 
rity, supporting democracy — we 
have acted rione when necessary: But 
at times, wooing with /UN peace- 
keepers is what works best when 
that u tbe case; we win be committed 
to getting the job done right ' 

The New York Times. 


Read AU About It 


Good Old Brits vs. the Wicked Continent 


B RUSSELS — Everyone in Brussels 
knows that Britain is in the European 
doghouse. Margaret Thatcher used to spit 
ana snarl. John Major likens the European 
aim of monetary union to a rain dance, 
presumably of an African tribe. And this has 
consequences. 

Although London is without question the 
biggest financial market in Europe, tbe Eu- 
ropean central bank is to be in Frankfurt 
When Jacques Delors goes at the end of this 
year, the commissioner best qualified to suc- 
ceed him as president is without doubt Leon 
Brittan. Few in Brussels believe that be will 
get the job. When Brits come up for promo- 
tion in the Commission, the}' are looked at 
askance. “Are they one of us?" the Conti- 
nentals, not unreasonably, ask. 

An industrialist who runs tbe Belgian 
subsidiary of a major multinational told me 
not long* ago that his people went along 
regularly to ask tbe Commission about its 
future plans. Anytime someone asked hew 
the British would react the answer would be, 
“Why bother about them — they’re halfway 
out of Europe already." 

A major reason for this state of affairs is 
never mentioned in tbe British press. This is 


By Roy Denman 


because the British press is a major reason. 

More than 80 pe rce n t of the daily newspa- 
per rircidalion m Britain consists of tab- 
loids. Since the national educational system 
was restructured to satisfy the ceahtarian 
desires of the Labor Party of the 1960s, the 
market is semi- literate- words of more than 
two syllables axe shunned. The themes are 
sports, sex, the royal family and an almost 
unbelievably crass xenophobia. 

The headline “Up Yours Delors” is well 
known. Less well known is another, from the 
day when a statue of Air Marshal Sr Arthur 
“Bomber” Harris was unvefled by the Queen 
Mother. Not surprisingly, some German tour- 
ists mildly booed. “Hun Scum Boo Queen 
Mom,” thundered The Sun. Britain is not the 
only European country to have tabloids, bnt 
it has more of them and they are more viru- 
lently anti-European. 

Of the daily broadsheets, two foreign ab- 
sentee landlords control more than half the 
circulation. They both detest the European 
Union, and their editorial staffs have pan- 
dered slavishly to this whim. Facts are never 


allowed to get in the way of a good story 
ridiculing anything which goes on among the 
Wogs south of the CbanneL 

Daring the Danish debate oh the Maas- 
tricht referendum, modi was made of a 
Commission regulation setting out the 
curves required in cucumbers for packaging. 
No one mentioned that this regulation had 
been drafted by the Commission and then 
approved by the 12 member states at .the* 
request of the Danish government, respond- 
ing in turn to a request from Danish encum- 
ber growers. One of the British correspon- 
dents in Brussels says openly that the 
standing instruction from his editor is “Send 
knocking copy” 

Things are not modi better in the other 
broadsheets. Firmly fixed in the minds of 
most of their editorial writers is the doctrine 
of PEWFAA — Protectionist Europe, Wick- 
ed French and Angelic Americans. Why — 
(me can hear the constant question over the 
scratching of their pens —have decent jfd- 
lows like the Brits got entangled with this. 
Continental lot, with their crazy Common ' 
Agricultural Policy, and the wicked French 
always dreaming up more knavish protec- 
tionist tricks? If only we could have allied 


ourselves with the Americans, to wham snb- 
ridies any t rad e-distortin g j™*- 

tice areas foreign assmto a newborn child. 

No one dates to mention that on agricul- 
ture any French government. faces .& milKrai 
farmers. In Britain, 50,000 coal nrinera bo- 
mtEatingly propelled a British government . 
mtoecoaoodc loonjitauL 

No one chooses to mention that the United 
States gives subsidies on a major scale to its 
dairy famavthat to restrictions on sugar 
imparts damagepoar countries in the Carib- 
bean to the profit of rich-sugar producers in 
- the United states, and that agricnltimtl pro- 
duction in .the western fluid of the United 
States would hardly be possible without a 
masave federal irrigation subsidy. 

This daily portrayal of fantasyknd has its 
effect It ifivides Britain from the Continent 
It damages British interests there- And it 
mevitahly distorts the view winch the wadd 
superpower has of Ena* Americans need to 
realize that most of the British press, for 
diverse and not very rcspectable reasons, 
chooses to depict Europe as tbe land of the 
Wizard of Gz, with John Mm or as' Dorothy 
and Jacques Ddors as the Wu±ed Witch. 

- International Henld Tribune. 


In This Caricature of America, Everybody Skates Away Scot-Free 

T OKYO — All over Asia, people By T. R. Reid unfair advantage becanae of steroids, gM from a broken borne, thedatist 

are completely fascinated with you’re out — even if yon insist that sty, so yon shouldn't expect her ti 

he UB. Olympic figure skating scan- athletic difficulties. She developed a Compare that with Tonya Har- you didn’t know what your coach was play fair, to tdl the troth to the FBI 


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V /Wjt. hemaaiad Her,U Tnhrr. .Ml mefitd ISSN: WflSL asSMI 


T OKYO — All over Asia, people 
are completely fascinated with 
tbe UJ3. Olympic figure skating scan- 
daL This is partly due to the powerful 
melodramatic pull of a real-life mys- 
tery story amid the glamour of world- 
class sport Beyond that though, the 
Tonya Harding case has proved irre- 
sistible because it seems' to confirm 
all tbe worst stereotypes that people 
overseas love Jo bold about America. 

Viewed through the prism of tbe 
feisty Asian sports newspapers — 
never reticent about reporting on the 
darker side of U.S. society — the 
assault-on-ice isjust another example 
of modern-day .America at work: a 
country where the concept of fair 
play lost out long ago to sheer greed: 
a country where violence eme rges os 
the solution to every problem; a 
country where even an ice skater 
nowadays dare not go anywhere 
without a pair of buriy bodyguards 
and a battalion of lawyers. 

Lately, the overseas image of .Amer- 
ica. drawn from a number of recent 
trials, has focused on the idea thin it is 
a place where you can do whatever 
you want — and get away with h. 

You can IriH your parents while 
they are eating ice cream in front of 
the television sec You can ravage 
your wife. You can maim your hus- 
band. You can pull cut a gun big 
enough to kill a grizzly bear and blow 
the life out of an innocent 16-ysar- 
old foreign exchange student 'who 
rings your doorbell on Halloween. 
You can do any of those things and 
then find an American jury tha: will 
let you get away with iL 
For the most part this is a grotssoue 
parody of the United States, probably 
inspired in large part by resenurcnt 
and jealousy of a country that now 
stands as the militarv, economic and 
cultural colossus of the world. 

But that dangerous, decadent 
America — a country where ao red 
deed ajes punished — is tire America 
that the foreign media love to por- 
tray. And if Tonya Hardrng geis to 
represent America on the US. Olym- 
pic team, she will go to Norwav as’ the 
personification of that .America. 

Like other world-class skaters, 
Tonya Harding devoted huge chunks 
of her life to the hard wwk of perfect- 
ing her skills. With dedication and 
diligence, she overcame peraonal and 


athletic difficulties. She developed a 
style that combines agility and power 
to a degree that few skaters anywhere 
can match. If it stopped there, Ameri- 
cans could be proud to have her rep- 
resent them in Norway. 

But Miss Harding also developed 
an acute sense of victimhood- If any- 
thing went wrong, it was somebody 
rise's fault. She was always being 
cheated. She made that point over 
and over in interviews, and it came 
through loud and dear to the mugs 
and ex-cons she surrounded herself 
with. Much like Henry n (“Who will 
free me from this turbulent priest?"), 
she set tbe train of violence in mo- 
dem. then denied responsibility when 
those around her took tbe hint 
To some foreign media, that flight 
from responsibility is the most Amer- 
ican thing about the whole sordid 
business. “Tbe Tonya Harding case 
helps us to understand," a reporter on 
Japan's TBS-TV network declared 
breathlessly one night last week, “what 
a big difference there is between the 
United States and Japan in the con- 
cept of personal responsibility.’* 

The Japanese cannot resist com- 
paring Miss Harding to their own 
favorite skater, Midori Ito, who was 
Asia's greatest hope at the 1992 Win- 
ter Olympics. Like Miss Harding, 
Miss Ito is a muscular, dynamic skat- 
er belter known for athletic prowess 
than lithesome grace. Like Miss Har- 
ding, she mastered the triple axd, hop- 
ing that it would be her ace against 
taller, more elegant competitors. 

While her whole nation watched 
with bated breath. Miss Ito launched 
an all-out drive at Albertville for tbe 
gold medal. In her final program she 
tried not just one but two triple axels; 
she hit one perfectly and missed the 
other. Tbe effort proved good enough 
to edge post one American competi- 
tor — a graceful brunette named 
Nancy Kmigan — but she still ended 
up m second place, behind America's 
Kristi Yamagochi- 
When tbe medals were awarded, 
Mbs Ito stepped before tbe cameras 
to speak to tbe television audience 
back home. She gpe her countrymen 
a deep, apologetic bow. “I hu mbly 
apologize," she said. “It was my fault. 
I just messed up." 


Compare that with Tonya Har- 
ding’s regular chorus of “I wnz 
robbed!" when things don't go her 
way, and you can see why Japan be- 
lieves there a a "big dffl enmee" when 
it cranes to personal responsibility. 

In fact, one of the big differences at 
work is determining the level of re- 
sponsibility that Miss Harding 
should be held to..Many Americans, 
judging from opinion polls, hare de- 
cided that she should oe entitled to a 
spot on tbe U.S. team unless she 
meets the criminal definition of re- 
sponsibility. That is, unless she is 
proved guilty of something covered 
by the criminal law, she is innocent 
enough to represent the United 
States in the Olympics. 

“Innocent until proven goflty" is 
one of the majestic glories of Ameri- 
can jurisprudence. Enshrined in law 
by men who knew the terrors of tbe 
Star Chamber and tbe royal bill erf 
attainder, it was designed to protect 
an individual’s liberty and property 
against the unjust whims of govern- 
mental power. But this minim al stan- 
dard was not designed to confer hon- 
or, privilege or the right to represent 
the United States on tbe world stage. 
“Not yet indicted" may be the appro- 
priate criterion fra deciding whether 
somebody ought to be in jail, but the 
picking of America’s Olympians has 
traditionally involved something more 
than this bottran-of-the-barrd test. 
The Olympics involves concepts Eke 
teamwork, fairness and responsibility. 

Figure skating is called an “individ- 
ual" sport, hut at the Olympic level it 
is anything but Any warid-dass skat- 
er has a team of coaches, assistant 
conc h es, choreographers, «whimw de- 
agneis. media advwo, managers and 
even, God forbid, bodyguards. The 
skater is tbe head of the team, and if 
the team wins, tbe skater quite fairiy 
gets the credit By the same trim, if 
use team cheats, as Miss Haxtimfifs 
team did, it seems onfy fair ihatne 
skater should bear (he respo na lulity. 

If an athlete is given an unfair 
advantage over her competitors, that 
is nonnally enough to krcp her out of 
tbe game When they give those ran- 
dom drug tests at the Olympics, no- 
body asks whether the athlete know- 
ingjy took tbe drags. If you have an 


unfair advantage becanse of steroids, 
you’re out — even if yon insist that 
yon didn’t know what your coach was 
stirring into the oatmeaL ' *••• 

Tonya Harding's tram got an un- 
fair advantage in a reprehensible 
way — through deliberate violence 
against a competitor. She knew 
about it — at least after tbe fact — 
and lied to cover it up. 

Now some people argue that. this is 
irrelevant unless it can be proved 
beyond a shadow of doubt that Miss 
Harding knew beforehand the dirty 
tricks her team employed to help har 
win. Whether or not sbe bad^xior 
knowledge" may make adifferenceto 
a grand jnry. fit Olympic terms 
that is, in terms of sportsmanship — 
ihepomt is irrelevant. 

Tne sophisticated New York liber- 
als who sat around the bar at Etaine’s 
and decided that Tonya Harding 
should be the object of their sympa- 
thy are really saying that folks who 
Bre in trailer camps in Orq$osi don’t 
understand concepts tike honesty 
and sportsmanship. She's only a poor 


grd from a broken homo, the elitists 
say, so you shouldn't expect her to 
play fair, to tefl the truth to the FBI, 
or to express regret about ' a fesQow 
dealer’s misfortune. 

In fact, mostpeqplein Oregon, like 
most other Americans, understand 
perfectly wdl what fan: play is afl 
about The scores of ordinary work- 
ing-class Americans who wifi repre- 
sent their country at The Olympics 
this month arc people who have lived 
all their tires f pflo wmg the rules, tdl- 

SHly far their 

But if Tanya Harding is p ermit ted 
to wear the mrifarm with the Ameri- 
can fl a^ai LtDchammer, the foreign 

press ww pay jk> attention to all those 


the woricTs medra/tbe only American 

at the Otympk* win te tfcone who 
seems to stand for tbe notion that in 
'modern-day America yon can do any- 
thing -r- and skate away abot-ftee. 

The writer is Tokyo bureau chief of 
The Washington Post 


ica to confer non- . 

n^torejresent IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AM) 50 TEARS AGO 


1894: Mardi Gras Feted 

PARIS — The man who got a hand- 
ful of confetti in his month last eve- 
ning had so occasion to go hunting 
up an almanac to find out what it was 
au about. The words ManE Gras, 
were written all over the boulevards. 
It poured March Gras all day. The' 
street-sweepers who go to work tins 
momma [Feb. 7] removing a fall of 
two inches of Hole paper wafers will 
know better than anyone what 
Strove Tuesday was in Pans. Not 
long after tbe Sun was up the grand 
boulevards were invaded by a aowd j 
of those who frequent then tittle On 
ordinary days. The pavements and 
the thoroughfares .were given over to 
the merry battle of catfeta. 

1919: A German Cjisis 

LONDON — Latest dispatches from 
Germany iiwTirate that the labor cri-. 
sis in Berfin is beaaniM more acute 
The “Frankfurter Zooms" states 
that there ^are dreadyZWXwO unem- 


pkwed in Greater Becfin and. as the 
lack of coal will compd the 
down of many more eKtaMif h mf nra i 
tins total will be swelled to 300,000 
within the next few days. Many 
more disorders are omected in tire 
capital and it is predicted Out the 
““^5 oftlK new Constituent As- 
sembly will grve rise to further con- 
flicts with the extremists. 

1944: Raid Over France 

AMERICAN FORTRESS -BASE, 
&gand -- ffrom onr New York 
edition:] Malang the best of breaks in 
the overcast dey, a moderate force of 
heavy American bomber's returned to 
France and 


rad memories rat objectives in the 

Fas-deCalns area indiodmgEre mr- 

fejfe. whfle medium bombds at- 
tacked two Other airports and rrnli- 
tary taraets m northern France: 
Mray ofthehcayy bombas tinned 
backirom their attack wharrhe tar- 
gete were found obscured by clouds 
and brought their tiotob loads home. 




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*4: 



Paris Seeks NATO Ultimate: 
Lift Siege or Face Air Strikes 


By Roger Cohen 


New York Times Serr.ce 

PARIS — France said Sunday 
that an emergency NATO meeting 
on Bosnia wouid be held within the 
next 48 hours and that it should set 
an ultimatum; Lift the siege of Sa- 
rajevo or face the military power of 
the Western alliance. 

Amid a chorus of horror and 
indignation from European leaders 
over the mortar-shell attack on Sat- 
urday on the main Sarajevo mar- 
ket, which killed at least 68 people. 
Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said 
Serbian forces ringing the Bosnian 
capital must be withdrawn to at 
least 30 kilometers (18 miles) and 
all heavy arms of the belligerents 
handed ovct to UN troops. 

“1/ these two demands are not 
met,” said Mr. Juppe, who was 
flanked by Defense Minister Fran- 
901& Ltotard. “then all means, in- 
cluding air power, must be de- 
ployed to ensure they are." He 
declined to say how much time the 
ultimatum should allow. 

Foreign Ministry officials said 
Mr. Juppe had spoken three times 
to the U.S. secretary of state, War- 
ren M. Christopher, over the week- 
end, and the Western response to 
the mortar attack, the worst single 
attack of the 22- month Bosnian 
civil war. was being closely coordi- 
nated between European govern- 
ments and Washington. 


In the past year, amid repeated 
disagreements and misunderstand- 
ings, such cooperation has been 
singularly absent 

But the French officials also said 
that while the United Stales had 
agreed to the NATO meeting, like- 
ly to be held in Brussels shortly 
after a meeting of European Union 
foreign ministers on Monday, the 
idea of an ultimatum was a French 
proposal to which the country’s 
NATO allies had not yet given a 
final response. 

“Ultimatum is a very strong 
word, but it is appropriate to use it 
at this stage," said an adviser to 
Mr. Juppt “What patience re- 
mained in Western capitals has dis- 
appeared as a result of this attack." 

Nonetheless, several problems 
appeared to remain with the 
French proposal. 

While the ultimatum to the Serbs 
to withdraw to at least 30 kilome- 
ters appeared likely to win quick 
consensus from NATO allies, 
France wants the ultimatum for 


turn instructing them to hand over 
their heavy weapons appeared cer- 
tain to provoke an angry response 
from the Bosnian government and 
some skepticism room the United 
States. 

Another problem, as French De- 
fense Ministry officials conceded, 
is that any NATO air strikes in 
Bosnia seem likely to provoke Rus- 
sian anger. Serbs are traditional al- 
lies of the Russians. 

Moreover, there are 3,000 UN 

peacekeeping troops in Sarajevo, 
more than 2,000 of them French, 


and they would dearly be exposed 
• -aNATO 


handing over heavy weapons to 


UN forces addressed to both the 
Serbs and the Muslim-led Bosnian 
forces. _ 

With the Bosnians already indig- 
nant over ihe international arms 
embargo that has been imposed on 
them, which they say amounts to 
condoning their slaughter by the 
encircling Serbs, a NATO ultima- 


10 reprisals in the event of a ! 
air strike against Serbian artillery. 

Still, it seemed clear that the 
mortar attack bad jolted European 
leaders 10 a new level of outrage. 

The German government issued 
its strongest call yet for air strikes 
in Bosnia. Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl's spokesman. Dieter Vogel 
said, “The use of selective militaiy 
measures like the ones NATO of- 
fered to the United Nations on 
Aug. 9, 1993. must no longer be 
ruled oul" 

The Belgian foreign minister, 
Willy Gaes. also called for rapid 
air strikes by NATO in Bosnia, and 
the I talian defense minister. Fab- 
bio Fabbri, said Italy's air bases 
would provide support “if and 
when NATO decides to intervene 
in Bosnia." 


Will Renew 
Serbia Ties, 


4. 

f. \i(l«* 

Jfy’rr^ 





j By David B. Ottaway 
' '. 'VIENNA— Hungary has decid- 

ed fo nonnalize its r efla t ions .with 
5ob£em-3bd^ Yugoslavia, according 
to diplomatic sources mVkana. 
They said the moveiconld. deal a 
dcvastating Wow to UN economic 
sanctions ‘ 


son is very Bkeiy to; 

Ida’s other major tra 
V such: as Rjwnarai, 

Greece — to adopt ft: 
rtikt wpnld probably lead to their 
taring up on ; enforcement of- the 
sanctions.- ! . 

TheUJi strategy of lreejti^Yu- 


BOSNIA: Clinton Urges Push for Peace After 68 Die inSarajevo Attach 


— at . 

to the- Bosnian conflict is readied 
would then bein serious trouble. 


* •f-y ■ 


Continued from Page 1 
negotiated settlement, Reuters re- 
ported. 

A White House official said Mr. 
Clinton was told by Mr. Christo- 
pher on Sunday that most Europe- 
an leaders were "still in the process 
of working out their own views" on 


how to read, to the modem. 

The official added that Mr. Clin- 
ton wanted to see official UN con- 
firmation on tbs origin of the mor- 
tar shell, not merely a prefimmary 
conclusion based on the impact 
crater. 


Army medical , team and three 
transport planes to fly from Ger- 
many to Sarajevo, to assist : and 
evacuate, some -of the people 
wounded in the attack. 


The president bad ordered a UJS. 


Before flying bade to .Wasbing- 
ton from Munich, Mr. Perry called 
the shelling “cmforgiyable.". ‘ 



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□ Mr □ Mrs DMiss □ Other Title 



Name 


mULr NAME 


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Magna Hastens & CbVTHA 3]38HT j 



, But he cautioned about the pros- 
pect forair strikes. ... . '• 

- “Tito question is not what werre 
capable of dc«bg bat what the re- 
al£lhe politicalrcsalt. would be," 

. herald “If air strikes are Act One 
- of a new melodrama, wbat is Act 
. Two, Art' Three, and. wfad as the 
condusiort of the melodrama?”' '■ 
He added; If islime iqrnspoa- 
sible leaders among the Waning 
factions to sta} -forward and be. 
counted. It is mats fortfae iman&r 

t ying t R rimmmri tytoStiUld tOffitBer 
and hTm g iH^mq-ph'iirTTipressiire to 

bear " ' . --v 

' Senator Bob Dote of &h«s,the 
Senate Republican leader, renewed 
his call for the Unded States to 
scad arms to BosmanMusHnfc by 
‘ Sntitafer aty Effing the UN em- 
bargo on arms' shipments J to- fl»e 
warring parties is thefoocaw'Yugo-. 
slavra. . . .. - .. .... 

' Action by Washn^ton to"- cast 
aside the embargo vroiM-.be fol- 
lowed by rinular.Freodi'and Brit- 
ish action, be predicted." ' .- 

"jj’j time for the g j j t (iep i ttmi- 


_ Dr _- -1 its intention to 

relations in Geneva last 

week at, A dosed meeting of the 
cti-^ring committee of the Intema- 
Conference on the former 
Yr^odavia, accordingto a dipto- 
matwbo Was present-The coamtit- 
teeyfas reviewing the efforts of the 
conference's co-chairmen, David 
Owen c£ Britamand ThorvaldStd- 
tiaibogrif Norway to find a setde- 
ment to the Bosnian war. 


... 


. . *- . 

W-'.TCJ 

Jit. 


r-.IbeHim garijni representative at 
the Genevameeting did riot sperifi- ' 
caBy say Budapest plans to. resume 
trading wife Yugoslavia, according 
tptbe.soarce&^beappearedto 
signal bis govennnemfs ujicotini 
to do ibis by ecanfdaming bitterly 
alxmt though cost tf 
— said io be $13 teffion — to 
Hungary's economy, they said 
Nuroaous UN econonticand fi- 


... . 

• ... ■ v 


. .... 




OKI 


to step up. to the pkiu^! he added 
A panel of fading U.iC foreign 


es of State -Geotge'-P. 
' .Shnlft! and Edmund S. -Mtedde 
raged the White Honse io 
air power in Bosma,vcaIfing 
Lpo^futtofybanlti^" ;r ' -v 


Ybgariavia pn ^rasnefy m 1992- 
93 to piess ure it mto withdrawing 
its forces from Bosnia and forcing 
its Bosnian Serb allies to agree to a 
settlement. With' much U5. prod- 
dmgi thtr have been steadily tight- 
ened and have bad a crippling ef- 
fect on Serbia's economy. 

But, the UN sanctions have also 
badly hurt Serbia’s nrighbors, cut- 
ring off trade, arid investment and 
creating endless botdcnecks fur 
road tianspoitaticia throughout the 
repdri. 


% :* 


10 : h's « 


CUBAt ;^ Budding of a New System, 


CoatHmedframF^eL 


available, the gawqmfathasmarir 
aged to distribute the- month^rTa- 
tion offivc'gafldns of pBaJrnte- 
de, vdndl hhad1>^^iahle'to do 
forniostof Jastyeiri: 1 \'--i .: 

' *T^ ^'Tri : a pr^^ 
dcrwayLytijere we aresrekmgto 
increase oar eamonne oulprit wife- 
OTtamverting sodrty into adendf 
woflres.” saM^ ^J 

Ecanomic Coopeiritk^ “Wri are 
trying topreservp thebaac achieve- 
mentsof the revolution, because if 
we lose that, we lose sodal stalnl- 

i*y” ' - 

He added:.- w \Wth ifl^al -actra- 
ties, it is a question df^^ying the 
law. It -is riot tofleranc^ bm we 
cannot focus on the problem pnrefy 


far 30 ^ars until 

July, circulate freely. A chain of 
state^owned haidetmeray stores is 

flonrishing. . 

“We live in a world fuB of new 
and unjwedktabte proWans,^ said 
Ricardo Alarofin, president of the 
national k®riatnre, m anJtatraview 
last month with state-rim Radio 
Rebdde. “Bat assnnring no ex- 
traordinaiy disaster occurs, we are 
able to a f firm that he ghmipg in 
1994, modestly, we will beribk to 
reveise the stuatkm Cubahas been 


gtowtiiifihpcaninginafreemariiet 
eaajcany v Altho^i tome tilings 
. are marginally more available, the 
jtffipiat ration book, vrfrich sets the 
qdotaspf;basm goods. Gibansre- 
ce^ frojn the state CTCry iri6flth;TS. 
bardy enoOgbtolast most peopfc 
two weeks. Baser products fike 
shampoo mid soap are still almost 
anavaflable outside the' dollar 
econrxuy. 

Still, there i$ a growing feding 
that & new systena is ane^ing. 

A .fareiga b usine s sm an ~woririiig 
in one of the 120 jerat ventures 
imder way here smd Oat “slowly, a 
system is cmergmg.'’ . 

. “Finally;" ^ ^hc s»wJ, “we 'know 
who to dal .with. Attitudes are 
changfog, but it win take years to 
ga tfings really naming.” 

■ In addition to, authorizing the 
use of dollars, tire govranment has 
legalized about 140 cathodes of 


No one is talking about a ieooy- 
cay to the pie- 1989 days when the 
Soviet Union supported Cuba as its 
drier ally in Latin America, and the 
country still lodes raid feds strick- 
en compared with Latin American 
neighbors like Mexico, • where 


setf-employment for certain sectors 
of the population. And, in what 
Cuban officials described as the 
most radical step taken, most of the 
nation’s state-owned farms have 
been turned into sehriantouemoas 
cooperative* - 

These cooperatives wfll.be sdf- 
finanoed, the officials said, and, , in 
an effort to qpur badly seeded food 
production, workers will- be given 
financial rewards, for , exceeding 
their weak quotas, Ihe 
fives can also dismiss ' 



: ’IWvinaMp 


workers and lay off surpfa labor, 
samethmgnjriv m this txaditibnafiy 
stato-nm ecooraay, ahhoq^i gov- 
emmcDtofficials now admowlMge 
proditttion has been extremely in- 
cffitaenL . 


KOREA: Pentagon ’& Revised Plan, 


Ca nti aaed froa Page i~ 

commandos bdund UJS. and Sopth 
Korean fines, and has increased, to. 
47, from 5, the number of anti? 
aheraft guns, around its Yorig- 
byong midear installation. It as 
also trying to expand 'its mfatfoT 
power.. 

According to inidligence -offi- 
cials, tbc North has stationed more 
than -8,400 . artfllefy pieces- arid 
2,400 - multiple rocket launchers 
within- 100 kzkrawtas (60 utiles} 
die border. Much of the artiUny is 
so dose to the demilitarized zone 
that Seoul, about SO kilometers 
from the border, is within firing 


North Korean Army would be 
routed. ..But. it . would be virttutlly 
imp assi b fe to prevent the devasta- 
tion of modi of the beavfly poptr- 
lated and economically vital South 
Korean territory near the border. 


_ United States h» Stationed 
five advanced tadar^ tracking sys- 
tems in Sdath Korea to piiqwint; 
North.. Korean artillery , fire ynd- 
would' alto use spotter planes to 
djreeratr stakes. 1 - 
The North Korean military has 
its weaknesses. Seme Pentagon. of- 
ficials say that fad shortages have 
Smiled large-scale draining, They 
also question whether North Kore- 
ancommanders ^onld effcctirdy 
coordmaie sich on attack in the 
fare of ^tied ah ^erkxiiy. 

StiB, because to mudi . of the 
North’s artiDay and other forces 
are doseto the bordar, the allies 
might .have as. Hole as 24 to -76 
hours' wanting Of ah attack, an 
American, military official said. ' 
The dominant view within die 
Pentagon is that it would only be a 
matter of time before an invading 


Drawing onthe experienceof the 
Gulf War, , in which -the.. United 
States sent in its best armored arid 
air units. instead of . husbanding 

than in case trouble broke oat else- 
where, the Pen tagon has revised the 
list Of reinforcements. Thar timely 
dispatch would be critical since the 
United States " has only about 
35,000 troopsm South Korea. 

Th e j>lan alto embodies new 
army doctrine, winch « np hasro*< 
aggressive .counteroffensives - in- 
stead of rstfttic defenses. UJ5. and 
Sooth. Korean' forces would try to 
slow the North Kmean groundas- 
saadt northof SeouL buy ti me while 
ranforcements ’pour in' and theft 
repulse the mvaders. 











V. 
















V: — £ '--’ft 




it? £ 

■■■ 




jor change is in the 


But the 

next step<i ^ d 

U-S. and South.. Korean - forces 
would ores into Nrath Korea after 
heating back the North’s forces and 
occupy Pyongyang,. • ; 


With an eyer to Chinese sensiiiv- 
ities,hhasnotbe«deadaiwhctii- 


»-.>x r\.« 


farfimr north than Pyongyang; or 
whether the allies would pursue if 
fa^gowrameht fled towrad r L - 
Yaha,.a senior administration ~ 
rial said. • 




iL 





- j- iy.^ r mr iT -" ■■ — ;— - ... -,- 


x t ri5ar :-:: ^^~iC*&'.\ : -’;?f~.V: 


^PJf l tl>* 14S£> 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 7. 1994 


Page 7 



By Lee Hockstader « 

Washing ton Pan Service ®f 

HELSINKI — A diplomat with -® 
no experience in domestic pohtics tc 
won the Finnis h presidency. Sun* ” 
’day, capitalizing on voter disco- 
•chantment wjih traditional. polio- i] 

■ dans and a straggling economy. t 
* With 99 percent of thcballois -r 

counted, Martti Ahtisaan, a 56- i 
year-old Social Democrat had re- j 
ceived 53.8 percent of the vote to ; 
defeat Defense Minister Elisabeth - 
Rehn, who had 46.2 percent in the , 
-runoff dectkxL About 82 percent ? 

■ of the Finnish electorate voted. j 

Mr. Ahtisaan is a seasoned dip- \ 
iomai who has held high positions 
at the United Nations, inducting 

undersecretary-general for admin- 

■ istration and management. At the 
'UN, he was best known for over- 
seeing Namibia’s transition to in- 
dependence from South Africa in 
1990. But he had never run for 

■ public office at home and was not a 
well-known figure in Fmnish poli- 
tics wheat he declared his candidacy 
for president last March 

Nonetheless, in first-round vot- 
ing last month he placed first.in a 
field of 1 1 candidates, besting poB- 
ticians who are longtime fixtures in 
Furnish politics. Mrs. Rehn placed 
second in the Jan. 16 ballot, which 
led to the runoff Sunday. 

S> Analysts said that Mr. Ahti- 
saarfs snd den popularity owed 
; m uch to the sharp recession that hit 
Finland's economy m 1991, largely 

as a result of the coUap« of rinding 

ties with the former Soviet U nion 
and the aftershockof a spisidjng 
' and l ading spree in the laic-1 980s. 

Joblessness, traditionally 5 per- 
cent or less, soared to more than 20 
•percent as output and living stan- 
dards fefl. Most Finns have been 
spared real hardship by the coun- 
try’s extensive social welfare sys- 
tem But Mr. Ahtisaan used the 


economic decline, 'to his political . 
advantage in the late stages of the 


- -rr 

to the government to spend more to 
redriw dnemploymenL ; ' j y-* 
^ Under Finland's, constitution, 
the .president, has spine influent* 
but lktk actual control over eco- 


to be Mr. Ahtisaarfs 


He is a strong supporter of Fin- 
is n<Ts application to join the Enro- 


4 he country’s [economy closer to 
Europe’s! ^ a mave.woultf.haye 
T jcct unthinkable during the. Com 
War, when Finland avoided any 
alignments that would provoke 
Moscow’s ire. . 

Shortly before the nmoff eke- 

dcmj^-Mr. Ahtisaan said that many 
new European security order, care 
should!* taken not to leave Russia 
outside." 

Mri Rehn, the 58 -yatr-oId de- 
fense minister, also supported -.-EU 
membership. She was seen as 
sliditiy more conservative on fiscal 
iriattgrti- but in most respects the 
two candidates were not regarded 
as far apart on -the issues. 

A member of Finland’s small 

ethnicaDy Swedirii minority, Mrs. 

Rehn was 'supported by .many 
young people and- professionals, 
who saw her as a competent profes- 
sional and a fresh face who would 
represent 'Finland’s interests well . 
But she seemed to tire in the cam- 
: paign’s late going as Ml Ahtisaan 
1 improved his performance in tele- 
vised debates and pobfie penor- 
' mances. • 

' Mr. Ablisaari will become Fm- 
, land’s third president since 1956 
. and the 10th OTcotbeNorthccoun- 
K try won its independence from 
e Russia in' 1917. 



Somalia Pullout: Envoys, Too? 

Marines Warn of Bisks il Diploroate^ Stay 

jnarura fflate , -a™ 


, would make a mockery of President Bill * 

Bv Barton Gellman Oiat the United Suites ■ 

'itashnztan Puu Senxt because its work in restoring security ts largely 

u,’ a cw i KfvroN — With US forces counting ^^^pants m the debate agree that with only a 

aag^sst 

3sSS2?a*ee 


sim. whose safety Manoo Corps otneen, ^ Aid,d or iSoai of a major 

^"o^etpioraatsth^approv^ J* SETS* 

month humSutarian intervention uinds doj-n. United States has recently agi^o p 0 

U.S. commanders are so preoccupied with meunj.) helicopter gunships and annorM t«>°P 

that they have banned Americans from mosl ■ to the contingents from ^ ^ force _ 

Somalia and are transporting them out erf the commy ^ lo remain in the 20 .UUU-stron& 
on a leased Greek cruise ship for fear that transport Mission 


Greek cnA* ** for fear ihm transport Mfeaon 

of 50 iroopT conoo, oosoro Use safety of a ^ ^ tawm^nnaDy 

opennons oftofor 

■fc ^ am throuj 


posts around the world, wrote to 'Ambassador Retard nmm ^ combauve 

W^Bogosian that bis security tried in the : three years under Secretary 

fOT “ nm,U “ 8 0Pera ^ ^ to the more caution 


Saaagn-AFP 


ADIED TO PRESIDENT Peorie 


“H^medicted that Mr. Bogosian would require 
emLiS^' evacuation from Mogatahu wthm 30 to 
60 davs if he remained after the U.S. pullout. 

Thou eh considered alarmist by some tmhiary and 
civilian “leaders, the memorandum has received cabi- 

the safety risks are. strong poling 
and pofcv motives io leave a diplomauc 
in the Somali capitaL Stale Department officials con 
teid that they would have a valuable role m helping 
broker a reconciliation among warring clans. 

“ other officials say the withdrawal of diplomats 


UOUS U « 


versial stance for the peacekeepers. 


POLICY : IPs Idealism vs. Profits 

be the one to have to sort out these ^uyLh^romeet towmanothff 

tmi gh choices. Hecame into office- renewal tkria June; | 

nreadring two themes on foreign Jhese included accounting for 
tvdiev: that he would give a higher . ^utical prisoben,-aBcwmg -them 


Bush adnunistranon, anauuu» Committee ot me s 

would give a higher priority w Effing the use of prison labor for 
trade in foreign relations thffli his morts to tim United ^ates. 
predecessors. Now be . is being . . So far, American officials sot, 
forced to translate that straddle ^Chinese have not done enough 

intoodicy. . . ^ ■* . atafini tbe proqiect that die ad-. 

Tk ttftA MINS nf Virtnam. Mr. Qin- irdfiht actually have to 


ton tried ib bridge the gap b*aig* 

^kmSTthe more - dnmres *ere Ac ttadeeqmvalent of 

would be to encourage tbe vitt- ^mKiear bofl ^ " ■ • . _ 

namesc to pursue .the “ises oi _ .. . ; — 

Ax ^^ n H^ I1 offidais pisses 

Conferenceon Secority 

’Clinton ^»ke, American Exmess . iteuws 

•Co. signed an a g rcan “ t ,^7;^ ; MUNICH-- The NATO seae- 
Victnamcse bankto ta^general, Manfred WOrner, 
.(ot use of ' SSSedlrij partidpationin an m- 

nam. And 1? sterivni raial inteinational security oonfer- 

in HoCbi^hGty with its mal ™ becanse of 

°S^moredifficulL6nMg sobering 

28 ,whcnMr.CJin^reMwed^ fr^n cancer, tmderwenl surgery 

■na’s fayorabkttadestat^^^ - agpto xe?nove an acme 

w . 

SKATER'* •’ Reasonable Grouttds 

■asiwtLtiSS’- 

MSasssrSB 


based upon canffict^e™^ ™^gp \a tefon* skating 
including in association after the cSp 10 *- 

'fegaaai 

— .-.gsBaras^sg 

M ? hSSdL “wb 36 a mcmb<3 ' ctf the GaiKS.uS^^ 
SSS committed an act, . ^ policy, protocol, diso- 

pSne and ^Sar matters.”^ 

Ss.'gyJgS jsaarsyw- 

sportsmanship m her relations , ■ s^Tstmemott of dh^gs 

Harding, Lxordmgto 

STroi^iire Nancy Mr.HybL . . 

LwabontaftojW^^ , Ms. H 


false statements ^ - ■ iwly.theassocmtwnw^^- 

Mae concenticB lL > set a plKe and date for a bor- 

at the earfifist possibk bn* 6 /... 

five-member P®“ e, y1? Olympic The pnrpwe 

CSSfiB 1 ? s£“rg 

in the USOCs court . i-* y\ssooauoaS code of eilras 

• janfsssr? ~ Ssss-^SB 

aaagggsaj; 

There w ®ISSL*i sfteis.' : 


the wuuer v-. 

Mt Harding's membeisny OQ' tne | 

niithfft meJmrisdiction. of the 





global fund management 

which Way are the Markets Moving? 

T ,U , \P1 RTS DEBATE THE TRENDS AT THE BOLDER GRAND HOTEL 
11U 1XP1R 1N U R1CH ON MARCH 23 & 24 - HHM 


_ _ — ^ TXITFUN ational herald tribune 

investment coneeeence 


MARCH 24 


THE EMERGING MARKET SESSION 

Robert R-P- Michaelson, Global Chief Investment Officer, 

Citibank Global Asset Management, London 

Paul Barker, Director, Institutional Client Services, Standard 

Chartered Equitor Group, Singapore 

Maria-Elena Carrion, Vice President and Head, Latin 

American Investment Team, Bankers Trust, New York 

Gary Kreps, Chief Investment Officer, GlobalFixed Income, G.T. 
Capital Management , Inc., San Francisco 
Stephen Swift, Head of Global Equities, Credit Suisse Asset 
Management Ltd., London 

Henry D.C. Thornton, Investment Director, Credit Lyonnais 
International Asset Management (H.K) Ltd., Hang Kong 
Philip L. Tose, Chairman, Peregrine Investments Holding? 
Ltd., Hong Kang 

luncheon address 

Roger Nightingale, Investment Strategist, Latlnvest Securities 
Ltd., London 

THE EQUITY SESSION 

Nicholas Knight, Head of Strategy, Nomura Research Institute- 
Europe Ltd., London 

Alan J. Albert. Senior Managing Director, Merrill Lynch Asse 
Management U.K. Ltd., London 

Heiko H. Thieme, President, Thieme Associates, Inc., and 
Chairman, American Heritage Fund, New York 
Beat Wittmann, Head of European Equities, UBS Asset 
Management, Zurich 

Speaker to be announced. Fidelity Investments, Boston 


REGISTRATION 


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— > *■ 

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Howard Flight, Joint Managing Director, Guinness Fhght Globa 

MdhMl 'STs.V.P., Bank Julius Baer & Co., Zurich 

EMERGING MARKETS INTO THE 21ST CENTURY 
T Mark Mobius, President, Templeton Emerging Markets 
Fund, Inc., Singapore 

S C S“»“ D m»« ««- - 

Investments International, Luxembourg 

TH r TIFRIVATIVE and alternative 

INVESTING APPROACHES SESSION 

Marc Landeau, Chairman, Olympia Capital Management, Pam 
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Lawrence D. Hite, Managing Director, Mint Investme, 

of-. 

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NASDAQ NATIONAL 


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19 49l 

•* "B« 
TO1T 

14 6*6 

S 9 » 

3*8 

ISIS 


121793 1646 
3584 1816 17*9 
93411616 1446 
45614b 1216 
20722*9 20 
12)8 ,1% 
1646 1316 
6*8 5*8 

wT T 

240* 3^ 3ft 
Bft 748 


Aoiebees 3)4 
AnlRecv 


10 

1-4 5131 
3 76482446 


4 499— 48 

'« '£+'2 

15% 1646 +)b 
59i 6V6 + 16 

12V9 12*9 

"A 

15 15—48 

ft 

» BE =|8 


510 34k 3b 
10*113*8 114k 


20V9 21 -216 

10, 10*9 + Vk 

>5 *:* 


mu 

sbsr 

AodMIcr 


*16 646 
7734* 1*»8 


Adobes 5 30 
AdvCrt 
AdvHIt 
AdvRos 
AavCIr 
Advlni 

Art v Log 

AdMhSv 
AdvPatr 
AdvPlti 
AdvSem 
AdvTUa 
AdvTcti 
AflvTlSJ 
Advan»o 5 70 

AdvaniBs J4 

AOvBCD 
Aeoufm 
Aeravr 
Aetrium 
AflnBlo 
Afvmo* 
AoSvCS 
Aancvp 


WW (8*9 
613123V, 
A 38*269, 
.7 3550131, 


10*6 11 — 148 
6'*, 6ft — 48 
1848 \8V? — *9 
1744 18 +16 

1*46 2146 +14k 
2499 25 + V9 


27 1 k 27V. —3ft 
1*8 1 *— % 


770 5*8 
9218 8to 
J 142523146 
.9 14358 2V1& 
45320 V. 
388 218 

*35 an 

188 7V. 
3184 446 
212317V. 
25719V. 
14333 13*8 


15*? 1546- V. 
33*9 3448 +1*8 

15 15*8—' IV. 

1% 1*9 — 

4*8 4./,— ft 

5*8 54* 

ift 4Vi + V, 
8 BVj— 48 
1*8 218 + 98 

16 16—99 

5V. 548 + 18 

2BV. 2* —199 


28 V. 2* —19, 
27V. 2719-1*8 
a 28M. + v. 


2*9 ?48— *8 

746 8 - H 
9 * — *9 

4 4 — ft 

16*9 14*9— ft 
1846 1**9 + ft 
1218 13*9 ♦ *8 
11V8 1146 + 48 
11*9 H*9 — ft 


Asm cog lfe .*2036312’^ 
Agcurn 1283174- 


AsrlDvn 
AlrMem 
filrSen wt 
AirScn s 
A.rSvs 
Airlron 
AVorrs 
Akzo 


153 4‘^ 
4053 *V. 
1167 
1302 15 '.4 
74) **9 
12 17 7B8 10'9 
1720 346 
1.77C 14 tax* 54’9 


AladnKn 1457 *4. 

AJamoGc JJe 21 77l4»>i 


32m li 

170 5.7 1*1 21 '* 

,10e 3 2586 2) 
20011 
174*633'i 
3901227 

M 3J 6562W. 

348 S'? 


AlfaCps 7* 2 A 217712- 


Alias R 
Ai.co 
Alteerm 
AIIA5em 
AllFOlr 
Al!C.tr 
AlesW 
AiianPti 
AlnScmi 
AiBkCaa 

AUdBk s to 2.7 H 16 
AldCooC Uto 325816*9 
AlldCaO 135c 9J *61 15 
AMCOH 172* BA 75715 
cur— . 08e 3 678 IS' 4 

5*63 14V. 

AIICGp s 52 2.1 S13 26 1 . 


2023 5*8 
13050 3. 
566 If. 
IT *4. 
307 7*8 
4730 * 46 
302*13 
37721V. 

40 17 H 16 


AMHIPd 74 \i 174115V. 
2486 21 v* 


B'm 8*4—148 
T-6 3*8 — ‘9 

134. 1346—1*8 
84. *>6 — *8 

Mil 9*8 — *8 
3'8 3'4 + S 

52 1 '. 52*6 —1*8 
8’k 5*8 — 1'9 

1P9 15=9. ♦ 46 
144- 14*8 
SOU. 31 + '.9 

20=6 2048- >8 
10*8 104.— V. 
2* 2* —3 

204. 21’.— 419 
26 264. 

4% 5*9 + *8 
10*6 12*k +1 
it*9 ipyj— 2 
T1V9 219, 

799 8*8 + '» 

14 2 % , 

1*9 t"'k— 

9V. *46 — '6 

64. 7 + *9 

B'9 * 

10*9 II — Ilk 

2019 21*6 +1*8 

15 IS 

15»8 15*8 — =8 
14% 14% — % 
14 14V. — % 

144. 144. 

1416 15*8— % 
34% 24 V, — Pc. 


ArctiPts 
ArdCOS 78 
Arden 
Arethusa 
ArmlB S M 
A rooGa IjOO 
Argos* 

Argus Ph 
Artslot 
Ar> Beil 04 
Armor M 
Arnold s A0 
ArrlsPh 
ArawFn 78 
Arawint .10 
ArrowTm 
ArtjJf 

ArtlstG .10 
ArtWav 
Ascme 
Aseco 

AspcITI 

AsoenBfc 70 
AsdBnc IDOb 
AsdCmA 
AsdCmB 
, Ajtecs 
AsnwioF 
AstrM s .12 
Astron Jlle 
Astras* 
AsrslTch 
AlCtlCSt 
Athena 
Ame* 

Atkins, 
Aiinfds J6 
A it Am 
Atl Be* 
AtICStAir 
ANGult 
All SeAr 5 72 

AftTele 
Aimel 
AirixL 
AtwdOc 

AuBon 

AUtaSv 
Ausnex 
Auioinl 
AuKams 
Autodv 
AulDdk 48 
AutoGD 
Autalmu 
Auidind 
AUtOlOl s 
Avatar 
AvhJTcn 
Avndic 

A It CM .10 


122231**k 
684 17*9 
298514V, 
10 2*8 


10V9 IMk— 188 

588 5*8 + % 
8k I + *8 
118k 12*8— 18 

W8 M4-l» 
98 188— *8 
7 7 — % 

2*9 2*9 + W 
77*6 2716 
1*8. 1*16—88 
168k 17%— 1% 
1616 16*9 — *6 


g&A 

BlkHwIB 


13V. IS* — » 
248 ZN + *• 
23*9 2SV. + *6 
44 50 « 

11 118. + K 

12*9 24*9— v, 

S lk 30% 

A 20*9— V. 
3*6 588— 16 


6488 1218 
W 3*25 
3J 92i*t* 
55 2219 
M 5% 
1*8 *4 
J 1239*44*8 
37 38842146 
23 1447 21 
1303 646 
27 18*12=6 

A 135 24'6 
143 7*9 
13588 18*6 
17 434 5% 
2611*6 
4*4713*9 
1196 7Y9 
6907 4284 
l.l 241 20 
2J 22246 
566 77'- 
824 2718 
151316*8 
153W31'i 
17 42114k 

J 350 3*8 
116 416 
1486164k 
7721**8 
517*104* 
127 6% 
576 *% 
31 16% 
700 289 
607 64. 
3096 8% 
ieaii'- 
5 1082038*, 
7477 13% 
1420237*8 
771 8b 
12511% 
4416 25% 
11S1S t • 
2361510 
3158 4*9 
645 70 
3J 72 8 
103341052 
116513% 
2IZ* TV. 
640* JT 9 
34254 248. 
2721 36% 
194(3526 
1*12 8 
1J 1*08 6*9 


14*8 14% + % 
21 21 % + *6 
70 20 — % 

616 6*k— *k 

12 124k + V* 

23 *k 23' k — V. 
7 7V. + % 

164* 1716 — 16 
5=8 5*9 — % 

nv. n% 

12 12—44 

5*8 7*9 +1 
37 37 -5% 

1844 1084 — 4k 
344k 36 +1% 

26 26%— *9 

26% 26% — 4k 
15*9 16 + *8 

29*9 2*8. + % 
11*9 11% + *4 
I4k 3% + 89 
4 4 — % 

13% 14%— 148 
17*8 17%—? 
*% 9*i — % 

S=k 6% + =k 
lb *4. 

14% 14% —2 
Z'« 748 — 

6% 6% 

74. 78k — ’A 

10=8 10*8 
34% 36% +148 
12% 12'4 — % 
35=8 36*8 + =s 
6% **»— 1*9 

11% 11*9 
22V. 23' 6 -18. 
t S k 1 **— % 
84. *% — *8 

4V« 4%— % 

17% 18% - % 
7=8 7=8— % 

48'k 48% — V. 
11% 11%-?% 
6% 6=k— % 

28% 32 +3 

l*4k 23*9 +1*9 
34% 36 +1*9 

22% 23% + J* 

7% 7% + V. 

5 =k 6 + % 


s 1J4 
_ vn XJ 
BoajRs 
Bodyor 
BoUmgc 
BanTan 
Book Ml II 
BaoteB 
Boom twn 
vlBoonEI 

BStt ^ 

Boat Ac 40 
BosIBc J6 
BoaJChCk 
BMlTc 
BlvaBc JO 
BoxEn A 
BOxEn B 
Brody W AS 
Brontre JO 
BrntdSv 
Brains 
Brkwf g 
Bronco JO 
vIBrendi 

BrdoF JO 

Brilev 
BrllBlo 
Brood N 
BrtBadTc 
Bdcstln 
BrdPon 
Bdwvse* 
Brock .16 
Brack CS 
BTOdSt 
Brook sin 
Brktree 
Brofetri 


” 4 <fi 346 
47% 
_ 27 

484 416 

127* *% 8*9 
11V. 10% 
7 6*9 

3=8 TA 

1281 716 6=k 
51 1 

’"gfa f 

u '«?'! ' j * 

7 248 2*9 
14% 13 
1*9 1% 

2*1 1*9 1*8 
12 3V9 3*9 

4133 7% 1% 

’* =4*6 3416 32 
3512% 10=6 


524k + *k 
4*8 — Vl 
13*6— *8 
27*9—1 
4% — % 
8=6 + *9 
12'A — 46 
20 + % 
47% — *6 
*=k +188 
3119-2 
1546 + % 
5?h + *8 
2*8 
4% — 
3546 + 4k 
17*9 + 46 
178k— Ml 
1696 + *6 
12 % — 1 % 

as-'* 

1288— 8k 

k-k 

8 

3*8 — W 
1146—1*8 
4*9 + % 
4716 —4% 
27*8—4% 
488— % 

»=a 
1188+1 
6*9 — % 
388— *8 
7 - % 
688 — % 


CoroFsl 

CorsPIr 

Carver 

Cascde 

Caseys 

CasnCrd 

CasnC wt 

CasAml 

CasinoDS 

Cosmos 


CohiRsc 

CastlEs 

CataiSem 

Catalyt 

'--thBcp 


70b 1A 44 I3V9 
12078168. 
242 3*t 
A0a 23 I3721*k 

.15 A 3875 25% 
1286 *48 
26* 3 
9159 27% 
155224% 
2270017 
735 1*9 
843 488 
127711 
2285 546 
*50 7 
A0 4 A 16*14*9 
877516 

.10 A 2045*16*9 
*117 1 
1251 *9 
1786 
416 
’430*9 
_J4 28W 
2*37 7VH 


12% 1286— =6 


15*9 14 + % 

24k 3Hi 
20 21 

23% 2348— IV. 
888 9*8 

7% 288—% 
25*9 25*9-1 
2296 2346— 46 

^ Wt* 

4 4% + 16 

10 10=8 + 88 
5% 5*6 — % 

6% 7 

13*1 13V,— *9 
13V9 15<A- 46 
15% 1546— 88 
148 1 - 


StriesM Net 

100s High Law Close Ota 

J6 U 447422% 2116 2146— V9 
120*81448 13*8 1388-% 
2510 5 4*9 488— *8 

3500 6% 546 546— 46 

.10 A 587*0 18 18 -146 

97*1 1618 1288 14% +1% 
7«3 188 148 1 — 

* “ 8*S,k 1% lk-188 
^5% aTS 

99*334 3T8L 33 +86 

9*812% 10% 10% —1% 
18833 5% 446 446— *t 
1310 5% 5V9— % 

773*1488 1348 1388 + % 
5757 * 788 781—146 

22V, — % 
1% 

648 — 4k 
8 —188 
7*8 — 48 


16 16 V.— % 
3% 3%— 48 
28 MV9-2W 
27 27 — =6 

6=8 6%— 48 
17*9 18 —1 

23% 2fb— % 
1*46 1*48- 48 
33% * +246 


Sales In Nett 

IBM High Low Chase Ch'ge 


Sates In N«t 

TOM HMi Low dose ChV* 


Soles In N? 

UOt High Low Close CWg* 


12*9+46 

f* -8* 


548—% 

1 — % 

2 - % 
11 — % 
4% + % 
288— % 

13*9- % 
1 % 

1*6 + % 

K + % 


3, £ i2 

nt.BC U7M1.4 

13*9 

5% 


.6*9 16V9-46 

*V9 *% 

11*9 11*9— % 

“El*} 


5** 

M6 + % 
1046—48 
3 - Vi 



28 15 11120 18% 18V9— 1% denzYm 

.12 13 141 10 *46 *%-+%! Seng wt_ 


301*14% 1346 
WO 44 >& 


473117% J6V9 
5*21 50*9 48*6 


TAB 2J »21 50*9 
5102 7% 
J4 15 6637 13 V9 
J4 1A 14215 


156 X4 *647% 46% 46*9— % 
iJHi 351000533% 31% 31%— 1 
Jflb 2-4 98x9*6 8*6 8*9 + % 


M 25 728330% 29% 2946—% 

AD 3J 418% U% lUi— 1% 

34 45 5WZS46 23% 23*9—1 


451536629% 2746 
IJ 6074 22*6 21% 


Br Tom 
Brunos J4 
BrymVHr A0 
Buckle 
Butteis 
BulidT 
Bui I Run 
BurnoS 
BurrBr 
BusnRc 
Butlers 
ButlrMI 
Butrey 


6074 22=6 21% 
1435 7=6 6% 

S42 146 2=8 

78010% 9*9 
590 8 4=6 

2014 20=6 20V. 
37725V. 23% 
6520 16. 

IS 6 % 

18 11426% 24% 
12409 14U. 13Vi 
73 171717*6 16 
25 107139% 38 
1210148 4ZV. 
1007317% 

A 47*25*6 24'k 
7224*9 20*9 
1297514% 12*9 
15 368 48 44 

IA 2261346 11=6 
811 4k 
*22 748 648 
SIS *9 

14 1667 *% 8% 

183 1% 1U 
12 83 *=k ?>6 

1*34 12*9 *% 
511*8 11% 
2 6V. 6V. 
1420631 26*9 

423 4% 4L. 

215415=9 15b 
80*11% 10V. 
1A 1468«9% 8 
628 24' k 22b 
1007138", 33% 
414 15*9 Mb 
213011'.! 10 
1240 15'A 14% 
4251 17 16'k 

*77512*8 11% 
1010867x8% 7% 

IA 17403% Jib 
75 17 I6'4 

786127 24% 

' 17=. 16V. 
I 4 * 1% 
3437 8'* 7% 


323 7b 6% 
11*135% 31% 
86* 5% 4*9 
58327=. 24=6 
228 6b 6*6 


2% + % 
» —2 V. 

1 lb — % 
28 —% 
2146 + 48 
7*6 

2=8— b 
*%— V. 
646—1% 
20b + V. 
23% —l»8 

26% +1H 
UV. — 48 
16*.— *8 
38 - % 
42*8 —1*8 
7098—1*8 
24*8 + =8 
23 —1 

13 + 'A 

46=6 +2b 
1^46 + 98 

6*9-48 

%— 

09 — % 
lb 

9b— % 
10 — 7 
11 % +lb 
6 % 

264k— l»k 
4b 

15*9 + % 
10=6— b 

9 + % 
22=.— lb 
334k— 4b 
15% +1% 

10 — 1 % 
144. + '« 
lib 

12=9 + *8 
7=9— % 
33 +48 

16b 

14% —2 

16=k + % 

I + 

7%— v s 

6% — % 

26b + V. 

6 =. + % ! 


AlldhWB 
AML He 
AitfWste 

AllSIFn 

Allirlsio 
Aloelte 
AlpMlc 
AlpAIIC <tt1 
AlDhCl 
AHantal «l 
Alpha bib 

Aiphod 
AlDhrwt 
AlpLce 
AlolneM 07c U 


03e J 263 )4V 
3396 54. 
1149 7=8 
184610 
18 44k 
2*10 T9 
*34 ■£ 
4595 15b 
43a S*9 
1532 29„, 
1818 1*4. 
52S % 
562 54k 
07C IJ 44 6% 
1564 I 
B7 34k 
*377 8% 
3723531 
413516*6 
1164 4V. 
2545 sa. 
J5e 18 13531% 


24 b 94% —lb! 
14% 1458— % 
194k 19% + 

134. 14 — % , 

5% £% — % I 

6*k 6% I 
IB 1*% +1% 1 
4=6 4V. 

’?* 2 

\ 48— "« | 

1U. 12% — l*k 
3*6 3% — 4k 

77. 27 -2 | 


AmcarF S A8 14 374 

Amrrons 44015% 


Amriofl 5 44015% 14 

fimertic J)' 1 1% 1 

AFFF \M tA S34 25*6 25 
AmFPr 106 11 J 2034 9=6 8 
AFTx£ 54 EJ 523 6% 6 
AFTkE2 .75 9 1 252 8=4 8 

Aineron Die jlSCiflflva so 
fiihSvct *85 4% 3 

AmBep ISO IA 7L 3E 34 

SButr AB 16 2*226=8 7S 

AmBioon 2737 5=8 S 

kiliu i. 

«s* * u ’5 

■»* J ? 

_ 20 13 1574 12 II’ 

AFllirn » 15 22A9,. Z7 

Atr.Fral s 30*i Iflb ip 


ABnkr AS 
AmBioon 
AmSusm 
AmCIW 
ACiuim _ 
AColoid* JO 
ACortsu „ 
Amfcol 
AmEHl 
AmFB 
AHlirn *6 
ArrFrgl s 


AO r«r»5 JO 1717*84 31% 
AHIHlCDS »3B4?4VS 


AmHoid 

AlntJF 

AntinPrrt 

A/nlnPli 


449 1% 
.9 17744% 

16577 . 
5798 lb 


AmLIe Pf 216 BJ 10326% 
227230*6 


AMS 227220*6 

AMedE 

AmMDSat I S* 3 S 

AMcbiie 130713 

AMI ins 7J0 4J im?SJb 


AffQllfOV 

AmPoc 

APhvG 

APwrCrs 

ARev 

Air.Recr 

AmPesId 

Am Sot Pa 

ASeFL S 

ASrti 

ASludlo 


730 ? 
363215b 
375 2',« 
2722573% 
J? 14 38* 6% 

75015b 
161020b 
103812% 
378 19% 
J2 5* 6% 

OB li 1072 5'A 
84033% 
171623% 

1374 14 
1534 6 V « 
I7TT6 


r, i% 

% % . 

5 5*9— % 

Sb 5b —1 
1 158 — 

2% 3=8 + % 

7% 8 — % 

»T» 77b— 3% 
13b 14 —1*9 
4 4 — W 

4b S’* — b 
29% »*. +1*6 
19b 19V. + '6 
(4 Mb — % 
1% 17» + '*» 

25 25 — Ji 

8=8 * - *8 
6% 4% — % 
8 Sb + b 
SB=k 64*. +4 
3 t + b 
3**9 38 +1% 

2STk 26=8 + % 
Sb 5 — 

171k 17*i— % 
30 30 -I 

Vt* 2% — 

18% 19 -S 
3 1% + % 

W, II +1 
A ft- 

lib lib — b 
27 27% +1 

IP'S 17%— b 
30 30% * % 

a 3* + b 
1=8 1 — % 
11=6 13=6— b 

1% 1 + 

26=8 2i% 

18% 10=8— lb I 
12% 13b- «• ! 
10=6 I**- +1 i 
14% 14'%— 3% 
57% 51=6— % , 

0=k 8% + % 

14% ISb + =6 

2% 2*6 + % I 

21b 22% * =■ ; 
6% 6% + % 
Mb 14=6— b 
19b 20b +1 
11% 12b 
10=6 10b— % 
5b S% . 
4% 4% — b 

30% 33 + % 

am 2iv* —2b 
13% 13=8— % 
5V9 5=8- 
M» i5=6 


BB&T UM 
BE Aero 
BE1 El .08 

BEI .ISe 

BFEnt 
BF5NY 
BGS A0o 

BHA .140 

SMC F/l S HE 
B1 Inc 
Bisrs 
BKCSem 
BMC sir 
BMC Wst 
BMJ 
BNH 
BP1 PkQ 
BPI wt*4 
BPI wtW 
B59BC9 .76 
BT Fin 1.12 
BT51» 

BTU inr 

BW1P J2 

Bobooe. 

aactrinf 

BociBor 

BodgrP 

Boiiev 

BkHgwt 

Baker J 06 

Baicnem dJ 
BldLvBs .40 
BaldPfa 
BdirGm 
Baiiek 

BamPune LOO 
BcOnegfOJO 
BncFitORJ* 
BncfStOM 1.72 
Eon cl ns 
BjkGoIIc 3tr 

BCD Sou UWj 

BcpNJ A0 

Banetcs 
BandaM .*6 
Bondont J9e 
Hk South J2 
BkGrans M 
BnkNH JWe 
Bar KAN JHr 
BnkLItd .lflh 
BrtkUf of 
BkUtFof 
BkWorc JO 
Bonkrs s .40 
BnkFst )0e 
Bkntn M 
Santa, S2 

Bant MJ 


3J 3754 32% 30% 
835171b I0=k 
u 329 e% i>. 
1.9 5094 9 7 

449 4 }=i 

60218% 10 
13 79 27 25 

IJ 55511=6 10 
J 6207 74% ZJb 

3513 6 5 

53W19=k 19 
3 5=. S 
3279964% 57=6 
830035V. JOb 
303 9 8*6 

2B40 7 1=6 

1489 5% S% 
165 1% 1% 
47 1% 1=8 

3 J 482 24 23 

3A 63 31% 30*6 
367 3=k 3% 

1741 Z=8 2 

1A 51*7 70% *9*9 

168811=6 10b 

2046 3=8 Jb 
707119b 18 

1531J% 12% 

396916 14% 

37* 

J 8652 19=8 17% 
A 14 5=9 5% 

25 150215b H 
417 l« 
1159*%% 13b 
20 8% 8 
17 144432 31% 

13 264768 65b 

1.7 26214b 13b 
35 1449 40 

179 6=6 « 

7 539245*9 41b 
34 232 31% 29% 
30 5230b 20b 

397322b 21b 
40 317 16b ?5b 
13 47 25% JSb 

13 10867 16*4 15b 
13 12(31 30 

.4 413 109 IP 
A 131313b 17b 
U 177 8b 7% 
3110b 10b 
9011b 10% 
A 62*33% 33% 
2J 2135 18 16b 

A 374 19b 18 
3J 310 37% 19 
IJ 334437b 35 
10« !!? 


BonvRT jo 

BonynSr 

SareR 

Barra 

BorertBus 

BaretRS 

BsTnB rf 

BsTnA 

BasPtr 

BasEml 

BasetFi JM 

BatTech „ 

BoyVw AO 


979 l*k 1% 
8.9 340 4% 4% 

105=415 M 
40732b 32 
1077 7 6b 
100616b 16. 
467711b 10=6 
127 3% 3b 
129* 9b #% 
410*8 39 
28«8l2b II 
IA 1344 34=8 Jib 

35283 7 6 

7JS 26702: 21 


30b— 1% 
It — Ik 
6b— b 
8 + "*. 
Jb + % 
IB — v, 
26% +1 
lib +1% 
2* — 1% 
5 —1 
!*b 

5b— % 
57% —6% 
31% +2% 
8U- % 
1=6 — % 
5=9— b 
lb — 
1 = 8 — *9 
74 

31% + V, 
3%— % 

I — b 
19b 

lib — b 
3b— b 
It'l 
ljb-l 
14^— b 

1**8 +1 
5% 

15*. + % 

10 

15b +7V* 

B 

31% — % 
66b — 1% 
13% - b 
49 +J 
f — b 
44% +2*8 
30 — b 
70b 

22 % + =8 
16 + b 

25b- 'A 
I5”k- '% 
30 -1 
18 

12b— % 
7%— b 
10=6 

11 + % , 
33b + % 
17% * % 
18 - % 
19 —lb 
35 - b 
l + 
it - % 
4% 

MW — % 

K*i 

ib — >6 


11% + b 

re — % 
0%- % 
19% 

12 — % 
31b -7% 
6 — % 
21 % *■ =8 


I CBrewer 
CBBnc 
| CCA 
CCB Fn i 

C co C S R Cdt 

sir 

CF BCD 
CFI Pro 
CFSBS 
CHCHei 
CI5 Teh 
I CMC Ind 
CMC int 
CMS Dt 
CNB 
CPAC 
CRB 
CPI Aero 
CPI wr 
CSB Fn 
CSF Has 
CSP 
CTEC 
CTLCf 
CUBnc 
cwDsm 
Caumax 
CffixJtM 1 
Codies 
CACI 

CadbyS 1 
Cade'n 
Codrmj, 
Caere 
Culm 
Colgene 
CaiAmo 

coibrc 

COIlfCul 
CoiFnd 
CMMD 
COIHUC 
Cal SB? 
Caiwtr l 

Co low OY 

Cohimei 

CemNta 

Cambex 

Cam Bio 

CcmfiNc 

ComBTdi 

ComnaE' 

CMncB 

cwtneA 

Cnnoelo 

Cgnaiess 

CannExr 

Can n Ex 

Ctinoni 
Cunonie 
Camiar 
Cantos 
Conibry 
CanyRs 
Cany nt 
CCBT 

CgpBne 
Cansvas 
CopSw 
C onti Be 
CopTrs 
Coraustr 
CardStic 
CrtmiD 
CordPl 
CVIS 
Content 

CoreGg 

Coretine 


36i; 5V? 
ij79ri3b 
544 8% 
I 21315% 
712 7b 
I 741 17V. 
9343 15=8 
2912 25b 
! 234 9% 
I VW9% 
13 10% 
i 787x3 
7% 
33b 
9*k 
... 4b 
3831 3% 


15 16% +1% 

37 32‘Vl + *k 

7=8 r.« + =9 

36 36 — b 

17b lBb — b 
3iv» 3§b— > 
3% 3%— . 

12 17 — % 

24 I«% —1 

13', 13b 
17b 18'9— *9 
8% 8=9 + =8 ! 

3 - % 
9'« 9b— b 
8 Bb + b 
1% 1% + % 
33b 33b + b 

8 i'-a + % 

25 75 
8b 8% 

1% J'k — b 
12% 13 

20b 21 - b 

9 9 

29% 29% —lb 
11% 12b + b 
6b 6b— % 

13 11 —1 

12b 12b— % 

5% 6=8 + >8 

«S 4b + b 
5% 6b + % 
30 30 -1% | 

Ub ?4 — b 

9% fb 
5 5%— % 

11% 12 — 1'« 
7b T*! — % 
|4% ISb + % 

7 7 

16b IT 1 . +1 
13 17% — 1 ' e 

22b 23 —2 

8% 9% +1 

37b J7% — =8 


FMBk S 1.12 
ordn 

S'* % 

CJerFns A0 
CtrMine AO 
CPoFln M 
CRsUe AO 
CnSprn 
OISou 
CntvBC .10 
CtrvSo J2 
Cenftln 
Cerdyn 
Certico 
Cerner 
Cervecer A3s 
ChdNOTo • 
Ohaharw 
Chompls .16 
ChnwPr 
Chonln 
ChrmSh Jn 
OtlFSB Aft i 
ChrtFdi j 
ChlGH 
ChtOnFj A0 

Chat Ben .12 

Chatrm 
ChkTrti 
Checjcr,, 
Oieckmtr 
Cheeseck 
Chin Dm 
O unTiTi 
Cnmtab 
Chemtx 
ChmFln WO 
Chmpwr 
OwvCd 
cnesEng 
ChestVs 32 

ChDaCk M 
OHOJSS 
OllldDh 
Olfcacom 
OilssTc 
Chiron 

Chimes *0 

ChcDrg 
ChcOr tit 

Chalcs? 

Oircfl 
Oiramd 
Clmco 
antiFtis 1.12 
CrtiMk 
Clntos 
Ciorlaj 
OrcFn 
Clrcinc .90a 
Orcon 
CJrcSy 
Cirrus 
Ciscos 
at Feo 
OtatnCot 
CtzBco 1JS8 
CfzSnat 
CtzBkg s .76 
Clt trine 
CtxNaft s 
am i ns 
CrvHkt 
axicBc 
CtOvEng 
ClecnH 


Ml 5% 
IJ 27327 
3A 862 26 
14 8817 

13 74314b 
20 29522b 
50 520 8 
2214b 
1099 6b 
393 4 
6813b 
354219=6 
70 3b 
1 3*8 
456249% 
14 1012734 
341 4b 
160 6 
.9 714 19 
47 4% 
IDS 6% 
A 73181 lib 
JL» 21323% 
72014% 
flOlOTBb 
2J 4934 19% 
1.1 6511b 

1392 8% 
3016 4% 
3*43011% 
793610% 

*90137 
2504 6 
2943 6*9 
24613 
837 


I Hi 

23% 25% +1% 


16% 14%-1!* . 
13% 13% — =8 

21% 2i%— n 

7b 7*9 + b 
13b Mb +1 
Sb 6 + b 

3b 4 + b 

12b 12=6 
76b Mb— Zb 
2 % 2 % . 
399 3*8— % 
44% 45*9—3% 
31V9 32% +1% 
4% 4% + % 

5b 5b— b 
17V9 Mb 
4=8 4% + *9 
0 % 6=8 + b 


10% IT *9 — % 
27b 22b— % 


9% 9b— % , 

2% 2=8- % 
7b 2b— xe 
32% 33*9— % 
8% 859- % 

4 4=9 + '4 

3 3 — =9 

7=6 7b— b 

Ihii ?7% 

16 10b + % 

Mb »>«— i 
27% 77% -1 | 

3*9 VI - % ! 
2'i 7b — *9 ( 
iri 12% -3 

12'6 1?6— lb 
72*8 72T9— tb 
3% 4V, +1% 

IU W- =9 
0% 0% - % 

3=6 ^9 + % 
16. 1=8 + % 
72"? 22% — b 
% %- 
20b 70b 
12% 12% — =6 
3Sb 30=8 + % 
9b 10b + % 
IS is - % 

i7b irk — % 

3*% 35 

*3 44% +)kg 

*2% XlV 

II 11% —I i 


CJevifn 
CIHDr 
CltDrot 231 

amot 

ainicm s 
amte 
amtr 
aam 
auecor 
CoOoBk .10e 
crane 
cranet 225 
CstHIth 
Cctjcnai -M 
Caere El 
Coora 
CoccBtt AB 
Coamsvs 
CseeEn 
Coded I 
coftexio 
Cconexs 
Coongsg . 
CchOMl .i*e 
Conemr 
CofroEn 
W«*R 
Cotooen 
Cal BCD s AO 

Collins 
cBcapA tC 
CoWIGos 1J4 
CoMGp AO 
ColBnk 
CoiFm 
Camajri J* 
Cuiii.CO 
Comcsr 5 .09 
Cmc so s .0* 
Comcxj 
CmotHds 
Comotgi 


Cmc 
CmcBfIJ A0i3 

CmBRj ptju 

CnB.VO S AC 
CmcSVA Ms 
CmClr JO 
CmCIrB JO 
CmeeGp 
CmcBOR 30 
CmcBNY «e 
CmOBsh 
CmBCol A3 
CmrFtJi 
CwItFtJ! 
CmCbiNC .9,1 
Cominff 
ComEnt 
ComEnA 
Comcirl 
Corns yss J3 
ComBcNY .60 
CBNYpt J3 

S? 5 '3 

.JJe 

cmtyFBFL 
ComFIHk AO 
CORIHIItl 
Com HIS v 
Com net 


00 3b 
13325 
247 6b 
4 10% 
., 65 10% 

2466917 
45*12=6 
1223*54% 
US30 6 
36079 96 
11 48949b 

1685 3b 
103 1 
M77 5% 
99324 
986520b 
470 r? 
10 345558b 
5977 12 
.4 616*34 
655 I k 
1.7 40 26 

U 36111% 
312314 
496 6% 
2414V 44% 
9836375 
A 60126% 
594 eb 
30 67530 

14 3? 
J2 B125 
53S 8 > 

16 T1710T# 

244 9% 

10 1832 

1+M 6b 
73814% 
3948 S' 
4371 5 
33 3'6 
3972 13% 
48 77b 
*70 4% 
198225% 
M 3*9 
■66813 
ZSS3 3b 
7755 17- 
A 399 16% 
102514 

17 36226 

744743 

79 3S 
3312 2% 
TC996J3b 

16 613 35% 
319 5b 

mi 5*9 
’.072 11% 
2207 17 

2T4 19 ‘4. 

24E 13% 
9 19615". 
2363 77 
6334 5 
737 4% 
4355 30b 
32 *013 aw* 
180 7% 
4 J 797 19% 
52 21723b 

2J 9453b 
263 II 
33W: 

1.0 77747*6% 

117 5b 
3 19*6711% 
J 54948 21% 

1815 
&SI 0 
2*71 4 
247 *% 
189 lb 
36 81317b 

s ic?r 

U 1 379 73b 
«J 149318b 
18*9 lg 
IJ 7 Mb 
A *3014 
26211b 
2J 9 1JJ 

6123411% 
J’4315b 
15 721 13V* 
4819 2% 
2B21 1 

3888 is" 4 
IA 2138 ilb 

4.1 2614% 

4.0 50 17’i 

17 367 30% 

13 1937b 

HI *642b 

2510 

2.9 868 Mb 
68 * 5 

931*23% 

7 9% 


17b 12b — lb 
9% 9=6 — =9 

18% 1* — % 
11 lib + *i 

7 7 —1% 

3=0 4 +9* 

10b 10%— b 
9 9 — V, 

5 35 — V. 

5% S»6 + Ik 
5% 5%— % 

11b 12% + % 
<A V,- 
41% 41% — % 
3=fc J=k-% 
24V. 24*6 — b 
5b 5b— I 
18% 18% — V. 
»b 9b — % 
12% 12b— 3% 
lib 12 + b 

*8% 48=6— 4b 
5*k 5b — % 
B6b 86=6-4 
18b 19 + b 

ry» 3% + % 
bl + b 
4b 5 — % 
27b 22b— b 
23b 24b — >4 
6b 7% + % 
55b 56*6- b 
9b 10% + % 
71b EC— 1b 
5b Sb— 'A 
34 24 — W 

lib lib— =6 
13 13<6— *4 

5% 6% + =* 
eSPt 409*— b 
70 % 71b +1U 
25b 26'A + % 
6b 6b — b 
28b 28=6— =» 
31% 32 
2* 24 - b 

8 6% + S* 

KPk 10b— % 
Bb 9b 
28 33 +5 

5% Sb— =» 
13% 13% — % 
7% 8 — b 

4% «M> + % 

3b 3b 
17 lib — % 
77b 27b +lb 

I*k ft- vs 
a-6 23% — b 
3% 3'i— *S 

i: 12% + b 

7*7 r% 

16 16b 

15=6 15b— % 
13% lft + b 
25=k 25b + 9k 

34b 3*=e— 4% 
31 32 

2% 79k— VS 

31 32b + % 

34% 34%— % 
SU 59k— % 
5=6 5% 

*■• 9b — I=k 
lib lib + ’k 
18b 19 
12=k 12=k — =B 
14b 15 

Ub — vs 
4 <4 4 b 

3b 4% + % 
26 26b —4 

Mb 10b— lb 
2b 2b— % 
18% 18% — 1 
nb 23b + Yt 
26 26 —2b 

11 11%— b 

31 31 - % 



16b— 4h 
lib— Vk 

§ =* 

= * 
12—14 
2%— ft 
7 — b 
23% — b 

i?; 


x{ 22 — T% FtChrtBK 
,S2£ *E-r» FTChrt M 18 

IMk 11*4 + H FcixBA JOn U 
■uSi ** FtfCtzF jm 39 

24% FCoIBn 35 30 

aS 17 

18% 19 —life nWfnfVJII U 


1443 4% m m— H; 

7 i?i 7 4 ir +i* 

7945. 43 43% +1. 


ELXS19 73 

|MC In J2 SA ID 
SMCON 26* 


371S +2% 
17% -2b 
5% + ft 
1 * 16 — ft 

14ft 

12ft + ft 
5ft 

ii%— a=6 

4 — b 
21b— 2b 
i*b— lb 
75% — ft 
26% +lft 

7% — ft 
17% 

45ft— 4ft 
26b— 2 
11b + % 
37% + ft 
2 ft — b 
*%— b 
32b— 1 
M 

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11b— b 
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2ft + % 
70b— % 
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2ft + b 

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22b +7% 
12% — b 

5b + *6 

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ft + £ 

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16b + b 
11 

Wft +3=6 
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Sft + ft 
3%— *6 
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Sb 

11 + b 

*ft-ft 


Esaaep jbd 

ESELC 3 1JD0 

ESSEF 

EZCom 


EZEMA JOB 4J 
EZEMB .20b 44 


EZEMB J0b4A 
EolBncs JAo 17 
EolBsh A8 2J 
EfliFd 
eoiHrd 


i% 1% „ 

lft 2b + ft 
3b 4 + ft 

7% 7b + b 
34b 15% — % 

It 18b— lft 
12 ISb 
9b 10b — b 
25b 26=6 + ft 
21 21 + b 

17 17b— 1b 

18% 19ft +lb 
16 16ft 

18% 18% — b 

a 8 »SS 8 SiS 8 = : 

C C='£ es/b, 'is p a a= 

t«* FlChrt 44 28 1116 16 16 +' 

1M« 11b + ft FOzBA JBa U 7945 43 43% + 

Z “ ?Sa3fe5%&- 

^ «p=.a @sd ss 

I FCmlBcD 141 4b 4ft 4ft — 

FCmeCps 72 U 1006 nb 21b 2*ft- 

^ pls, s iJ* ^ 

l PMLOtH 5e 17 ^lSi 1» iff— 

ISa Kb— b FIFiS* SL M 904019* 10 18% + 

*f*~2 PtFnCO 40 13 Sill 14% Mb — 
4b 4%Z% FtFnINs 34 IA 334=6 34ft 3« + 
w -a FFnWW, 77 M 80319% Mb 18=4— 

n Sb FtFnHdS AS 38 61916% Mb 16 + 


Genzywt 

GmnyTr 

Geodvn 


H5?8 pSSXS «. 

17ft + ft Geodrn JB 81 MB MS 
_«u. GcoriCK 230 lw 

_ _ Tm.S GMason .19B 1^ B219* 

663713% T2ft IS — b GoBS, k 

14215 13% 15 +1 

948724b 21ft 22b— b ^erlMed , W2 3% 

700010% WS 10 — % SZ55L M 3 v+S^Su. 

1029 . 29 29 «ft ggPKk . 

25fl isVi is 15 OftrSM- _ • T2Q21w 

Sw -evi-a ghhuG m i s 

m ~ 7 Si 

bE Jb SnetA JO 43 28317ft 


30 -2b 
12% —lb 
a%— ft- 
7% 


19b + % 
4b— b i 




r?. m 


57% +lb 
•ft— ft- 
14ft— =6 
21 %— Vi , 
26%— % 
7VS + ft- 
Mft— ft 
17ft + b 
12b— b 

20 + b 

39% —3ft 
4%— % 
14 — b?" 

7 + b 

8 


link JO U 
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7% — lft 
Mb'+’ft * 

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1" i-i sS 

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n — b ' 
27=6— ft t 


lift 17% + b K2SOT « 

7% 7%— s S 

p ^2 + % 

1 ?* u PTRiCto* 40 13 

4b FtFnINs 34 IA 

27 n Zii* FFnWW, J7 J4 

M Mi + h FtFnHdS AO 121 

* FM=ri * 30 13 

-■ . % FtGoHd JJ7e A 


wir as gs^e g 


*«««*♦* 
126% 26% 

524 24 24 +2 

293126b 25 25% — ft 


l=s 


7*i U l 

.190 LA 31 


%=»; 
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hi 

ft- ft 

24 


Ensfrx 

Eostovr JB 77 
EdtnVon 36 L6 
E CDS Cl 
Eeogen 




IF Is 

068T7% 15V 
2157110b *= 


FtMdl 

F Mid Be 

FtMdwF 

FtMlBCS 

FMWA 

FNIGa 


SBr E 


2i55?IK ^ 1 K+ 1 § 

aswa ’a+t 

J 8940 30% 39% — b 


15% —lb FNDeloi 74 34 

■an— ik i EMHitn in it 


AS 2A 50929ft 2B% 2? + b 

A0 23 33226b 25ft 26 — b 

1301 15% 15 ISb— b 

954 9b Sft 8ft + Vk 
JOB 17 612 12 12 —1 

72 33 31022 Bft 20=6—1% 

76 34 5723% 22b 22% — % 


. b Green* J4 IJ 3861 9ft 
.£ Grmfld JO0e J 329819ft 
. S GrnwAlr 877 7% 

. b GmwPfl • - 78G72 ITS 
. S GradSu JO 13 >524=6 2< 

. Vk GtevAfl 125 IJ MB0 178 
.2 SrttTCtl 25710b 9 

. £ GrWMlI 1M4 $ft 5 

Gnramn 35819 4b 3ft 

GrdRnd 9V7K 7 

i.» 74219 14b 


”+% FNIhSB 40 34 503 13b Mb Mb —% }«“*£• _ 

-=* H9“ k » m « «» ss a. * » S5rSk u 3S 7 


nwyna x m rr. ..mnii 

FfPcNfw 1482016% U% 13% —m 

E km 77-7 B940 n% 76% — b FSJPulm 248713ft 15% 13b— ft 

Eltt St -d 3431b 19ft » * FtSBkNJ JSS0 2J HZ7 25 27 +1 GO«ra 

Etec 715 fe « tnj „ 55 55“ & offifSt 

BCGOS 1327 4=6 4 4ft- S ^ 5 ffiwu 1 22 SST 5 ©state 

6151 ™ T 2 =i tSS - 1 **! nSe * 8 ' job ii 212 * 4 % 23 % 23ft + % 

Il§eri .10 22 as * «S ° VTnfan 


34B0 170 T78 — 4 

25710b 9b 10 + ft 

334 5% 5 5% 

■T9 4b Sft 4 
589 7b 7 7b 
74219 14b Mb 

Mil * 9 - b 

7216. 15% 15% — b 
35317 M M —I 


. It®* 15b 14 14ft + ft 

Gants 4293 16b 15b I5ft + b 

Gmwfc -4313 12b 12b— ft 

Gwitlnt ; 381 - 4% 4 4 — n 

Guota^ 2351529ft 23ft 26ft +3 

GnrDMt* JO SA 16525% Mb 25% — b 
Gvntfaree 061140 36ft 3* +W 


25% — b 
3* + W 




E Wrote 3006Z? 

EhixAB JOe IJ 19052 
Ektm 2051 f 

EWmd 2424 6 

EICArt *28*12? 

EltnfSv 6617 M 

ElcRetl 101 * 

ElecTel .10 M 229 8 
EFI 393*17 

EWcTek 1364 M 

E llett Be 7512 

ElronEI *210 

EiMjre* 642 6 

Embnr wl 113 1 

EmhTcll 1758 6 

Eimnex 5121 7 

Encod 5137 7 

Encore W 1283 13 

Eodwnc ion 7 

EnoBJosy 4*611 

Engvnth 1JB 11 5627 

EngVcal 271414 

EngWst 70 1* 117 

EiaexRs .1* 13 217 8' 
EngnSu *2 5 

Eng Men 405 31 

Engl Km .14 IJ 4541 17 
Cmtimg 200 r 

EnSvs 1268 »' 


24ft 25 —1 
45 4* +4 


FiSoBCP J4e u 1671W 1*% 23b +3b 

Fstsrtate 21612b lift 12b 

FtSTFtn J3e 7 156 7. 6ft 7 + ft 


is a r ss-t* s ^ m i 25 

,S!_a FTenns IA8 4J 74703Fb 38_. MW + b 


toss as at?* HffiVs a 
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n™ ,1% 111A FTf-dl-ns AB 1 J 


429% 26% 26% —3 
6*37 33ft ffi +ft 
4130ft 29ft 29ft— ft 
1630 aft- 7ft 7ft— % 
28418% M 18 — % 


J 12% 11% 11% 

18=6 18% 18=6—1% 

6ft 6 6ft— ft 

lft 1% 1%— % 

1/50 Sft 7ft 7ft— ft , 

SI 21 7ft 6ft 6ft— jfc fSSJA 

5137 7ft 6b 7 + % mSmC,? 

128313% 12% 13«, | PlBStrp! 

101* 7b 7b 7b— ft 

^ .. 49411% 10b lob— ib 

AB 5.1 5622b 21b 21b 

271414=6 14 14 — ft 

70 1* I 17=4 17ft TTft 

.1* 25 217 8% 7ft 7ft— b 

*2 Sft 3% 3% , 

405 3b 2ft 3b + ft 

.16 IJ 4541 17 I2ft 13b -3 


FIMissG 

Fstbklll 1JB 3J 
FttrdtBc 
FKcfitm 
Fttervs 


. _ 7«6% 23% im. 

880 Aft 6ft 6ft + IA 

1JB 3J 1M36% 35% 35ft— ft 

. 75217=6 16=6 lift— * 

860 7% 4b 6ft— ft 

13012Mb 19b TV% 
Z33810VV *% 9ft + ft 

225 93 121623=6 23 23ft + b 
65221% 18=6 T*%— 1% 
.17 U 3 4% 4ft 4% 

AB 27 18(18 17% 17% —T 


^Sft— NMT 
m txL— v. Ftowinr *7*6 8% 8% 

2? ffi ' FOVTKX 489120b IB 

2=t 3b + fc FdUoB J9 IA 21983 7b 4ft 

S> T B£-a FdUoA J» lA 20063 7 Aft 

S Footlnd Mb AS TOO *b 8=6 


DAM Fn 
D4NFW1 
DirHme 
DR Hart 70t 


DEPA 
DEPB 
DF8.R 
DHTCh 
DM MOt 

DNA PI 
DNAPf 2JS 
ONXCP 
DSBac 
DSC 
DSGim 
DSP 
□USA 

ovrwt 

□oloCps 
DlvJour 
DOWB 
DoirvA 

ggfca . 
Dovnonc 
Dankos 3SS 
Darakln 
DortGC .13 
DM 10 
DtoMeo 


290 9 
043 3% 
21815 
4A 196517b 
710 7 
226 3' 


*1718% 
,2715 9=6 
15558 5ft 
8A 11128ft 
519 4% 
143225% 
7245067V. 
105326ft 

ISB 4% 
653 5 
15 lft 

46414 




1 3b ?4 —lft 
4ft (ft — ft 
1*=6 19ft— ft 
l*ft l*ft- ft 
U% 14% 

7=6 73U— % 

g, 3% — ft 
3ft 3ft- ft 
1 lft + ft 
16% 16% 

W'i ?4ft 
29ft lift +1'.* 
23=6 23ft-lb 
18% 18% —lft 
10% )6\s— lb 
14ft 14=6—2% 
16ft lift 
13b 13ft— b 
lift lift + b 

h> w%— n 

19ft lSTi— ft 
» 15 — % 

II lib— lft 

7*. — ft 

I 1 * i*. + n 

ft ft — 

13 IJ —lb 
lib lift 
Oft 14% — ft 
lift 12b— % 
29 29% +1 

35“ i 35%— 1ft 
12 % 11 % — % 
?%- ft 

14 

4b «k + b 

21 ft a — b 

9'-, ?%— 1 


DtSwtCh 

DtoSysta 
DWTrrt 
DtTrNw 
DglfU 
Dotkev 

DOfTTKjr 

Doner 
otastn 
D u l u wora 
□tawten 
Dtowte wt 
DuToRcc 
Detran 

Datum 

Daurtm .91 
□avea 
asm . 
DavdsnA 

Dovox 
Dowtwan 

Day Run 

DeVry 
DebSha 30 
DeekOut 
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■* «*' * / 







International Herald Tribune, Monday, February 1, J994 


ftoge 9 


CAPITAL markets 


Italy, Spain and Sweden 

on Rates 



By Carl Gewirtz: 


Hie Fed’s move 
removes the Deutsche 
mark as & threat. 


□ally g 

. y idds «««« 

continue to converge to the Ger- 
man level, now 5.77 percent 

*^The peripheral markets 
which have room for indepen- 
dent rate cots, notably Den- 
mark. Belgium, Spain and Italy, 

will outperform Germany, — .! 

France and the Netherlands,'’ said Joanne Perez at Bahque Indo- 
aiezin Pans. She e^edally likes Italy; she sees good potential for 
the lira to nse against the mark. 

She also fikes Sweden, citing “superior economic fundamentals 
of nearly 2 percent growth, 3 percent inflation and a current- 
account surplus.” ' 

Henrik. Melph at IBJ International in Loudest «u ri ri he 
the spread of 100 baas .points between 10-year yields on Swedish 
and German debt to narrow to around 30 basis points by Year-end. 
He also predicted the krona would appreciate against the mai^r 

Gives' the project of a long period of uncertainty in the U.SL 
market and the vision of high income plus possible capital grins plus 
protection against mark weakness, analysts at J; P. Morgan & Co. 
and Salomon Brothers Inc. predicted American bond investor* would 
follow the lead -of U.S. equity investors and diversify into Europe. 

U.S. investors in fixed-income securities have lagged in drversify- 
iog internationally, these analysts said, largely bedanse the domestic 
market has provided such easy profits until now. Both groups of 
analysts said ffiey considered the move was potentially large enough 
that, if unhedged, it could keep a fid on the dollar's rise. 

At present, however, bond investors appear cautious about new 
commitments. The only real enthmnagw) is for short-term dollars, 
preferably floating-rate notes that provide protection against rasing 
rates, andhigh-quafity short-dated proersudi as the two-year notes 
issued last week by General Electric Capital Corp. Itwas priced to 
yield a scant 2 basis points over U.S. government paper. 

Merrill Lynch & Co. is to this week begin marketing a global 
bond for Turkey, which win be seeking up to $750. million for 
between five and IO years. 


% 



THE TRIB INDEX 


~ Iritemationaf He^rfd Tribune^ 127 
WOrkl Stock Mox, composed ^§g 
of 280 intemBBoneffy mveslable 12 4 
stocks from & countries, 123 
compiled by Bloomberg 

- Busfaess News. 120 l 
• ■ ■ 119 " 

Weekending February 4> 

dafyctositigs. Hi 

J*i 1992*100. US F M . T 



T F 



Industrial Sactms/Weekand dose 


2ww toaw * 

ttom daw rfang* 


2X9* 1CM* 


: Energy 1 15.11 1 US7 40.74 Capttal Goods IKffiliagt 
UBOttet 12676 122JT7 -&06 BawMatwMa i2Z321Z1.47 +0.70 
Finance m.TSI 1R3b'a» ConsumarGoodal 01 35 10t.40 -0-05_ 
•Secvfceal27.2 Ttg4.57 tUsoeOaneoua 141.26 138J3 +1^8 
TteMn (rants USL #** ***> 

■SSSRfcaaspw* 


© Wemalenri HsnWTWww 


CURRENCY RATES 


Fab. 4' 


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For tbe Markets 


P ABJS^---7be suipnse ben^aanes from the rise in U 5. 

c ? ,ccted to be the so-called peripheral 
wndmaAets m Europe. Andres Drobny at^ Fust 
Boston m London thmks Italy, Spam and Sweden will 

stsapsasassssSs^-*- 

^iS^FsssssaaBss 

onJy 15 toe income high, but thSc markets 

£ ghSgSLPg^^ 1 «*» ^ 


Europe , ^4sm 
Vulnerable 

By Cari Gewirtz 

Jamvatiamf HeroM Tnbme 

PARIS — Financial markets are 
headed for a shakeout, a reaction to 
unsettling local factors as well as the 
upset in New York after the increase 
in sharwenn UfL interest rates. 

The high-flying Hong Kong 
market is expected to take a fait. 
Andres Drobny at CS First Boston 
in Loudon warned over the week- 
end. He said the fixed fink between 
the two dollars meant that Hong 
Kong rates would have to follow 
the nse in the United States. 

Tokyo has its own problems — 
mainly uncertainty about the coali- 
tion govaiunent’s ability to deliver 
a pro mise d package of tax cuts 
aimed at stimulating die economy. 

The rise of the US dollar, 
sparked by die rate increase, could 
exacerbate Tokyo’s trade talks with 
Washingto n- The US government 
has been using the yen’s strength 
against the dollar to prod the Japa- 
nese government into action, and 
with that lever less available now, 
may turn to other tactics. 

Continental European markets 
also are vulnerable. Declines in fu- 
tures prices after the close of cash 


Wall Street 
Still Shines 

By Albert B. Crenshaw 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Even with 
the plunge in siockprices on Friday, 
the consensus on Wall Street seems 
to be that U.S. equities remain at- 
tractive investments, given weak re- 
turns in less-volatile instruments. 

This isn't enough to ruin any- 
body's weekend," said Nicholas S. 
Perna, chief economist of Shawmut 
National Corp., a banking concern, 
after the Dow Jones industrial aver- 
age feS 96.24 points, to 3.871.42, on 
Friday. The stock market was react- 
ing to a mild tightening of credit bv 
die Federal Reserve Board, which 
nudged up U.S. interest rates for (he 
first rime in five years. 

Mr. Perna said the Qiwn rise in 
die federal funds rate, which is 
what banks charge each other at 
overnight loans, was not sufficient 
to impede economic growth. 

Tbe Fed's move, meant to prevent 
inflation by cooling demand for 
loans, wifi raise some borrowing 
costs, analysts said Modi of the 
effect will be in adjustable-rare 
mortgages, they said The signal of 
an aid to the long period in which 
interest costs (fid not rise would fike- 


See MARKETS, Page 11 See STOCKS, Page 11 


U.S. Shines in European TV 

Forget Culture, Think Money, Expertise, Distribution 


By Richard W. Stevenson 

New York Tunes Semae 

PARIS — It is a busy day at Hamster Produc- 
tions, one of France's most successful television 
programming makers. Pierre Grimblat. the presi- 
dent, is putting the final touches on the musics) 
score for “L’Amour Est on Jeu d’Enf ants." a movie 
for Canal Plus, the French pay-television service. 

Production is about to begin on an installment 
of "Navarro," a iong-running police scries that is 
among the top-rated shows on TF1, the biggest 
French station. "We are story makers and story 
tellers,'' said Mr. Grimblat, evoking traditions 
France has fought to defend against what it views 
as American cultural imperialism. 

Yet Hamster is one-third owned by Capita) 
Cities/ ABC Inc., the parent of the ABC television 
network and one of tbe largest American media 
companies. Capital Cities/ ABC does not interfere 
with Hamster's creative decisions, but the compa- 
nies work doseiy in almost every other way. from 
exchanging scripts to hunting for acquisitions. 

There is no day when we don’t say, ’What 
would ABC have done?" Mr. Grimblat said. 
They are so modem and so knowledgeable about 
the international destiny of television.'' 

Fiance may have won a great victory in the world 
trade talks late last year by heading off UJS. de- 
mands for the European Union to drop its quotas 
and subsidies and throw open its maikeii for movies 
and television programs. But Europeans are just 
tiring tbe scale of a quieter but more far- 


, American invasion, one that has seen com- 
panies trom tbe United States infiltrate nearly every 
comer of the European tdeviskn business. 

As tar as television goes, the GATT negotiations 
may have missed the point. No longer does the 
U.S. entertainment industry view Europe amply as 
a place to sell what Hollywood makes. 

Instead, American communications companies 


from Tune Warner Inc to Turner Broadcasting 
Svsiem Inc~ Tde-Canmtinicarions Inc, Viacom 
toe, Walt Disnev Co, Cox Cable Communications, 
US West toe. General Electric Ca’s NBC Capital 
Goes and others are rushing to invest in the fast- 
growing European television industry. 

In European broadcasting. American media ex- 
ecutives see a business that is being transformed 
rapidly by its evolution from an era of state owner- 
ship to an age of commercial television and ever- 
increasing viewing choices. 

They see a huge need for money, for technical 
expertise and for programming —all of which UJS. 
xunpanies can provide. And they see a huge market 
— 350 milli on people in the 12 major West Europe- 
an nations, and 650 mfllioa overall west of Russia. 

In most cases, American investments have been 
made through joint ventures with eager European 
partners and in full compliance with limits on 
foreign ownership. 

But there is no doubt that U.S. companies are 
p lay ing an increasingly influential and potentially 
sensitive role in Europe by virtue of owning ail or 
part of tbe pipelines through which programming 
is delivered, as well as by having a hand m m a king 
the programming itself. 

The po&abOity that dominance of distribution 
networks by Americans will ultimately squeeze out 
domestic progr amming has created an environ- 
ment in which a backlash seems increasingly possi- 
ble. 

Last faD, France and Belgium haired Turner 
Broadcasting from distributing a service on their 
national cable systems, asserting that they not 
meet European Onion requirements that a major- 
ity of programming be locally produced. 

But the Turner networks can be seen in 100,000 

See TV, Page 11 


China Expects an Inflation Jump in First Quarter 


Sbombetx Business New 

BEUING — A countrywide 
spending spree to welcome the 
Year of the Dog is expected to pash 
China’s inflation rate to a new high 
in the first three months of this 
year, even as new restrictions on 
lending cut bade construction 


work, tbe official China Daily re- 
ported Saturday. 

Citing a report by the Stale In- 
formation Center, the leading fore- 
casting unit, it said the retail price 
index is expected to hit an annual 
rate of 14.3 percent in tbe first 
quarter, compared with 13 percent 
for all of last year. 


Bombay Notebook 


Bringing It Home 
To Buy a House 

Money From Hong Kong 
Boosts Real Estate Prices 

Bombay speculators are counting on at least one group of inves- 
tois weighing the future prospects erf India against China to drive the 
local real estate market to snD greater heights. 

With wide economic reform under way and full canvmabiHry of 
the rupee fikdy within two years, investment flows from expatriate 
Indians scattered around tbe world are expected to gain strength. 

Any difficulties for Hong Kong’s Indian business community 
coold hasten the process. Many pec^k of Indian descent who live in 
Hong Kong approach its 1997 retain to Chinese rale with trepida- 
tion, particulaxfy as some could find themselves stateless if form! to 
leave the British colony. 

. As such, news that Indian investors based in Hong Kong were 
behind a recent record price for a plot of land — nearly double 
analysts’ predictions — has set the Bombay property market alight. 

The sale^ *has upset all calculations of developers here and opened 
unlimited possibilities of tile market going haywire," tbe Sunday 
Times of India reported. 

Bombay's real estate prices have always been much higher than 
most foreigners would expect, but deals in recent months are taking 
prime residential prices to Tokyo and Hong Kong levels. 

New apartments bring built by the National Center for the 
Performing Arts to tbe specifications demanded by Indians who 
have lived abroad recently brou^ii about 21 ,000 rupees (about S700) 
par square foot. There is talk they could hit 35 BOO rupees, keeping 
up with rapid escalations elsewhere in the crowded city. 

“1 bought my place less than two years ago for 14 lakh (1 .4 mEDion 
rupees)," said Ashok Agarwal, general manager of Buena Vista 
Tdeviaoo (India) Ltd. T could sdl it today to 45 lakh. Bat what 
good is the money to me with prices going higher?” 

How to Drive Tlwm to Soft Drnik? 

Despite a difficult history in India, global soft-drink makers stifi 
have a thirst for deal-making and expansion. 

Coca-Cola' Ox, baric in India afto a 16-year exile imposed 
because it refused to reveal its secret drink formula or divest 60 
pezeeot of the company, recently paid $60 milHon far Parle Exports 
UtL, tbe makers d Thumbs Up cola and other drinks. 

Now, accordhig to several reports, at least foor multinational 
beverage manufacturers are woamg Duke's, which controls major 
sections of Bombay's market. 

Some simple arithmetic explains the scramble. In the United 
Slates, as average person consumes 265 savings of soft drinks 
annually; the world average is 80. In India, where more than 250 
milli on people have been identified as middle class, the average is 
three cans or bottles per person a year. 


Ne^tjaiBigMliie New Raj 

Hyin g down tbe saying “India has potential; India will always 
have potential,'' is partiauy in the hands of tbe Bombay Gub, a 
group of powerful busness executives who first gathered in Septem- 
ber in the Brivodere Room at the Oberoi Hold. , 

- Tndwn Qommcto e wtictflsed the end of tbe “license raj, the 
pemasaansystem centered in New Delhi tint interfered with neatly 
every aspect of busucss management. Executives also have savored 
the prospect of taxiettotioas, a fiiBy convertible rupee and the chance 
to invest in the strongest of state-owned businesses due to privatiza- 
tion. 

But a loss of protection from foreign competition and capital has 
stirred some of to country's mest powerful businessmen into acaon 
as India beans to ignore self-reliance in favor of global competition. 

AremnE to a‘Tevd okvurc firid.’’ a eroto tod bv a scooter maker, 



ctwroetition in a largely dosed market of 906 million people. 

“They don’t want protection^ but foreign investois should not find 
it easier than theydo," said KJL Modi, deter brother of BJL Modi, 
who beads the tobacco^ tea and televison divisions of tbe sprawling 
family company. 

luteal businessmen want changes' to capital gains taxes that now 
favor international mvwtms, regulations that cap foreigners’ hold- 
ings in businesses and a sknrer pace of opening to direct investment. 

Kevin Murphy 


The weeklong festivities sur- 
rounding the Feb. 10 Chinese New 
Year will help boost retail sales by 
28.6 percent during the first quar- 
ter, compared with the same period 
last year, the report said. 

As factories increase production 
to meet demand, industrial output 
will be 22 percent greater than dur- 
ing the same period a year earlier, 
the report said. Recent salary rises 
for stale employees and the gradual 
freeing of oil prices will add infla- 
tionary pressures, it added. 

In response to rising prices, the 
government said last week said it 
was banning new construction per- 
mits this year and freezing loans to 
nonstaie projects. 


As a result, investment in fixed 
assets by state enterprises is expect- 
ed to slow to an annual growth rate 
of 36 percent in the first three 
months, the report said. 

Last year, fixed-asset investment 
by state enterprises increased an 
estimated 58 percent, driving eco- 
nomic growth along at a 13 percent 
dip but also pushing inflation to a 
four-year high of 19.6 percent in 
major dues, the State Statistics Bu- 
reau said. 

China's last period of high-speed 
growth ended in 1988, when 18 per- 
cent nationwide inflation prompted 
panic buying and hank runs, fan- 
ning the democracy protests in 1989. 


■ French Join Water Project 

Lyonnaise des Eaux-Dumez 
Group said its Sino-French Hold- 
ings unit, a joint venture with Hong 
Kong’s New World Development 
Col, has signed a 13 billion yuan 
($172 million) contract with the 
dry of Guangzhou to build and 
operate a water-treatment plant. 
Reuters reported from Hong Kong. 

The French services and dvfl en- 
gineering company and New 
World, a leading Hong Kong prop- 
erty and hold conglomerate, each 
hold 50 percent of Sino-French, 
which will build, finance and oper- 
ate the plant to 30 years. 

The joint venture owns 50 per- 
cent of the plant. 


Coalition 
Near Deal 
In Tokyo 

Hosokatca Faces 

Summit in U.S. 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Leaders of Japan’s 
right-party ruling coalition ap- 
peared on Sunday to have agreed to 
reach a compromise economic 
stimulus package by Monday that 
would enable Prime Minister Mori- 
biro Hosokawa to go to Washing* 
ton for cradal trade talks with a 
reflationary, lax-cutting package. 

Kyodo news agency said the 
commitment followed a warning 
from Akira Yamagjshi. bead of tbe 
Rettgo labor union grouping, that 
tbe “endangered Japanese econo- 
my could sustain lethal damage'' if 
the tax situation were left undecid- 
ed for long. 

The coalition has been shaken by 
three days of political turmoil since 
Mr. Hosokawa’s annnouncemem 
Thursday of a new 7 percent value- 
added tax to finance huge income 
rax cuts. 

The prime minister unvefled his 
so-called “welfare rax." intended to 
be levied from 1997 on all goods 
and sendees, without consulting 
some of his chief allies. His largest 
partner, the Social Democratic Par- 
ty. threatened to walk out, effec- 
tively stripping him of a governing 
majority. Mr. Hosokawa later 
agreed to set the proposal aside. 

Coalition party chiefs went to 
work to hammer out a compromise 
that would rescue the stimulus 
measures and ensure that Japan is 
not humiliated when Mr. Ho- 
sokawa meets President Bill Gin- 
ion at Friday's summit meeting. 

He needs to be able to show Mr. 
Gmton the package and a draft 
budget to the fiscal year beginning 
in April to prove Japan's willing- 
ness to meet U.S. demands to it to 
boost spending, encourage more 
imports and help slash its huge 
trade surplus. 

Tomiidri Murayama, the Social- 
ist chairman, and other alliance 
leaders said they would urge Mr. 
Hosokawa to go ahead and indude 
planned direct tax cuts in the anti- 
recession package he must an- 
nounce by mid-week. 


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INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1994 


MUTUAL FUND5 


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V olAdt 20.18 —49 
WWlRC 9.S1 —47 


ivorareca Rmdic PAHYmellJM — 15 FrrankSn MsdTr: I IDS Grow: 

Evramn 1481 —14 SMIncn 9.96 —43 CcrpQual|M44 —49! BluCpP 683 —II 

Found n 1124—15 5lntGvn 948 —40 mvGrade P4.19 — .10 BandP 580 —85 

GMRen 1487 + 41 SitlnMunlai2 — 42 RteJravo 1544 —47 1 CATE P 555—83 

LtdMid n 2243 — 41 FlduCron 1943 —46 Fmtti Tempi: DSp 746 

MunCAn 1083 —43 »Woll Street Gtobl 1384 -41 Discnvp 11.96—47 

MuniFn 1058 -83 EuraEq 3296+40 Hand 1286 - 84 EwBPIP 1146 —16 

Muni Iran 1044 —43 PacBsn 44.95 +97 HBnc 11.19 +82 Extin d 483 +42 

Reflren 1186—14 SmCn 1255 —43 Fmnoal Amts: Fedlncp 5.05—43 

1377 - 04 GidbBdP 6.17 —65 


MuB P 884—04 WshAAUt P&80 — 45 
Summit 9.9? —17 AmGwtti 9.99 —07 
TeCTp 1147 — .05 AHeritsn 189—44 
TFtnt 11.06 —43 AmerNcelFmdfc 
Ulilp 1358 —45 Growth 4.19 —07 
UfilBI 1357 —45 Income 2173 —22 
VrtuBt 2158 -.19 Triflex 1544 —12 
Valu p 2)80 —18 API Gr ton 1344 +48 
wemap 1756 —47 Am Perform: 

AMF Funds: Bond, 9.92 —12 

AdlMra 9.98 —01 Equity 1189 —.18 

IntMtg n 9.91 —46 IrPBd x 1076 —10 

I ntl Lion 1042 —45 ArrUtlFd n 2249 —66 
MtaSacn 1146 —47 AmwyMutf 7.75 —.15 
ARK Funds: Analytic n 1249 —.16 

CapGrn 1082 —20 AnctiCaPf 2088 +45 
GHnconxl089 — .16 Aquki Funds 
Income 1049 —10 AZ TF 1046 —45 

ASM Fdn 104] —.16 CO TF 1079 —04 

Aoassor Foods HI TF 1185 —45 

IrtFxInnxIZJl — 40 KY TF 10.9] — 4M 

AaMortg 13.19 —II MrgnsTTF UL33 —.07 

SMIrtFx *1247 — .13 ORTF 10.95—45 
Aomin 1640 +J9 Arch Funds 

AcmFO 1342 —43 EkX 10.10 —11 


tSvAbi ZhIjb CalUSnx 1148 —46 TCmcp 10.95 

ZSXZSSSzS: » SiSL OS 


S&Pfi«d 1242 —46 TCNcrfp 1042 — 43 
Calvert Group; TCSC p l J B.17 —JO 

Ariel 3041 +45 DelGiphn® 

ArieJAP 2270 —42 Dehwl 1857 —14 
GIObEq 1845 + 41 Mcpl 7A19 —41 
Inca 1773 -47 Diehl 740 +82 
MBCAl 1058 —83 TsyRSI 980 —05 
Munlnt 1087 —82 Dataware Graop: 

Social P 3087 —31 Trend p 1389 —.17 


VrfAdl 30-18 -M TatRtn 1979—27 TxFSI 1®45 — 02 

WWInC 940 —47 vafTmn 1553—23 FtaHofGvt 1147 — 11 
SK5S 1 ExceUWte 447 +87 RnHorMu 1189—49 

TCBalp 10.17 — W ExlnvMp 8.01 +48 FW Amer Funds 
JCCorl FAMVOln 2U7 U ASMIp 10L49 — IS 

TCf^P 0.” fbl Series Brtanp 1086 —07 

TC Lot I 1685 + 74 ricko! i« in ii Fcuttv □ lui m 


BtCtxp I 19.10—41 
Growth r 1159 +.17 
HiGrfidt 1087 —83 
kfiYBdl 1 080 + 42 
Manadt 1125 +8< 
FFBLPXlCOB: 

ConApp 1187—17 
Fwfln 1057 —12 


BakaiP 1086 —07 
Equity p 1644 —07 
Eqkbc p 1045 —19 
Fxdtncp 11.11 —89 


GavBdp 981 —45 Fimdameidrt Funds i 
Inline P 1O01 — 47 CAMun np 989 —43 \ 
Lttflnc 1042 —41 NYMuniwl.18 — 41 I 


GWxdn 1377 -.041 GiabBdP 617 —.05 
Growth n 1147—411 GittGrp 7.07 +.14 
CAInt >1.13 — .05 ' Growth p 1783 —45 
FundTruSh ; HiYdTE p 479 —42 

A09tesfPl6v22 +49 msrTEP 583 —44| 
Grain tp 1641 +.15 blflp 1083 +42 1 

Gwth tp 1484 +.181 Mod R P IMS —43 
bioofpx 1080 — 861 MOSSP 585 — 84 
M0dTRfpll85 + 85 Mich P 576 —03 


USGvtfi r 1049— .10 PonGlobn 1182 +48 E 


HHncDp 986 +85 HiYMBRn 882 +-84 
IrVuGD 11.11 —12 JMGilf B85 —45 
NYTXDpkIITJ— 07 EntQliBf 846-86 
MHIDdx 1141 —46 MVMfitmi2J7 
STGvtDp 288 . MutflB 117 +81 

SmCapO 1050 —05 FaoQrB 1746 + 85 
USGDh 1000 —12 STGtaB 944 +81 
IfflDP 951 —21 MunATZI 1281 -88 


GtOpBt 12.17 —16 mflWttc 1050 +73 
WYMBfln 882 +84 MTTFBn 1084 — M 
Orta If B85 — 45 lOOOr 12.93 —73 
EntaiBf 846 —06 aTFBdplIUW —SB 
htv«6flnl257 - SmQWx 1081 —11 
MuHB 1857 +81 ScaWlCB 15v38 +48 
PaoQrB 1746 + 85 Scuddor RhKte . 

ST Gibe 944 +81 Batanced n1246— 14 


CafTxn 1088 — 87 


Genesis 870 —06 
Guoncbi n 1875 —45 
LMMatn 1045 —46 
Matatn 11.12 —21 
Must 1183— 06 

Pcrtnren 2075 — 29 


PapaStk 15JB— 17 MuGat 1159—11 
Paroaonpt MunHYt 1180 — 46 


MUFLA 1075 —07 CapGtri 3047 —40 
MuGat 1189—11 DevWopn33J2— 59 


GuHS 1649 —14 
HBd 1086 —12 
LATF 1181 —86 
STOr 1079 —07 
VrtEq x 1286—12 
VUGrx 1570 —12 


MunHYt 1180 —46 GNMAn 1583 —17 
MulnsA 1155 —07 Gkttn 2580 +40 


Munlnt 1145 —48 
MuMdt 1189—07 

MunMA 1 1113 —08 


GtSmCo 1687 +.17 
Gddn 1443 +40 
GrxdilCR 17J0 —Of 


SetSeUn 2376 —54 ! Pertakme A Sts 


UBroBdn 980 ■ 


Fedlncp 5.05—83 Omega 1785 +82 GvHncn 978 —JM 
GiabBdP 617—05 PtxA 1184 —JM MtBOn 970—09 

GioGrp 7.07 +.14 SicA 972 - ST Inc n 987 —01 

Growth p 1783 —85 TxFA %46 — .05 Stock n 1079-15 

HiYdTE P 479 —42 WridBA 985 — 88 MoBierSH 1S82 +89 

msrTEP 583— 84 | FtxBt 317J —J07 Maxu sFbnde 
map 1693 +72 1 FOAfit 1183 +J5 Equity fpnlZM +.12 

Med Rp 1245 —SB GtOpBl 1979 +.15 Inagmef 1182 —01 

MOSSP 665 —46 GvSBt law —49 Prism fpn 1049 +84 

Mich p 576 —JB hndB t 949 —07 MenKWl 1386—13 


97B —04 Ndl II n 2634 —13 
970 —49 Mditncn 358 +81 
987 —01 NchLdn 1 070 —49 


MNTEP 555-03 

Mutip 1258— .17 

NYTEp 553 —43 


MtaSeCP 1070 _ US Gov n 1.96—411 NewOp 1484—71 


isyKSi vj w — «b p us,, 1057 —12 Mun8d p 1089 —83 GAM Funds 

■TEST l?M 17 WCY 1049— W ResEqp 1281 +83 Global 16881 -80 

jomToi 5elVotuepll82 —.15 Stock P 1687 —11 Irtl 21781 -184 

rSJSfn S5 « FFBEa 1080 —18 FslBosXJx 9.75—14 FocBOS 1H46 -646 

UM IS FFBNJ 1177— 05 FstEaBlnr 1582 — 38 OEHtan5*5c 

KSrtlo 1101—17 FFTW Funds FrrtFtEx 1080 —70 DlversM nl47T — 17 

Deani P 12.01—17 uvm m cnimUi. liu nr cmw. im . 


SacBd 16.99 —18 Value p 2083 +.01 

SocEP 2286 -72 DriCTP P 26.09 —81 | 

TxFLtdn 1073 +81 Deetrl 1674—18 

TXFLnO 1774 —86 Dedrtlp 1101—12 

TxFVT 1689 —06 Del aw p 1957 —.14 


motylic n 1249 —.16 L/5G0V liw — 16 IrdlEqp 1356 +21 

mctiCaPf 208S +45 Cambridge Pds Deictic 770 + 82 

okS S,^ „ CapGrA 1575—14 USGovtP 678—11 

AZ TF 1086—85 GvInA 1179 —47 TreosP 9J0 — 45 

CO TF 1079—84 GwthA 1672 —80 TxUSp 1287 —M 

HITF 1185—45 MuIncA 1588—10 Txlrap 1159— 86 

KY TF 10.93 —84 CapGrtJt 1573 — 14 TxFrPap B77 — JM 

NrgnstTF UL33 —.07 GvlnSf llfll —47 pa ium lenrt Fete 
ORTF ia«S— 45 GwttlBI 1640 —81 US LTD 1445 —76 

rcti Funds McGrBI 1554—18 USSnU 881 — J» 

Bol 10.10 —11 MuIncBT 1699 —10 US 6-10 n 1184 —.11 

Em Grin 1183—25 capMkfdx nl 1 74 — 20 Japan n 2426+173 


DelSin 770 +82 WWH«tol044 -48 

US^ p LwIt? Sn'MO-J 7 

Trf«^ 1257 —S& 1182-20 


UrtHde 1020 —86 FTHwMu 1146 —06 
US Short 9.97 — 41 RrstlnweStai* 


AduiCap 2145 —26 Em Grin 1183 —75 CapMkldx nl 1 74 — JO Janonn 2426+173 

AdvCBrtP 1058 — .16 GovCoro 10.55 —10 CapItolEq nx987 — 19 UKn 2671 +88 

AdvCRri P 1083 — 09 Grolnc 13.02—17 CopDolFI nx 1IU4 —.16 Coni n 1450 +.18 

AdwestAdvanft MnTF 1185—05 CwMEGnlXftS— 13 DFARIEst n 1 183 - 

Govt np 1079 —78 USGav 1048—11 CappielUIl 989 —27 Rxdn 10273—71 

Gwth no 1751—17 Armstnan 883—18 CBM Group: GJBd 10556 —90 

HYBdP 945 -42 AltantaGrpll87 — .12 FundSW 17J6 — 79 Govfn 105.47—173 

inconp 1X13 -.13 Attos Funds Gvffnc 480 —02 hdGv 11436-1^ 

MuBdNat 1075 — 06 CoMunl 1149—87 MedRs 1972 —41 IrtIHBM 1153 +45 

Spdnp 71.12 -24 CAIns 1052 -85 NJapcn 7.13 +84 LCaPlnl 280 +75 

Aetna Funds GvtSec 1087—12 US Trend 1X69 —78 PacRIrn 1866 + 78 

Aetna n 1089 —09 Grolnc 1429 — 26 Ordinal FORtin uSLOVal 1080 -73 

Bond nx 1048 —12 NoMurx 1186 — .06 AgoGWl 1049 —31 U5SmVd 1167 — 87 

Grwinca 11.17—12 BOAT Funds Balanced 1076 —JM DodaeACaac 

IntlGrn 1169 +41 BalBn 1073 - Fund 13.oo —49 Batann 4742 —64 

Ataer Funds GroincTnxii84— 49 GovtObiio 888 — Q5 Income n 1157 —.13 

Growth 1 2179 —78 lrtGovTnxiai4— li OxBCa 1X34—01 Stack n 5411 +89 


Txlrap 1159 —86 DNEI ]162 
TxFrPap 677 — JM £** < r p — ■£ 

AmrioadRh I irSGJ 1086—07 

LBUU14C6-76 MITFp 1076 -84 
USS/rt 861 -J» _M» Tfl . W* -J* 

US 6- 10 n 1184 —.11 FF a Funds 

Japan n 2426+173 Co»« W78 +82 


GtobaJn 1782 *85 

Income n 1168 —11 

1084 — 88 BlChbp 1569 —41 SASLngnll63 — H 
11040—47 Gtobl p 686 +49 S8£PMn3723 -62 

e Govt a 1156—13 TaxEx 1240 —86; 

1162 —20 Gtatncp 668 — 88 Trust* n 3X92 —73 
1162 — 20 hfirtiYdp 549 +81 6E Funds 
■086 —87 Income p 474 + 41 GlobatC 1979 + 89 
1086—07 InvGrdp 1042 — 14 IncameC i>1712 — .J J 
1076 —84 LifcBCP 1443—28 ShagC 1403—21 
1076 —84 UleHYn 1144 +JM U5EqDn 1446 — 77 
USA np 1187—21 GE USE 1645 -77 
2078 * 82 MATFp 1241 — JM GTTImnt: 

1045 —43 MITFp 1280—11 EaSPCn 2161 + JJ3 
1489 + 86 NJTFp 1X52—8B HlYldn 1089 — 87 

2272—14 NYTxFrpl570 — 84 TxFiVAnllTB — 06 
2X76 —55 PA TF p 1X16—08 GT Global: 

1778— .19 SaecSd 1281 +83 Amerp 1740 

=m*bx Sosap 1843 -45 EmMkt 1875 +69 

9.90 _ TaxExPt P’357 — 45 EmMWB 1871 +69 


OhtoP 567 —03 
PreOVWp 957 * 40 
Proves P 683 —83 
Seiecd p 963 —.13 
Stock p 20.12 —75 
SirAaat 1575—47 
StrEqt 9.71 —08 


PTxFBf 11.92 —06 Mentstrn 1278—17 
SKGU 844 —81 MeraerFa plflJOT —83 
T*F8t 1064 —85 Meridlann 2574 —16 
GKJpCt 1945 +.15 MerrfliLVDdc 
TxFCt 1044 —05 AmerltUV 1078 —45 


GlobatC 1979 + 69 
JncameC n 1X12 —.1 1 
StragC 1683 —71 


UKn 2X71 +48 Newln c >045 —03 

Cooln 1450 +.18 Pamwi 14JI9 + J06 

DFARIEst n 1 143 . Perea 2272 —M 

Fixdn 10273—71 Frtnntn 2X76—55 

GJBd 10556 —20 Fascianon 1778 —19 

Govt n 105.47—173 FeduraM Fuads 
InIGv 114J6—149 ArmSSpn 9.90 


IrtIHBM 1153 +45 
LCceUnt 1260 +75 
PacRim 1866 + 78 
USLOVal 1040 —73 
USSmVal 1167 —87 


SlrSTI 182 
StrWGt 546 +.17 
TEBndP 419—83 
UtlIFnep 662 —13 
isi Funds 


957 * 40 FlxCt 1145— JB 

683 —83 FOACI 1164 +45 
963 —13 GvSCI 1049 —09 
0.12 —75 hndCr 949 —87 
575 —47 PTxFCI 1123 —87 
9.71 —00 Sica 844 
662 —86 KIARF 987 —81 
182 - ladder Droop: 

546 +.17 ARMGVA1285 
4.19 —83 A5IABB 1362 —74 
682 —13 EmlMktA 1X13 +88 
EmrtrtklB 1X12 +87 


BalGM 1601 — JM 
CeraGrihA 1480—21 
QxuGrthB 14.14 —70 
OoreG«1hQ1388— 20 
BnaGrA 1X90 —28 
ErnuGCB 1X88—79 
EmaGrYMlX12— 77 
IncGrA 1584 +82 
tocGrfl 1X19 +82 
WWGrB 15.12 +.18 
WWW 1X19 +.U 


BandFd 926 —08 MklNCt 1181 
Equity A 1666 — 68 MunNJt 1160 —08 
HEqA 1423— 87 MUNYt 1261 — M 
IntGovA 1X14—08 MunOhl 1268—08 
WOSA 1486 +66 MuPot 11.17—07 
LtdMalA 929 —86 NtMunt 164' 
MIMuA 1188 — 84 struct fp >171 
SmCpA 2262—92 StrixdBf 1171 
USGvIa 988— JU US CM fin 1041 
nriaiaaeCStas- . UBHJh . 981 
Baton Cn 1167 —23 PndudMMIt 
BcmdCn 925 — 88 AefSaf n W.i; 
Equity Cnl667 -68 Bdrr 1161 
GvhncC 988 — JM GthSikn 1241 


MuMnt 1248 — JB income n 1386— 13 
MunMM 1284—07 hifemaan46.11 +149 
MunlMod 11179—04 hdBdn 1362—18 
MuNCf 1189— JB LafAmr r 2488 +181 


MATxn 1477—09 
MadTFn 1149 — JM 
MU1& 9.11 —05 
NYTstn 1172— JB 


NtMunt .1644 — 12 OH Tit n 1X64 -JB 
Struct fp 7175 —08 PA Train 1484 —JS7 


Sftuctet 1175— 09 
US CM fin 1046 —13 
.UU&lt . 983 —11 


PacOppsnl&TO +72 
QuaiGrR 1587—19 
ST Band n 1128 —05 
STGUn 1161—06 


*SSB*B. a= » 

8ssaif=s 

StarWSlGv iJW—M 
sutnMu p 107» -JS 
Stole Bend Gnk 
Coma 723 —la 
OftersHU 946—13 
Prooross 1280 — 
TBx 6* 11.15 —02 
UStop- 572-04 
SfFpnnWB 
Bdonn 3148 —46 
Gwflin 2261 —43 
■ Interim 1065 — W 
Muffin WB-W 
Street RdlC 
CATFC 848 —05 
CopfMA txro —TO 
COPfE) 928 —TO 
COPitOfi 9.77 —JO 
ExxtiFd ritB781— 1W 
ErurovA 11^ +41 
GvtfhcA 1X73—10 
GvhflB ■ 1271 — -JO 
KTlCn 863 —17 
UtVTrB 874 —is 
invTrAP 877 —15 
InYTrC 879 —IS 
NYTFAP 86S-84 
NYTFC 866—04 
S t ea d m a n Funds 
Amtndn 16S +81 
Assoc n 87 —81 
InveJn 165 —03 
Ocbohr 259 


_ mu 

FdNcrrw La« Ok 

NwCfft ll^J— S 
Retfra 8.11 — M 
SCfTtBcf* ^ 

vanguard 763 —13 
iMMServtas 
AUAmn 21.13 —39 
Enron — 8J 
GtoRscn XO +88 
Gj/tsnn 260 +87 
cJSStin 191 -14 
Incan 1470 — .19 
RedEstn 1074 —15 
soTrCvtmwn — n 

U5TxFrracl277— 09 
WrtdGldnlB63 +43 


BondCn 925 —88 AcfBafn 11.17 —10 TxFHYfi 1X62 —05 

Equity Cnl667 -68 Bain 1160—12 Vduen 1X92—15 

GvhncC 988 — JM GfhSlfcn 1248—38 ZertDOOn 1X89 — 44 

HYEqCnl423 — 07 Income <n 1X13 —13 SeafinPMA: 
IntGvtCnltM — 88 hUISIkn 1X13+72 AssetAx 1484 — 72 

toff Cn 14.12+66 Sflddxn 1183—21 BlCh 1772—28 

LMMtC 929 —06 PataamFUuds Bonds 11.13—13 

MIMnC 1189—03 AmGovp 823—11 Security Mads 
MuSdC 1080—84 AdlAB 1068 —JB Bcndp 780—11 

SrilCapC 2271 — 93 AsiaAp 1446 +74 Equity 565 —08 


AdlRA p 973—01 Nomurant1BJ4 +20 PcmBaln 1726 —79 BtGvAp 421—03 
AZMA 11.12 —06 Narih Am Funds Parnassus 3283 —53 AZTE 953 —05 

BalA 1269 — 08 AstAffR 1178 —15 Pasadena Group: CATxAp 888 . TXBc . 1049 

BasVIA 2X76 —44 GiGrp 1453 +48 BaRtnA 2281—01 Cortv+ri p 19.92 - Ultra 748 

CAMA 1075 —07 Gwthp 1466—23 GrnrthA 1520 — 40 CpAT 4483 +81 Selected Funds 

CalMnA 1X14— W Grlncp 1268—17 NtovSU xtm — m DivGrp 921—10 AmShsnpl463 


Equity 565 —08 
EqdA 1089 +77 

Grlnc 764—13- 

TXBc 1049—06 

Ultra 748 — W 



CapFdA 2857 — 41 I USGvtp 1084 — 07 PakWortd nlX40 — 19 DvrinAp 13JM —02 1 3««np 1X13 — 16 


Muni ora 1183 —10 GtoEqBn 1661 +47 
NoAmp 1X19—18 GtoEflCnlAM +77 


USEqDn 1646 —77 I IndOneGT 1078—11 
GE USE 1635 — 77 lodependenca Cap: 
TTJnvst Oppart p 1143—75 

EqSpen 2161 +JD3 StotGvtp 9.98—83 

HlYldn 1089 —07 TRBdp 1060 —06 

TxFiVAnllTB —06 TR Grp 1X60—35 

T GtabaE InvResh 465 —JM 

Amerp 1740 -tovSerOpdid: 


GlbEqA 1621 +77 F+fdSecA P 9.97 —10 

GtaFxB 1X41 —.14 FLMA 1X7D —08 

GtoFxA 1X42 —14 FdFTA 1687 —17 

GvtAt 1482 —13 GIA1A 1360 + 83 


1153 +45 Arm In 9.90 _ TatRefP 1X08—17 

1X60 +75 ExdiFdn7XW — 75 Utfllncop 555 —.12 
1866 +78 FHdBn 1X69 —09 VATFp 1387 -87 
1080 —73 FST1 isn 9 JM — JM FirstMut 1X16—41 
1167— 87 FGROn 2387 —58 Rut Omaflu; 
s FHYTn 961 +85 Equity n 1X61 —18 

4742 —64 FTTOn 1065 — JM Fxdlncn 10.42 —12 

1127—12 FITSSP 1065 —06 SIFxInn 1088 -86 

56.11 +69 FsiatlSn 1050 —06 FPDvArtP 1110 —.17 


EmMkt 1X75 
EmMMB 1871 


TaiRefp 1X08 —171 Eurooep 1157 +.17 
utfllncop X5S — .121 Ei*oB 1151 +.17 


SIGovT nxlX12 —10 OmeaOHTmoi — 01 DamSodal 1262 —76 F^OrtSSpltLM —06 5*TEtotplX37 —83 


MUCPGM12J7 — 25 BEA Funds CnKBIA 1683 +47 D remuq Funds 

SmCdof 2271 —91 EMfcEI 2111 +53 CnKBlB 1681 +48 Cant™ 1U5 — 79 

ABancsOst InMEa 21.13 +47 CBnfumGp 9J0 — 08 H*fn 1X91—60 

Aflancep 624—15 SMF+in P 1760 + 82 CntrvShrn 2X84 — 55 SmCpVal nll47— 13 

Baton p 14.14 —73 BFMShOu n 984 — JM QlQvBC 1366—16 Dmtos 
Batons t 1575 —16 BJBGlAp 1X31 - ChesGrth 1X75—17 A Braid nxIXI? -76 

BancLA p 15J,:- —85 BJBJEaAp 1X97 +66 CHestnl 14X68-X66 Aprecnp 1X05 — 71 

Canada P 574 —IB BNY HondBrac ChicMIlw n 16X57 —77 AssetAD n 1281 —.17 

Cnstvlnv 1180 — M Eqlncnx 1167 —.15 ChubbGrln 17JJO — JJS Batocd 1X65—22 

CPB0BP 1582 —05 IrPGovt 1089 —14 Chubb TR 1X19—07 CrtTkn 1561—08 


CPBUCp 1X02 —85 NYTEn 1X40 — 04 Otoper n 5181 —74 1 Crtlrtn 1484 -JM 


Count p 1750 —64 Bataan Group: 

GtoSA p 1287 + 81 BondLn 1.67—02 


851 —10 
851 —10 
X50— .11 


Band Sn 1040 —80 
Erderp?n1720 —85 
Entrpn 1676 + 89 
Gwthn 1X20—14 
Irtl 1772 +64 


Grolnc p 262 —03 Gwthn 1X20 —14 
GwthFP 2560— IS Irtl 1772 +64 
GwthBt 2159 —.13 Skldown 1264 —16 
GrincBp 261 — 83 TaxFrSn 1186 — <M 
IrMAp 1064 — 87 TaxFrLn 940— JM 


Cotoalal Foods 
IntEatP 1986 +63 
CafTEA 782 — JM 
Con TEA 785 — JM 
FedSuc 1171 -.15 
FLTE A 789 — 83 
RiildA 845—09 


raman Funds FSTn 24® — 76 FtHtPriorite 

Cor*™ 1X95— 79 F5T1SSP 9JM — 04 Equ»yTrnja<a— M 
HiRtn 1X91—60 GnmalS n II 56 — 89 FxdtncTr 1062 —14 
SmCpVal nl 147— 13 GnmaSP 1156 — J» LtdMGv 9.96—87 
rey taB natSSp law— m First UiUon: 

A Braid nx 1X19 —76 1MTIS 1185 — 05 BrtTn 1X25—11 
Aprecnp 1X05 —71 MaxCap 11.96—71 BalCIn 1X25—11 

AssetAD n 1281 —17 MlnkarpnllT? —17 BalBp 1X25—11 
Batocd 1X65—72 ShrtTarn 1X35 — JI3 FxInBP 1061 — 87 
CrtTXn 1561 —08 US Govt n 1053 —18 FxtoTn 1061 — 87 
Call ran 1484 —JM SBFAn 1685 —15 InsTFCt 11.18 —87 


GvtocA 1033 —09 
GvtacB 1040 —.10 
GrincAp 658— 81 
GrincB 658 —81 
M»CrB 1968 —44 
mines 1569 -.06 
UlncA 1552 —85 
HBhCrp 1975 —44 
toflp 1170 +40 


StotGvtp 9.98— JB IrtFlA 1X36—11 
TRBdp 1040—86 KPEt 2445 —65 

TR Grp 1260—35 MonffldA 1177 — 08 

tvResh 465— JM SmCaPA 12J» — 32 

rvScrOpfifaE LMHn 1858—23 

CraiGri 1368—29 Landmark Fuads 
QualSik 1441—15 Baton n 1442—17 
USGvT 1084 — 85 EqmTyn 1486—14 
wesak tolfnc 988 —17 

Dvnmp 1258— .16 tofIBt >356 +78 

Emur1hpn1187— 14 NYTF nn 1156 —85 

Energy n 1079 +.13 USGvn 988—07 
Envhn n 768 —05 Loarei Funds 
Europe n 1365 +86 Batocd n 1X15 —IS 


Consultp 1X81 +79 NelnvGrn 2488—57 PavsonBI 1269 . EnRsAp M7D +.10 

CpHIA 868 +83 NelnvTrn 1085 +85 moral 1X11 —JB SalnAp 885 — JB 

ClnvGdA 1175 —17 Neneert Fuads PenCapA XTV +81 EuGrAp 1X38 +89 

CPlTA 11.90—15 ArflUST 10JC —03 PAMurU p 1177—06 FacRnp 1072 —09 

DevCaP 1786 +66 AdrGmrA 1087 — 83 Perfermanoe Fds FLTkA 953—05 

DrouA 1X14 +68 COTFA 1049—05 EqCon px 1186 — 16 G«9Ap 1X98—14 

EuraA 1562 +.13 GvtlncTr 972 —11 Ertnsnx 1186 — 16 WGvAp 1572 — 16 

F+dSecA P 9.97 —10 GvtlncA 971—11 toFICp 1053—15 GIGrAp 1X09+72 
FLMA 1070 —08 IncamefTrlOJO — ID InFlln 1053—15 GrtnAp 1377 —13 

FdFTA 1667— 17 InCOmeA HL31 — 18 STFi C pn 9.99 —06 «hAp 2788 —44 

G1AIA 1X60 +83 TFtocA 1077 —JM STFI In 979—06 KYdAp 1355 +86 

GIBdA to83 — 89 TFIncT 1X28 —85 Penn Fort Funds HYAdp 1073 +86 

GICvA 1078 +86 VaiuGrA X.1BJ05 — 77 FermPtn 1764 —02 IncmAp 775 —84 


EnRsAp I47D +.10 USGav pn 9.16 — 87 
EalnAp 885— JB S e i e mm ttr o up. 
EuGrAp 1X38 +89 FroaUraAlIJM — 34 


1X92 +40 ValuGrTxIXin— 26 THHn 


Fedto p 1X22 —09 CapFdA 1&J» —34 
R-TkA 953 —05 CDTXA 768 —05 
G«OAp 1X98—14 ‘ CTOSfcA 2354 — 31. 
GKTvAp 1572 —16 ComunA 1485 —37 
GIGrAp 1X09 +72 CommunD1372— 37 
GrtnAp 1377 —13 FLTxA 886 —JM 
HMlAp 2788 —44 GATkA 040 —06 
KYdAp 1355 +86 GtWEjrrBAll.16 _ 
HYAdp 1073 +86 GEmgQ 11.11 
IncmAp 775 —84 GrowttiA X31 — 08 


FtoSvcn 1665 —72 
Gekfn 685 +J» 
Growth np 560 —.11 
HflhScn 3686— 37 


tnfIB 1164 +79 HiYldnp 752 +81 
Japan p 1X19 +71 > Indnca nplXl7 — 06 
LatAmG 2684+180 lldGovn 1267 —10 
LatAmGB2i89 + 1791 IrrtGrn 1789 + 67 


Padfp 16. IB +74 

PacifB 1609 *73 

SlratAp 1X58 —11 

Strata 1X57 —.12 

TeieB 1771 +.17 


Leisure n 2259 —09 
PacBasn 1646 -88 


toTmto nx 1087 —12 
S1P50Q 1043 —19 
Stock n 1065 —27 
Lozaid Group: 

EouBy 1475 
IntlEq 1X47 
I ntlSC 1249 
SmCOp 1558 
SpEa 1X73 _ 

StraYd 1070 


GiRsA TX15 +71 
GIUtA 1363 —10 
GrtRA 1856 —03 
HeaffilA 485 — JB 
tostlnp 1X17— TO 
IrttEqA 1281 +43 
MIMuA 1057 —OB 
MNMuA 1086—07 
LatAmArlB65 +78 
MninsA 862 —05 
MurXJdA 1X00 — 82 
MuInTrA 1066 —85 
MNaHA 1085 —06 
NJMA 1161 —89 
NYMnA 1X12—09 


VBWtdn 5465 —15 I MllnAp 971 —07 1 


1183 — 82 PeritCGn 1250—27 
1185—02 PhSaFund 680—16 
1X70 — JB Rtocnta Series 


MdTMl 972 —04 
MITXU p 968 —04 


tocomeA 1466—12 
toCUmcD 1462 —12 
IrttA 1789 +37 
LATXA X 70 —05 


Advtgn 1X20 
AmUflln 1083 —24 
Cm5Jlcn 18JT— 07 
□fsanrn 1845—10 
GratScn - 1063— 09 
KY1MU 1X18— JU 
moan -1048 — M 
tosMun 1167 — JM 
tnUn . 1572 +52 

invrtn 1975—12 
Muffldn 1X27—03 
OPrtntya2888 +81 
STBraidniOTfl - 
STMunrr 1048 —82 
Total n 2583 —10 
SunEogGvt .. - 


MuniAp 960 —03 I MaatTkA 840—05 


tosMun 11.16— Jfl BatonFd 1X99 — .16 f MnTjum 944—831 MDTxA 863 —85 


MDVal 1059 — 82 
MA IMS 1076 —02 
MAVOI 1043— JB 
Ml Vaf 1083 — JB 

MulBC 964 — 81 
NJVai 1066—83 
NYlns 1X95—03 
NYVOi 1088 —02 
OH Veil 1X93—82 
PAVbl 1X77—04 
VA Vaf 1071 —JO 


GofTScEp 1376 — JM NJTXAp 965 —05 
CopArp 1987—14 NwOpAp 2487 — 59 


CvFdSer 1X40 —03 
EatvOpp 773— ml 


NwOpAp 2487 — 59 MtoffTJcA X19 — 05 
NYTXAp 966—05 MOTxA «J6 —05 


NYORAp 984 


Growth 2142—16 OTCEp 1160—27 
mYieWx 947 —04 ChTtolp 946—03 


InGrAp 1082 ' 
InGrfiT 1081 


NalfT)cA B.15 —07 
NJTxA . X12 — JU 
NYTlcA 851 —06 

NCRxA X14 —05 


TxExAp 951 —05 ONoTXA 058—85 


1170— 87 OVB Funds 


CanApoA 1079 —18 1 TEBdx 1174—87 


CT Inin 1X80 —86 FtoeHy Advhar: 
Dreyfus 1344—14 EqPGR 2942 
EdStod 1X99— 63 EqPfnc (562—13 
FLlmn 1190 —86 ErCra>Apnll51 . | 


InsTFCt 11.18 —87 Telecom 1778 +.17 
InsTFBp 11.18 —87 WMwp 1X42 +61 


Salman np& ij — SSJ LebenNY 015 — 85 
TxFree nplx56 —07 LeabParn 1XB7 — 87 
Tech n 2X44 —60 Lena Mason 
TatRto 1866—20 Ameri-dplXlO— 14 


GNMA npxlXI3— 16 1 GUResc 1773 -85 


Swdown 1264 — 16 GrwthA p 1483 — 33 
TaxFfSn 1186 — 04 HiYIdA 789 +83 


FLTE A 789—83 GnCA 1473 — JB Gov top 983 —11 

FundA 845 —89 GMBdp 1X84—88 GrwOPPP2X92 — 47 

GrwthA p 1483 —43 GNYp 21.17—11 HIMUP 1273 —86 | 

HiYIdA 789 +83 Grincn T7J9 — 10 FBYWpn 1X12 +85 

lncameAp674 —05 GwthOon1X74 — .18 IncGtp 1178 
fnfGrA 1X96 +79 lrtsMunnpl9.15— .12 LM TER plfi.59 — JB 
MATxA XW— 03 totermn 1465—06 LtdTBR 1189—11 
Ml TEA 740— 04 IrrterEaP 1X12 +48 LKTTEI 1X59-85 
MN TEA 765—02 tovGNn 7X37—10 OwtaP 1197 +44 
NalResA 1X06 +.15 MAIntn 1X79 —05 ST R P 1X09—83 
NY TEA 767 —03 MA Tax n 17.18 —09 StrolOp P 2059 — 77 
OhTEA 763—04 MunBdn 1X39 — 06 Ftoellly kwBut 
SmSHtP 17JG— 10 NJIrtn 1X99 —06 EaPGIn 2951 — 62 
SlrtlncA 766 — 83 NJMunn 1406—08 EaPtln 1572—13 
TxExAp 14.12 —07 NwLdr 3426—52 IShlGv 987 — JJ7 
TxIraAp 854—04 NYTTxnp 1287 —07 UBIn 11.10—11 
USGrA 1289 -70 NYTaxn 1X16 — 10 BdeBy Invest: 

USGvA 675 —85 NYTEp 1875 —07 A0iTFnwl279— .11 
UfflAp 1X09 —40 Peaplndt 1X07 — 29 AMgrn 1X72—06 
CATEBt 762 —04 PeaMidml7.19 — 28 AMarGrnUOl — 05 
CTTEBt 785 — JM SMnGvn 1141 — JB AMprlniull.13— JOB 
FedScBt 1121 —IS ST Inc pn 1241 —07 Brtanc 1X62-82 
FLTxBf 789— 83 ShlnTp 1X31—03 BiueCh 2469 —31 


IraMuB 1064 —87 UMBBn 1160—11 
InsMCp 1064 —07 UMBHrtn9J9— 04 
toflAp 1X46 + 57 UMBStn 1663 — 18 
MrfUAP 977—14 Value n 2588—44 
MrtoBp 973 —14 BaBanffiieiiiUCaiser: 
MrtaCp 973 —14 Divorsan 1X40 
MlflTrAp 9.90 — 03 Inti Ear] 643 +.15 
MtgTB P 9.90 — JD totJFIn 1046—13 
MlflTrCP 9.90 —03 Baird Raids 
MIHG 1076 —07 JVdllnc 983 
188 - BICMP 


LtdTBR 1189—11 
LKTTEI 1X59 — JB 


MMSAp 093-81 CapDevp 2375 — 63 
MMSB1 093 —81 BakrGvn 
MCAAP 1X86 — J3S Bankers Trusk 
MuCA B P1084 —.05 InstAMat 1X00 —16 


NU1CACPIO86 — J05 
MuFLCP 107/ —09 
ICATA 1387 —09 
MullCAB 1387 —08 


InsfEqn 1078— .19 
InvlmTF 1X60— JM 
InvIntEq 14.14 +.17 
tovUflln 1053 —70 


IncameAp674 —OS 
fnfGrA 1X96 +79 
MATxA X10 —03 
Ml TEA 740— JM 


NY TEA 767 —03 
OhTEA 763 —04 
SmSikP 1783—10 
SlrtlncA 766 —83 
TxExAp 14.12—07 


HTYtdpn 1X12 +85 FrtiFdFn 1002 —12 
IncGtp 1178 - Floo tavashr*: 

Ltd TER plii.59 —85 EmGttlP 1229 —07 


MnBtfTn 1065 —.11 WldwB 1X33 +61 
NOMunCf 1X67 — 07 GaMB Funds 
USGvtBp 1082 — ABC D 1086 
USGvfCr 1X02 -89 Assatnp 2151 -73 
VdueBp 1780 —13 CanvScp 1167 -02 
VatueCtol779 — .13 Ealncp 1182—08 
ValueTn 1780 — .13 GITelP 1049 +JH 


hrtnpx 1055 —14 Oidaxy Funds 
IrrtTrp 1471 +79 AssetAD n 11.12 —15 


Wtdwp 1X42 +61 USGovf no 779 —10 GWGovt p 1X24 — 07 
WldwB 1X33 +61 UfBnx 1X51 —21 GvHndiv1061 —03 
laWB Funds ValEq 1760 — 77 tovGrnp 1063— 10 

ABC D 1086 _ InvPflnp 1089—06 MrfTFp 1660 —09 

Asset np 2151—73 JnvPfNY 1355 — 87 PATF p 1681 -JH 

CanvScp 1167 -JB lnvTrGvtBt 9.93 — .13 Splnvnp 2296—43 
Ealncp 1182 —08 isfelFdnp 1580 —.17 TxRirt p 1S62 —05 

GITelP 1049 +82 JP Growth 1789 -75 TatRet 1*1451 —II 

GrawttinpZLIS— 47 JP Income 9.93—13 VarTr no 1952 —42 
SmCapG 1763 —29 JPMtoJflt; LradngtonGrp: 

Value p 1187-75 Bondn 9.98—10 CnvSecn 1477 — 09 
iciaxy Funds DiversHdnlOTS— J» CL* 1287—28 


SPV1A 1583—13 EmGrthAiOJ]5 —48 TalRet p 1565 — 85 

StrDvA 1285—24 GovfSecA n984 — 13 USGvBx 969—12 

STGIAn 862—02 OokHofin 1474 +85 WMOpp 1184 +.16 

TechA 481 —11 Odanrk 24.11 +JM HerpoatFds 
TX MA 11.19—07 oakmnlt 1688 +84 Bondn 1063—10 

WTtflncA 947 — 83 ObenweiS 2187—56 TEBondn 11.92 —05 

AtfiRB 973 —02 OcoaflTEp 10.97 —02 EmaMEqn1267 • _ 

AmerinB 11078 —05 CfWlrtl 1167 +49 Equity n 1966 -21 

AZMBt 11.13—86 OidDamto 2X06 —26 CapA«in2X05 —25 

BalBt 1159 —08 OtvEotaC 1664 —01 IrtfEnn 1147 +.48 


Ml 1378 +79 TFlnAp 1071 — JOB ORTXA 
MuffRAp 1347 —08 TFHYA 1573 —05 PATVA 
MufFfflpUTS— OS TFHYBT 1573— M CAHyr> 
StockFd 1364 —79 TFln&t 1572 —08 CAOTXJ 
TEBdx 1174—07 Texacp 964—04 SCTXA- 


TalRetp 1565— OS. USGva p 1362 — JB 


CAHYTXA AM 
CAOritA 7JD9— 06 
SCTXA- - 849—85 


976—20 KYBdAp 781 - 

783—13 ScaflnelGraape 
1280 —26 AssGrthp867— 05 
1066 — 82 BrtancsdPUTl— 18 
1442 + 73 BandP 658 —08 




•1 



481 -83 CdmStkp2979 —51 


CATxflf 887 —01 
DvrtoBT 1380—04 
GeaBt 1X92—14 


GvSecsp 1043— 12 
Growth p 1745 —34 
PATFp- 1373—05 


BaSVIBt 2385—44 lotvBaBn 1655— 15 RffiaxEG 1242—25 FLTXBt 982 —05 TFtncp 1X96 —07 


ONMnBt 12.14 —09 OneGraap: 

CAMB 1025 —07 AntAOmlOl — 13' 


P 1X51—45 TxIraAp 884 — JM 


USGrA 1289 —70 
USGvA 675 —05 
UfflAp 1X09 —60 
CATEBt 762 —04 
CTTEBt 785 —04 
FedScBt 1171 —15 
FLTxBI 789—03 


MINSp 1088 —04 BaronAstn 2146 —07 
MuOHCpIXSO —06 Barden Fuads 
MuNJCp 1077 —07 BasCVIn 1589 -.14 


PundBf 844 —09 ThdOrtrn 040 —10 
GEqB 1X98 +80 UST Int 1382—17 


AMarn 1S72 — 06 
AMarGr nl461 —05 
AMprln nxl 1 .13 — 08 
Batonc 1362-82 
BiueCh 2669 —31 

a Iran 1187 -JB, 
TFn 1262—08 


MNYA 1X12— 05 1 
MuNYBP 10.12 —05 
MuNYCp 1X13 — JM 
NMuAP 1087—07 
-NKMuCp 1088 —06 1 
NEUrAP 1X95 +JM 
NAGvA 1042 —06 


Fbradln 1029 —08 
VI llfll 1X12 +73 
BoscomBal2250 —74 
BayFundstralfe 
ST Yield 9.91 —04 
Bondn 1X12— .11 
Equity 1X90 -15 


GwthBt 1X98 —43 USTLno 1561 —31 Conada n 1864 -.15 
HYMuBI 1046—04 USTShn 1164—11 CapAppel774 -65 
HYSecBT 789 + 83 Drevtw CDtmlocfc Codnco rrla.ll +83 


1197 +44 MMutr 0X7183 — >0 EqGnh 1X99—73 
1X09 —83 OurtGrp 1272 —20 EqtVal 13J» —17 
2X59 —27 TeflncSh 18041 —34 Ealncmn1X62 — 16 
Bull TaMTuyfOOTI —14 HU Bd 1085—15 

2951— 62 Value p 1168—14 toTBd 1054 — 11 
1572—13 FtaasMpGnuk IntEqtn 1343 +79 

987— 87 AATEap 1146— 07 NYMun 11.11 —06 
11.10—11 AATECp 1145 —07 STBdn 1X15—86 
tst AZTE p 1172 -87 SmCo& ni264 — 71 

11X29 —.1 1 CTTEA p 1X92 — J77 TE Band hi 186 —05 
1072 —06 COTEp 1077—06 Gatowoy Fipidc 
1661 —05 R-TEP 11.19—06 GOtoBdn 1X37 -85 
tll.13—08 GATEp 1X95 —07 IndxHn 1094—16 
1362 — 82 GUKbP 1888—23 SWRWG 1472—16 
2669 —31 totTEp 1075 —05 GnSecn 1X38—09 
1187 -JB KYTEAP1161 — 87 GlnWGreap: 

1262— JB KSTEP 1076—07 Erisanp 2961 -48 
1864—15 LATEp 1175 —87 GlndFdn 1557 —.19 
1774 -65 LttfTEp 1087 —JQ GUnmede Funds 


EmuMk&UUa -47 GNMA nx 841 —09 
toflEaty 1)1068 +46 GJotmln 1443 +48 


EqtVal 1383—17 ST Band n 9.95 —85 GckUdn 681 +.16 
Eqlnonnl262 — .16 SmaflConlXBO — 12 Gfnlncn 1665—13 
KUOBd 1085—15 SdEqtyn 1187 — 12 SlGavtn 987 —JM 
totBd 1054 —11 JacJaaa Neawafc Sfflil 478 +89 

IntEqtn 1343 +49 Growth 11.12 —70 Stov 251 +.12 

NYMun 11.11 —06 Income x 1X50— 19 TE Bd nx 1088 — 10 
STBdn 1X15—86 TaxExx 1X84 —OB WW&n 1461 +47 
SmCoEaniXM— 21 ToIRtn 1X86—10 Liberty Franiy; 

sswk-" j B£2Vn_* 


[LtodMtonGne anvGdB 1185 —17 

‘ cS5SS?n 1427 -09 CPT"» 

n+ 1287—28 DrDBBp 18JI9 +68 

SNAKU^ gagM l»g 
Gtaboln 1443 +48 r 

GckUdn 681 +.16 f X6 8 B I 1X38—00 
Gfnlncn 1665—13 -'i® 

SlGavtn 987— JM RM7 >023 —23 
StSI 428 +89 GIAIBt 1367 +83 


OtoFdat M.18 —30 BtuCEqA XT346 — vl9 ARSIV 746—01 
Qr+UBt 068 +83 DscVatA xlXJB — 07 AUSkA 788—02 
anvGdB 1185 —17 EntodxAxlX27— 23 ArfflJSJV 773 —02 

CpITBI 1180—15 GvArmA n 985 —09 ARSI 7.15—81 

DrooBp 1889 +68 GvBUA p 1X00 — 07 ARS1-A 7.18 - 

EuraBt 1587 +.12 IndEqA x 1322 —18 ARSII 748 —01 

FedSecB r 987 —10 InaxneBd X981 — 14 AdRJS 785—01 
FLMBt 1(08 —OB IntFxlx 1041—13 JVfiliSIl 7.16 —81 
FdFTBl 1587— 18 torTF Ax 1171 — 09 AUSHI 7.15—02 
FdGrfit 1073—23 IrfflEqA nxlX65 +41 CPUfipx 763—25 
GIAIBt 1367 +83 LoCoGr 1156 —11 GNMAx 1352 —18 


PHgrtmGrp: GKSBT 986 +72 Wtorid p • 1X15 +.TI 

AJ2S III 774—01 GrtnBt TX68 — 13 Sertrvn n 14JQ — 13 

ARSIV 746—01 HHhBt 2682—44 Sequoian 5489—79 

AUS l~A 788—02 vflYMBt 1352 +86 Sovea sera Series 

ArflUSlv 773 —02 InawneB t 773 — JM Matrix n 1188—17 

ARSI 7.15—81 InvBt 021—14 S&FMIdn1182 — IV 

ARSI- A 7.18 _ MunBI 949 —84 SPSOOn 1074—19 


GavlBdn 1047-85 Entenran 2165 — IS 
IndxHn 1094 —16 1 FedTx£xn743 — 04 


AmLdr 1044 —15 
CapGrApll67 — 29 


GffidBt 1083—10 LsCbVrtxIlTS — j 09 
GKvBt 1183 +85 LfVolAx 1X73 —10 
GBteai 1011+71 OHMUAXI1J1 —89 
GflJIBt 1158—10 SmCDGr 1776 —25 


InoomeB 624 -85 CrarVrtA 1145 +.13 
IntGrB 1X95 +79 CapVolBtlUl +.12 
MATxBt 010—03 PStuAp 9JO +.11 
NatftesBtilM +.14 PtsnnOt 944 +.17 
NYTxBf 767—03 Dreyta Premier 
OHTxBt 763—04 CAMunA 1X56 — ■ 00 
StmnBt 766—03 CTMuA 1257—07 
TxExBt 1012—07 COPGOt 1660—04 


« d p B,1 JS 


NAGvSp W42 —06 BayFUnds taraf: 
NAGvC 1041 —06 STYIeldn 981 —84 
RrGrttiA plX09 —60 Bondn 1X12—12 
PrGfthBp>282 —39 Equity n 1080—15 
QusrAp 2X80 — 40 BeacHDI 3045—53 
ST Mia P 971—01 BSEmaObtllJM +80 
STMIbt 921 —41 Bencbmarfc Funds 
Techp 2653 —67 Balanced 1X33 —15 


MITEAP1XI2 — 06 


+.13 CbnarSt r84»84-145 MOTEp 1179 -87 
+.12 Contra e 3fl.11 —64 NCTEA p 1041 —86 
+.11 CnvSecn 1660 —08 NMTEP 1X43—46 


WJfflfKP 
AmSauth Fi 


TEtosBt 854 — JM 
USGrBt 1X02—20 
USGvBt 625 —05 
UlflBt 1309—60 
Colombia Funds 
BakaicenlXll —17 


l 944 +.T7 Dwftovf 17-64— 25 NYTEP IT.IV— JB7 
rentier: DesKnyll 2X19 -61 ohteap1183 — 87 

A 1X56 —08 ObEq 1061—31 PATEp 1X69—05 
1X67 —07 Dhrerlntimzjj +71 TnTEAp 1154 —08 , 
1660 —04 DIuGlhn 1276 -85 UfilAp 1056—19 
11X66 . EmuGror 17.12 —32 VATEAPllJM —06 1 

61S65-8B EmrMkt 1955 +72 FtaxFUnds 
nl659 +29 Eoutlnc 3451 —23 Bandnp 2X10 
1 1669 + 79 EQIIn 1X93—14 Gfclnpn 943 —85 
1442 —11 Ealdx 1763—41 Growth np 1351 —15 


SESS7.SS =3 


Equity n 1X11—10 
inUGovn 1064—14 
Inin 1X74 +.10 
Muntotn 1X61 —87 
SmCoP n 1 479 . - 


NYTEP If. If —07 SmCflpn 1479 
OHTEA Pl 183 —87 OtreeMA 1X11 — 
PATEp 1059 —05 Goldman Soda Fml 
TnTEAp 1154 —08 COPGr 1567 — 


CTMuBt 1X66 
FLMunA 1565 —88 
G8t(nvAn1659 +79 
GUnvBt 1669 +79 
GnmaA 1442 —11 
GnmaBI 1443 —11 


AmLdr T034 —15 GrIRBt 1765 —04 TFBdA 1X09 —03 
CnpGrA p 1357 —79 HealthBl 372 — 07 lllCoreo 1079—14 
EalncAp 1142 —81 InflEqBl 1187 +33 IHOorNC 10«— 05 
EatocCt 1142 - GHeffi 1359 +79 Oppe nh elmur Rfc 

PTiefn 1976 +74 LatAmB 1 1862 +77 AnwtAp 1379—11 
FTTrft 1157—09 MAMBt 1179 -46 CATEAP1180 —01 
FSIncBd 1170 +87 MIMuBt 1X57 —00 ChpHYP 1344 +85 
MnSC 1148 —07 MNMB1 1086 —07 DfflCFOp 3870—181 


ARSII 770—01 - NJTXBt 964 —86 STGvtn .980 —04 
AdiUS 785—01 NwOppBmfll —59 YkJPIn 1081 +81 
ArSUSIl -7.16—81 NYTxBf 964—01 17WHMdS 
AUSHI 7.15—02 OTCBt 1143 —27 GavNtod 946—11 
CPUfipx 763 —25 TXEXBt 951 —85 Grained 1187 +81 
GNMAx 1352—10 USGvBt 1348—09 MATBn nl061 — 05 
HYMrx 658—01 UlflBt 971—21 TBdMed 111078—04 
MaaCts* 1X39 —09 VtstaBt 750 —12 ShPwmfi Funds . 
STMMJIx 763—06 Voyfif 1140—27 RafltKfrrn1X31 '' 

SrirfTrpx 644 —85 amMWfwi Gratae GrBfiTr 1X59 

Ffflar Ha rt s BoriForGrlDAfi +49 GrincETTMUB — 06 





4 








ShrtTrpx 644 -85 OnrtWIlie Gratae 
P Bnr Ha rt s BoriForGrlDAfi +49 


Flxlnc n 9.80-JM fTe ri n 1976 +74 
Fundn 1973—09 11^—09 

GrtWnc 1697—40 WlriCBd 1170 +37 
irttGvf 009—07 'l-S 

Mercury 1269 * 82 USGtoCpxaao- 
SiTmBdn 381 -81 USGvSecAJUO 
Twenn 2476—54 IKH 1266- 
Vetfirn 4940—71 .if"5<lCt 1265- 
WrkJW 2652 +65 Ltoerty Ftoancnt 
japanFdn 1163 + 60 Gttlinc 1047- 
JOhn Hancock: InMum 71.14 - 

CATEf 1X18— JB TFBond 1(190 - 
DisevBt 961 —23 USGov 978 - 
Growth P 1687 -47 UM 1162- 


lllCortlC 10 
OpfWnhulmar Ftt EqGrAn 1(70—16 
AwdAp 1379— 11 EqtoA 1173—19 
CATE A Oil JXJ —01 FXcBnA 1X45—1* 
ChpHYP 1344 +85 WmGvAn1X67— 14 
DtecFdp 3X70—181 NJMUAn 1049 —85 
EqtocA p 1070—00 STlnvA n 1X01 —01 
EqtocB 1X16—09 Pioneer Rmt 


1079—14 BrtGrAn 1049 — 16 BodGrwririM61 — 22 MGym-nlXU— 10 
1X82 —05 EaAoAn 1254 +85 BoeNumOIXSO— 25 LTtodTV n 982 —06 


USGvtCpxflTO — .09 MnlraBt 061 —06 
USGvSecASTD —10 MnLtdBt 1080 -82 


UfflHJ 1266 —24 MUMB 1066 —05 GWop 2157—18* 
UlllHICt 1*65 — 24 MNntmt 108S— 06 G»TP 1680 +.18 

abertyFtaanbafc NJMB1 1161 — 89 GlabEnvpllTS — 20 
Glhtoc 1X87—10 IWWI 12J2— 09 G(obe4Ap3985 +78 
InsMvni tl.M —MS JVCMBt MUM —89 JStabiB 30JU+J7 


EqGrAn 1140—14 BasNumOI062 — 25 SWCpeT ttJ»— W 
EqtoA 1173 — 19 QwrtFerVrtta: _ StorraTtata - . - .. 


FXcBnA 1065—15 
lntmGvAnl047— 14 
NJMUAn 1049 —05 
STtovAn 1X01 —01 


Europe 2X28 +.14 Muirfdipn055 +87 Galdinrai Sachs tort: 


GMncx 1003 —10 IIAcarc 1X14 —16 
Grlnc 1558—14 LTGvAp 877 —07 
IntlEq 1X26 +45 MATEI 1248 —07 
Munltoc 1465 —07 MflTEB 1X05—07 
SdEq 1566 —17 NYTElP 1257 -88 
SmoCcp 2059 —04 STStratB 881 —81 


. I BonOA/i 2X02—7*1 CamSfkn 1053 —17 1 A6AAUmAlX42 — 05 ExehFdrMTf— 1JB FrartaSnen )X*3 


Balance 1X10 —.15 
Band 11.18 —11 
Equity 1085 —21 
Gvtln 947 —04 
LMMat 106* —86 
ReuEq 1744 —15 
Amanatoc 1379 —18 
Ambatsrtor FM: 
BrtroF 1045—17 
Band nx 1X04-17 
CarrGrFnl7.09 —29 
Growth n 1X80 —41 
kbcStkn ixn —72 
IrnBond nxlXOO — 1 5 
IrrttStkn 1444 +40' 
5mGoGr nl40e —19 
Amtxascdor tov. 
Bondn 1004 
COreGrn I7J» -40 
Grwthn 1X79 —32 
IntBanc nxiOOO— .15 


DivGrAn 1X77 — 24 Fbffldn 1363—14 
EaWxAn 1X90 —20 Govt 843—04 
FocGrA 1070 —25 Grttin 2675 —41 
SMOur 1X03 —81 InflStK n 1358 +46 
SI BdA n HIM —.11 MurUn 1X77 
SmCoiA 1142—17 Spedn 2X19+83 
USGva 2X02 —13 Qanmaa Sens 
USTTdxA n2(L63 — 74 Govt 11.10 —.12 
Senham Group: Grolnc 1X10—3* 

ArSGavn 943 —02 Growth 1566 -7B 
CUTFln 1162 — 85 MunB 1409 —06 


Bonham Group: Grolnc 1X10 —M 

ArfiGovn 943 —02 Growth 1566 -7B 
CUTFln 1162 —85 MunB 1489—06 
CaTFTnn 1066 —07 Ca m p OW CnPhut 
CaTFSn 1046 -82 Eatytoco 1241 —14 
CaTTFH n 962 —06 FXdln 1X83 —12 
GafTFL n 1170 —.(M Growth H43 —21 
EqGron 1X08 —25 InHEq 1X13 +47 
EurBdn 1X78 —.09 IrtlFl 1049-03 
GNMAn 1076—84 MunBd 11.11—05 
GohBnn 1368 +75 NJMun 11 J9 — 84 
IncGran 15JI2 — 30 Shrflrt 1X56—85 
LT reran 1072 —22 CDmpailhiGrHPE 
NTTFln 11.16—84 BdStkp 1X16—10 


1363 —14 ME Mu nA 1X33 —88 FkMR 
843—0* AMMunA 1X31 —04 Fifty 
2675-41 MNMW1A1579 —08 GNMn 
1358 +48 MDMuBt1343 - GtaBdc 
1X77 - MuBdBT 1006 —87 GtoB0 

2X19 +83 Muni BdA 1005 —08 GvtSec 
me NCMuA 1X97 —10 GroCo 

11.10—12 NCMUB11356— 10 Grolnc 
1X10—36 NY MunA 1014 — JB HIYW 
1046 — 70 NY MuBt 1014 —89 InsMur 
1409 —06 OHMuA 1351 —06 IrtBdn 
Brtufc OMMuBf 1351 _ InfertSv 

1241—14 PA MunA 17.10 — .10 toffGrl 1 
1083 —12 PAMuBt 17.18 —09 InvGBl 
1173—21 TXMuA 2150—13 Japan 1 
1X13 +77 VAMuA 1753 —12 LrttoAl 
1049—03 VAMUBI 1753 . LtdMu 


46 Fontatoen 1X63 — 16 AtSGv 9.95 —02 Spc^p 1051 —62 

FkMFdn 1973 —17 FertbPUrtS GovAa 9.96-82 SpOosA X53 — 15 

Fifty 1079—12 AstAflp 1440—34 SvfTF 1X21—82 SpcOpsS 02—14 

GNMn 1X87 —08 CcnApp 3470 — 75 ST Gov 1X03 —86 Srlncfp 778 —02 

GtaBde 1255— .14 Crartlp 1764 —60 Gantt Ponds TaxEx fp 1174 -87 

GtoBaln 1367 +83 Hducrp 2094—66 EmoMk 1945 +53 JHaPCOCkFrowtoc 

GvtSec n 1X34 —13 GeiGrih P 1004 +86 GtGvto 1X10—06 AvTech 1165—3 

GroCo 2974 —64 GovTRp 090—10 lntl& 1X96 +44 EnvmAp 942 * 81 

Grolnc 2X69—19 Gnwthp 2023 —80 SmCOS 1667 —15 GflnBt 943 —88 


OHMB3- 1176 —00 
PocBf 2167 +85 
PAMBI 1170—07 
PhnxBt 1X59—01 
ST GIB t 862 -82 
SpVBt 1056 —14 
arDvBt 1X84—24 
TecWBt 473 —11 
TXMBt 11.19—87 
UhtnBtx 948-40 
WltflndBf 946 —03 


MunBd 11.11 —05 DreyfraSTratBulc 
NJMun 1149 — JM Growth P 3981 +43 
Shrtlnt 1X56—45 tocoma p 1474 — 16 
Um prafle Group: tm/A 2X15 —.10 

BdStkp 1X16—10 tovBl 2158—10 


CATEf 1X18—88 TFBond 1050 —84 OHMB1 1176 —00 

DisevBt 941 —23 USGov 978—03 PocBt 2167+45 

Growth P 1657 -47 UIB 1162—22 PAMBI 1170—07 

IIAcne 1X14— .16 LrtdTfmp 1X13—04 PhnxBt 1X69 —81 

LTGvAp 877 —07 Ltartwr Foods STOB1 862 —02 

MATEI 12JB— 07 Divn 2748—82 SpVIBt 1556—14 
MflTEB 1285 —07 Fund n 2X85 —81 SirDvBt 1244 —74 
NY TE IP 1X57 —88 Uffln 11.14 _ TochBt 473 —11 

STSfrotB 851 —81 Loomis Soytos TXMBt 11.19 —87 

SpdEAp 1549 —41 Bondn 1176—81 UtltoBtx 948 —40 
SpcBp 1051 —42 Growth on 1389 —39 WlOncBt 946 —03 
SpOpsA 053 —15 to«Eqn 1358 +JM Monbn rai FdS 
SpcOpsS 042 —.14 SmCrarn 1X17—44 AstAOnf 1145 +.12 

Shine fp 778 —02 Lordjttbrtfc gOi 1173 +86 

TaxEx fp 1L24 — 87 AffWdP 1X78—11 CrarAppf 1147 +JI9 

Hancock Frowtoc BandDebp955 +82 HwBd to 1X34 

AvTech 1145 —23 DewedhplXM— 77 MeUJOeSMlSt. 
EnvmAp 942 +81 Eu V -l 0 1471 —18 CatlA n A 1046—12 
GflnBt 943 —88 FdVrtup 1254 — 23 CopAlfi 1X42—12 
GlabAp 1X96 -J4 GIEaP 1259 +77 COpApC 1X50—12 
GUBt 1X80 +73 Gflncp 857 —09 ErtncA 1176—85 
GilnA 953 -88 GOVtSecp 255 — 04 EqlncC 1176 — 04 
GfabRx 1098 —.19 NofTFTr 004 » EainvxfA 1X43 —21 

GfTech 1039 —47 TaxFrp 1145 —07 EqfnvC 1X44—70 


GvtSccA P1059 - Income p 10 

HTYMB 1674 +86 Eurapep 19 
MYWA 1479 +86 PiO«Fdp23 
InsTEAp 1757 —10 PtoMadpW 
intrTEp 1578—06 InttGr 24 
tovGrA p 1188 —14 Ptonr II p 19 
MStoOGrA2X30— 25 PtoThreepB 
MlfltoCA 1483— 89 STInc 3 
NYTencA p!344 — JJ7 ToxRhpII 
NYTxBn 1344 — JB USGvp 10 
Oppen 11.19 —11 Hper Jaffenr- 
PATEAP1250 — 85 BatWKP 12 


FWHnA 1065— 1* CATE 1141—87 
WmGvAn1X47— 14 Fund 1XW —13 
NJMUAn 1049 —85 «Eq 1473 +.10 
STtovAn 1081 —01 GrlncA 1X14 —M 
laaeerHnfc InvQto 1171 —12 

Ealncp 1036—22 NattTE 1149—87 
Americp 1179 —11 NYTE 1157—0* 
Bandp 941—10 OPPort 1053—31 
COpGrp 1541 —10 SmCcp 1641 —22 

RTO^fp-TOT— TT- 

tncamep 1041 —10 RCMRart 2172 +44 


Ealncp 103*— 22 
Americp 1179 —11 
Bandp 941 —10 
CapGrp 1341 —10 


SpadAp 2012—52 
CopAppl 11637 +89 StrlncAp 578 . 

FlexSdto 1044 . StrfncBt 579 

WLde ShriuSt: SIuSTlAp 444 — 01 

COPAPA 1066-12 ShnGrAp 577—00 
C an A rt! 1X42—12 S&mvAp 013—82 


EnvmAp 942 +81 
GflnBt 953 — JB 

MIYld 1197— JOS WYldp 9JH +84 GvtEatyn 2X53 —12 GlabAp 1356 -J4 

IraMun nelX» —16 TFMN 1044 —86 Gradbaa McDanahb GtabBt 1X80 +43 

IrtBdn 1075—11 TF Not 1141—06 EsTVrt pn 2X9* — .15 GilnA 953 — 88 

InferGvfn 943 — 88 TF NY 1146-87 Govlncp 1346 — .10 GfcfjRx 1098 —.19 

toffGrl n 1033 + 74 USGvT 945—11 OHTFp 1157 —08 ( GfTech 1039 —47 

InvGBn 748 —09 Fortran lavs: OppVoIp 1845 — .14 1 GoWA 1658—161 

Japan n 1281 +66 ACSRtt 942 *81 GHMNTE 1061 — JM Gok»t 1655—14! 

LattoAmnl772 +41 Bondr 1X14 —05 GHPWTE 1071 — JM Pacflas 1671 +69 

LtdMune 1X00 —06 GlSlmx 9.10—11 Greensoroo 1470 — Jtt RsBkA 2058 —72 

LowPrr 1887 + 86 Muni net 11 70 —84 Guonflan Funds RflBkBt 2051 -73 

MiTFne 1X30 — .15 OHFraip 1179 — 85 AstAOoc H73 —12 [ J Hancock samara 

MNTFnel147 — 13 utflr 1116—75 GflGIrtl 1375 +J30- AchA 1X22—13 


Eurorap 1989 +71 RSI Trust: 

PtonrFd p2349 —31 ArfBd 2760—43 
PtoMBdpMJTS — 8* CDTO 3566—701 
InttGr 2*81 +63 EmGr 3670—58 
Ptonr lip 1951— 19 totBd 2000—19 
PtoTTm*p2Q54— 02 ST1F 1759 +41 
STInc X9* —01 Value 2078 —29 
TaxHee pl276 — JM Ratobawn 546—03 
USGvp 1065—12 ReaGrap 1365—11 
toer Jaflrar- Rtai* Hurt: 

BaiVRP 12J0 — 17 tC&BBrt • 1241 —15 
BnerGr 2X20 —39 CBBEq 1X10—17 


1141—87 CaflMup 1143— 0* 
1X07—13 Cpfricp 1162—14- 
1473 +.10 BnrGrp 1476-19 
1X14 —06 FUriSP 1063 —07 
1171-12 Grthcp 11^ —12 
1149 —87 Growth p 1283 —83 
1157—0* to»Grp 1141 +45 
1X53 -41 NatMup 1149 —06 
1*41—72 STGIp 263 —01 
1179—10 USGovp 1039—12 
"REIT — IT- S MBU rte Uf — "--r 
I 2172 +44 MDMul tnll.l A —04 
UStodln 1X55—11 
2760 —43 USlncTn 1X55 —11 
3566—70 VrtSqltn 1251—15 
3670—58 VrtEqT n 1251 —15 
3000 —.79 VAMoT n!142 —OS 


1759 +41 
2678 —29 


£582?-“ 

Europe 116* +76 
MandfiytoU.17 +42 
SpEqUfi h 1043 —11 
SpEauau 1049—14 


RflBkBt 2051 -23 


COPAPC 1X50—12 
EqlncA 1176 —05 
EqlncC 1176 —04 
eatovxlA 1X43 —21 
EqtovC 1X4* —70 


Tonsefp 20M— 67 __ ..... ... ^ . . _ 

TxFrB 1X45—0S PacEurG 1001 +64 SlrGwth n l'ffl —16 JncRelAx.954 — 86 

TxFrAp 1066 — 84 Sector p 1740—10 SirSTRn TL02 _ MIA 1947 +65 

Titnep 1019—37 Value p W55— 37 Sflain 1X10— M (ntffl • 197? +64 

TolRt A P 083 — 09 PlraifTNhC 1070 — JB StarBln 1172 —00 MoGavtAXZT* — 14 

TrtRtBn 078 — 09 ParfloaFds TSWEa 11.11—8* MuColAxlXH — 12 


Govtn 977— U DSIDv 1171-89 
Grlnc 1072 +87 DS1LM 945 —09 
InStGV 1157—05 FMAspc 1X43— 05 
insKWAdilXlO — JM KMSC 1086—12 
MNTE 1144 —85 SAMI PM nx9.92 +87 
NaflTE 1164 — 07 SrSWEQ n 1657 — 4* 


DSIDv 1171-89 InllC 1946 +65 
DS1LM 945 —0? CtaApA 1471 — 19 


FMAspc 1X43— 05 CflPApB 1465—1? 
ICMSC 1086—12 EquByA p 1ST? —14 
SAMI PM rn9.92 +87 GIGvtAx 1X35 —86 
SrSpEanl057— 3* incGraAplX50 —12 


TFCTp 1076 —84 GovSecA 761—07 
TxFrCal P1169 —88 HilncA 063 +J» I 


IrtWkn 1444 +40 MTFLn 1111 —88 I Growth P 1X57 —12 WMnvp 37.14 +43 AMTFn 1X17—M 


MooeBrai 7150 — 44 Wcri Eq 661 — 89 

Mkflndnr3A92 — 62 Forum Funds 


AstAOoc H73 —12 1 J Haacack smarera 
GBGIntl 1375 + JO i AchA 1X22—13 


TFFLp 540—83 HUncB 002 +86 

TFMOp 569 —03 InHEq p 1X76 +49 

TFNJp 564— 83 InllFxfnf 002—08 

TaxNYp 1142 —05 MgdAstB 941 —06 


USGvtp 942++JM 
VaKlAp 1452 —14 


BalKn 2354 —33 I TSWRx 1069—14 


SirSTRn 1X02 _ MIA 1947 +65 

attain 1X10— M lima • 197? +64 
StarBln 1172 —00 NtoGavtAX278 — 14 
TSWEa 11.11—86 MuCdAxlXK— 12 


IntlEq p 1X76 +49 Ovartand Express 
InttFxJnf 002 —08 AstASA 1159—22 


MUFLAX1349 —11 
Bdldk 2083 —30 TSWInfl 1354 +48 MuUdAx 041 — 85 
Edtodx 3X19—60 RchTtxsn l777 —18 MonNtAxT424 —12 
Grincn 2347 —30 R w itt era idi Funds MuNJAxMJl —13 
IntBdM 1X28 —10 AsWTl 1X20 _ MuNYAxUTO —11 

MJdGrLn 2175 —63 BoITrrK 1085 —13 SHTSY- 014 —04 


5mCoGrnl407 


STTreasn 9.98 -JJ6 


TFlrtBdreHUO —861 Tori 995 n 9448 —56 


IncoFdp 9J3 — 11 DuprwMutart: 
NWSOp 1457 -121 IrtGovn 1068—11 


Ambassador Ref A: Tar2000 n717B-144 TaxEXP 085 —05 KYTFn 7.76—01 

Bondi 1084 J TariOOSn 5X97—1 .46 USGovp 1X76—13 KYSMfn 031 — JH 

CoreGri 1788 - Tar20l0n 3759 —147 Oaaestofla Fuads EM Funds 

Grwtht 1379 Tv2015n 2X48 — 77 EaufiV 1587 —JO Equity P 59,93— 1JM 

IntBondr 10JJ0 _ I TartOTOn 20.18 —63 toon 1X70—10 FtoP 5452—40 

InttSikt 1444 .. TNaien 1068 —11 LMMc* l»J7 — 87 income P 4045 — 35 

SmCaGr 1 1487 _ 1 UtHIncon 9.95—47 Cam Mrturt: Eaton Vance 

TFinJBdt 1060 . Berner Group: Govt ia90 — 13 China p 1088 +55 

Amcara Vtotafle: 100 pn 1078 —28 Gnuth 1567 —16 EVStk 1X56-41 


InvBnd 1087 — JB Stock h 29JJ — 2 9i Baffip 1X72 —.14 

MtfleSecnlOTl —07 InvStk 244 —10 TaxEx 1043 —80. BandAtP 1555 —13 TFWAp 5J0 -83 

Muncpl ne 010 — 85 MEBnd 1050 — 84 US Govt 1X38—13' InvAp 1X12— 42 1 VrtuJtPPP 1147 —86 

NYHYn 1257 —00 TaxSvr 1X71—06 HTlnsEq p 1X22 — 89 ' USGvA P 1X27 —17 i USGovf 4.98 —86 

NYlns n 1243 —87 Founders Graare HTMaPIp 10.35 —JB • USGvBt 1046 — .17 ! Lutheran Bree 

NewMkfnUJl —11 Balnp 859—11 HraiifnCoto 9.13 . • J&VT2ol 1X10 — Jf? , Bre+fiYd 1081 * JJ6 

NewMfll 12J6— JM BlueChpnp657— JOB Hanover tov Fds ,KSMun 1248 —851 Raid 17.90—45 

OTC 2441 —52 Discvp 21.12—70 BKhGc 1X28 —43 KS IMunU 1266 — JJ3 1 income 098—08 

□tlTF ne 1157 —14 Frrtrnp 2011 —62 STGv 945 —87 1 Kaufman nr 352 —06 1 Muni 848 —U 

Ovrsea 29.16 +65 GovSec 957 —16 SnCcGr 1050 — 87 Kemper Fuads | OPPGr 1045 —38 

PoeSra 1956 + 47 Grwfhnp 1243 — .19 U5Gavt 1X14—12' AffiGav B5B .. ; MAS Funds 


Bondn 1240 —13' AchBt 1X16—14 
PCricAv 2055 —261 BrtAo 1072 —14 


TaxNYp 1142 —05 MfldAstB 941 — 06 CATEA 1150—06 
TFTXp 1067 —06 MfldAstA 9J4 — 05 MuIncA 1149—08, 
TF PA p 544 —04 MudAstC 944—86 SfrrtGrA 1361 — 13 

TFHIp 548 —04 RschBaK 961 —12 ST Govt 5183 +81 

TFMI 525 — JD TaxExA 861 —84 USGvJA 1004 —12 

TFWAP 5J0-83 TxExB 062 -JM VRGA 1D80 —.lit 


ST Band n 1049 —06 
SpGrn 3258—68 


Rraide and! Funds MuNJAxMJi —13 
Asian 1X20 _ MuNYAxUTO— 11 

BrtTTnX 1085 —13 SHTSY- <14 —06 
GFxWTVnTQJZ— JB USGvtA 1173 —07 


USGvJA 1044-12] TXEmBd 1)1034—86 
VRGA 1SJ80 — 81 Preferred Groan 


Vt*uApnpll47— 0* MiMutnc 1141 —05 PBHGGrji 15J9 — 65 AssetAnxll.lO -^21 


Equity 1067 —15 101 pn 1X05 —04 Income 945 —85 Growth p 014—19 

Fxinoo 1026—89 SmCaGr 354 _ TalRet 1473—16 IncBaSp 076 +84 

tototTF 1X51 -06 Bemsteta Fds Copley n 2051 — 69 MunBd x Hi-M —09 


Amer JUVchnad: GvShDun1X66 

Batann 12-47 — 12 1 ShlOurn 1X66 
Eaudvn 14.10— 74 1 IrtDurn 1369 
InttEqtv n 1X92 *26 i CaMun 1X81—85 
LMTrmnlOJQ -JM | DivMunn 1X73 — JM 
Amer Capital 1 NYMun n 1X72 —05 

CmstA P 1656 —27 InttVal n 1667 * 63 


GvShDunIXM— 05 CUroFuads: 

ShlOurn 1X66 —05 BolanAn 1071 —.11 


2177 -JB 
1X14 —86 
1044 —19 
1X04 — JB 


MunBd x 1060 —09 
STGW r 9.42 — JM 

STTsVP 5572 -JD 
SocEatP 034 —16 
TradGvt 1161 —09 
Trtxflrtv pxlJ8 —.11 
TrodTottp 071 —43 


NewMfll 124*— JM 
OTC 2441 —52 
OhTFne 1157 —14 
Ovrsea ».16 +65 
PocBra 1956 + 47 
Puritan 1029 +JD 
RjKVESIn 1350 — JB 
RctGrn ia46 


PFAMCaFdS Fxdton 1045 —JU TE FITr nxlOS— 07 AdGuAp 940 —82 

959 -81 Baton x 1058 —.17 Growth n 1348 —60 TaxFTTTrlX22 —13 AdmrAp 2751 — *7 

1038—13 CopAP nk 1375 —17 tofln 1252 +.16 VqlueTT nxl(>47— 17 AflGfAp 27.16 —65 

M.17—17 DfvLownxllT3— 13 STGovn 1X04 — 05 RettnlrarTr*. ApprAp 11.1B— 16 


Grwfhnp 1X83 —.19 1 USGavt 1XI4—I2' AdiGav 
Passcri n 1051 +.17 Harbor Funds BiueCh: 


BiueChP 1254 —43' Brtanced nil 40 
RartEstn 1350 — JB Stood pn 776—1* Band 1149 —89 CcH 749—85'. BnraCr nl762 — 49 

ReiGrn 1036 - WMwGrp|059 +JI CCnAppnl664 — 51 , CKvInai 064 +82; Eaufivn 2147—26 

ShfTBdn 953 —03 Fountain 5qqon» Fds: Growfn n 1352 — 44 • EnvSvc 1383—85, Fxdlrtl n 1160 — JB 

5TWMn 1X1* — .04 BatonoDd 1080 — 14 tofln 2018 +70 FLTx 1069—07 1 Fkdlncn 1151 — JB 

SmofflCap 1041 — 40 GotoSec 1X10 —JB InttGr >148 - Gtolrc 942 —06 GIFXin 1X59—89 

SE Aston 1569 + 68 MWCOp 1X35 —84 SifDgrn 941 —81 Gflh 1342 — JI ! HY Secsn 970 +82 

SUtSk; 1946—26 OurtBd 1X15—12 Vaiuen 1345 —19. HiYieid 106V +82 1 toflEqn 1546 +66 

SItOpoI 29J6 — 47 QuatGr 949 —14 Hearttand Fds Income 879 —88 LMDurFinl052— 85 

Trend n 6X08—182 Frankfia Group: USGvtp 1X56—12' IhhFund 1140 .34 flflNflkFc 1X49 — 86 

USBIn 1X90—11 AGE Fund *253- 82 Values 2467—15, MonSd 1X63 -88! MraSFxl 11.12-88 

UHlncn 1566 —20 Acsus 941—82 WITxF 1061 — M NYTF 1147 -87 1 Segin 1757—24 

Vahmn <741 _ ARS 9.99 — D! Hercules Fond: OH TF 1007 —87 SelFln 1048 —M 

Wrtdw 1X87 +.16 AL TF 12JM — JH EuroVl 1X37 .. Refirel 1172— .15 1 SeTOrtn 1X4! —12 

idfirtySeraara AZTF 1142— « LAmrVonX53 - 53' Refine2 1X48 —20' SmCpVlnl746 — 18 

Airr 1741 +83 Baflnv 2X12—41 NAmrGrin 10 J4 *.13 Retires 10.92—17' 5oFln 1X48 — JB 

AroGoid r 2360 +.12 Colins 1X43 —87 PdBVa! 1X72 -J3 Retired 941—18! Vrtuen 1269—11 

Aufar 2017 +.19 CAtotenniXB5 — 05 wseBd 1X01 _ STGtab 761 — JMlMFSc 

Bkfiechr 2045— 184 CrtTFrx 764 —85 Heritage Rarts SroCuEa 091 —85; MTTAp 1172—14 

Brdalr 2351—45 COTF 1X20 —05 CapAn>P1013 -44 Technal ia« -J0I MIGAp 1141 — 36 

Broker r 1026 +65 CT TF 1167 — 85 Divtncp 1045 - TXTF 1X45 —861 BondAM 1X73 — .17 

Chranr 3138 +.15 CvtSec 1255 +.10 tncGrp 1152—11 TotRetm 1X05 —87 \ EmGrAo 1080 — 33 

compr 2564— 39 DNTC 963—19 LMGavp 948 — O . USGvt 7.14 —SS7 GrttaAp 1144 — 19 


rxvinai 064 -82; EouBvn 21 J7 — 26 MqnuWMC 1X65—07 
ErvSvc 1343 —85 , Fadlrtln 1160 — jb , Mauler Funds 
FLTx 1X69—87' Fxdlncn 1151 — JB Fxlnl P 2156—29 

Glblrtc 9J2 — .061 GIFXin 1059 — 89 1 Gwthlp 2660—47 

Grth 1X82— 41 HY Secsn 978 +82 OhTnp 2X10—06 

HTYwto 1X49 +JJ2| tottEqn 1546 + 66 FxInT 2156—29 


1432 +66 Eaton V Lid Mhn 


CmstBP 1*56 — 47 B«wnFdnl867— 21 ValEaRpnlXM— 23 OHTxFf 1X29—05 


CpBdSpn 7. 18 —JS BerwynJncnIXJD +JM CPwenIGr 1152 —48 CoTxFf 1059-05 
CarpSdApx7.10— JB BhkudMCGll55— 41 CowenOp 1X54—16 FLTxFl 1X65—85 
EmGrC 2568 - Batmore Funds Crotte Hujoru MATXF1 1051 — JM 

EGAp 2560 — 53 Balanced 1066 —10 AstAflp 1X22 —.13 MITxFt 1041—84 

EmGrBp 2018 —53 Emntv 1051—11 Equity p 1015—14 NatTxFr 1 1X48 -83 

EntA p 1X31—43 Eqlndex 1X61—19 OR Mun N1X87 — 05 NJTxFt 1058 — 84 

EntSP 1X26 —44 Fizedlnc 9.91—10 Sperial n 1112 — 15 NY TxF I 1X61 —06 


OHTxFt 1X29 —05 UHlncn 1566 —20 
CoTxFf 1059- as vaiuen 4741 
FLTxFl 1X65— JB Wrtdw 1347 +.16 
matxfi 1051 -JM FideBy Setocts 
MITxFT 1X21 —84 Airr 1141 +83 


EatvtocA PSM — JB \ STFirinc 948—83 CrertPnndS Trirat 
Earnest 060 —081 SCMuni 1145 -86 Bondn 1X14—14 
EKCtlFdAll253— .97 Btanrtiunl Funds SI Bd n 1X13—89 

FdMflA P 1X40 — 85 JUnerEq n 957 — 48 SoEqn 1X07—88 
FM080 1261 — 85 FhTFBdn 018 — . 04 Vrtuen 1148—15 
GIEoAp IX 10 -42 Flexfncn 116—81 VJUMun 1068 — 87 
GlEaB on 11.93 -42 GtGr no 1043 +JJ2 CuFd Adin HUB 


1015 —14 NafTxFr 1 1X68 —83 
1X87 —OS NJTxF t 1X58 — JM 
1112 —IS NY TxF I 1051 —06 
Trust PA TxF I 1X67 — JB 

1X14 —14 EaimVMarattae 
1X13 —09 China t 1014 +65 
1X07 —88 ALTxFt 11.10 — JB 
1148 —15 A7TFI 1148 —86 
1068 —87 API TxFf 1054 — « 
1082 _ CaiMn t 1044 -JB 


4.98 -86 Midwest PFAMCaFdS 

fc ArSUSGvf 959 — 81 Baton x 1058 

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GA TF 1246 —85 IncoEcx 1X11 —.19 


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OH TF 1007 —57 5HFln 1058 —06 SffidT 2X52—14 

Rett* 1172— .15> SefVrtn 1362 —12 MontrGIdpllTl — 31 

Retire2 1368—20' SinCpVl n 1746 — >18 MorttrSlB 1744 —40 
Retires 10.92—17' soFin 1X48 — JB Mortuomery Fds 
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STGtab 761 — JMlMFSc GtabCom 1077 +.11 

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Technrt ltt«4 —40i MIGAp 1141 —46 IrtltanCopMSS +60 

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TotRetm 1X05 —87 I EmGrAo 1080 —43 SmGaon 1748 —27 

USGvt 7.14 —07 I GrOpAp 1144—19 Mora Skra Fds 
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an net 043 *81 1 GvMpA PX <50 — JW AskmGB I77S +56 

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taro San Fds lrtmBdS 972—10 

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toflBdn 7X29—11 Robeftsn SMdMSS UfflAp 1457—37 

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EmGrp 1849—49 WWPAp 774 


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GnnrihP 1660 — 45 EurpQt I4B5 +.72 
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Borcx Funds FdVaffit 001 — H 


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ESCORTS & GUIDES 

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LONDON PAHS BCOKI AGENCT Tfl: tEH -53* *fl3 EstaWdhad 18 raon 
CRBDfT CA8DS ACCEPTED 

UK 071 589 5237 LONDON UAZIUAN Escort 

Sense 671 73*5397/91 Open 7 do* 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Page 12) 


TAJ MAHAL Bris-t c r r rm 1 MuARA p 1X42 — 85 [ toflEa 1481 +58 CATFps 754 —85 

‘f °2 ea >. ‘ B ®=r 1 MuCAAs 171 —84 I RrafiYld 1048 —83 CrMlnm l«S7 —05 


■■■FiETTY WOMAN** 
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022 3219961 •*** 


ZUHCHBEGOC 
& Escort Sennee 

Zunth 01 / 383 06 55. 

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CHC Of MAYFAU 
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W 3351 ■ 2278 . open evravday oho MUNICH 1 WELCOME 
nwm Escarr & cum agb«t. 


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TOOiffiREADroiNVEVEY/MONTREUXAR^ 

Hand-delrvery of the IHT 
is now available on day of publication. 

Just call toll-free: 1 55 57 57 


ication. 


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MMPrGfn 7086 —.14 1 CBGTArt 7177 —40 


Grifik 1X12—22 
hUGr 1241 +65 
Wmlnc . 9^—tB 
InvGffid 945 —8* 
JJd to 1X39—87 
OHRjflSIKSS — 25 
OHTF 1148—05 
SoKSrSk 1X1* —13 


SmCop onJ441 —35 SpiVrtSt 1X44—83 
Value npx 1X92 —21 StUflK 1X16—14 
CcpAnpXl*46— 21 USCvtln 11.18 —07 


NYTxAnxll49 — JB 
ReflFAp 17 J* -M 
STGvIAp 268 . 

SmCapA 1052—85 
USGvA p 1080—13 
UHAp 952 -41 


UMAP 731 —4| BkxkGv 9JB— 83 

*«»> 1X19 —14 CAtaAp 1070—8* 

ATLBt 1755 +49 EqutAp MSI —14 
BtoAl 1540-43 EotneA ICO* —89 
Crtrat 1172 -82 HCnAf 1155 —12 


1X50—31 S^BTrrat 106 — 89 VaiSflc 1X19 —15 
WO— 20 S9T Funds - SoundStn 1*73—47 

Date GrihJnc 2585—52 5AM SC 1X65-76 
356 —49 Growth n T272 —60 SAM Vain 77.17 —12 
120—48 toll 1*62 +48 StfTYVlcnBd 1X69 — 12 
96* —82 ■UsAucnlO.ll —83 SoTrWjtS 105* —40 
951 —83 USGov 106* —07 $($>&. 3*87—181 

1070—8* snaurara SpfhCacb 9 JO — 82 

BrtTrn 1XM— ll 


OhrlTAn 1081 — BS! CmTcB 953 —31 j 
EmGTA 1147—J2I DvGrBt 2X55 —42 [ 


1457 +4* 

US 


uBurip 1X61 — iB 
COPCrT 1X63—15 
toGBT 1069—10 
toGrtenp HU9 —71 


I ‘COSMOPOLITAN* 

Jd CP i!; 4"e At». 

TVkllfc LQPOON 

ft.vsta Ekjm Se^wf- 
_ / Am ever .res Tel On 473 

... ... .. yfNUJ .. ... ... 

*•5-0 9 t “AGENCY" 
1 CAIL '.OfCCN (T - . • 4J2 • >33 


ErtnCJC M169 -.12 
EqtrtA 1169—11 
EqtoTA 1172 —.11 
EindTA 1X15—19 
HrtrfiM 1071 —04 
GAITAn 1048 — M 
GvtTAn 1060—10 
GvttCI 1060 —10 
mAAuTAnULX —83 
MEaTAnl26C +46 ( 
MflSTA n 1059 —IT ; 


EuGrSl 1X15 +41 
Grit* I 2X71 —43 


1466 —431 WSBtVB 1185— 8* 


GErei 1168 +.15 HiYIdA to 083 +83 
COrcgl 1184—8* toVtrA fp 1X57 - 

gW* H83 +.11 MuffiAp 1360 +82 
HBrtST 9JM +JM MuHIA 1160 —05 
E?Si. JM? - -I* PdDSrA 1755 +86 
InvGBl 11.11 


1261 —15 AnfAlc 1X96 —34 
1X63—15 CATFIa 1847 —03 
1Q69—10 CATF • 1143—87 
1067 —71 CrpSkn 3349—39 
1185— 84 Dvsto 1743—10 
HUP —85 GNMA 7147 —80 
947 — 84 Gttitac .15,18—13 


1X15+41 GvFIAlp 94* —11 STBtfTIrnlXIP — AS GNMA 1747—80 

2077 —23 GtQfkAp 1253—17 ShTTYTrn 947 — 8* Gttlinc .15,10—13 

1188 +.15 MYldAto 083 +JB VWtocTnlXJl — 13 USGovf X 1568 —30 

1184— M toVcrAfpl257 - VoUndp 1X49 —12 VUG 1X71 —U 

1143 +.11 MuffiAp 1360 +82 S rt oeoF rarts Stumfisft tovxfc ■ 1 

9JM +JM MuHIA 1160 — JB OrfTFrn 1X40 —81 Eouflvn 3163 —40 


ChinaAi 1143 -41 I MDHP 11.17—85 
IvyEflA T8 16 —29 , MDITA ll.lf— 05i 


£25/ 1.1 —11 5TG4AP 944 +81 Growth n 3X69 —35 

MHbrtrx 1181 —0* UfflAto 987— .11 HlYldn 962 +81 

NTnBl 1X28 —871 CrtMuf-ltn —JOS tocomn 1108— IS 
NYTxBlxtT49— 07' AdBf 967 —02 Morten 1*64—11 
Rwrat 17.14 -4* i EqufBrt 1481 —15 NWn 1250 — » 

STtiv«n 268 .! Eatrcni 1*81—87 USGov n 98* —09 


Equity n 1369— 32 L Fkdtnan a2I62— I* 
Growth n 2069—35) WFtonq Vk-,7 . 


HlYldn 962 +83 toflSqtynMJS +67 
tocomn 1088 —75 lnflFxinna«48— 13 


tocomn .10®— 1 is MFMnn2*48— 13 
Morten 1*64 —11 MATBBDH49 —89 
NWn 1250 — 89 -.Seorn 2033—19 
USGov n 98* —09 -STARn 1976 —85 













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SMS*-- —--Hi. 




Page 11 



Itew International Bond Issues 


Compiled by James E. Cotmsll • 


'*■ 


Amount 

(mHHoni) 


Mat 


Coup. 

■% 


Price 


Price 

and 

ensfc_ 


Terms 


(Me CEO Tightenm 



Floating RateNotas 


v 


CoimdTof Europe 
Resettlement Fund 


$100 1995 QjSO 100 


— Oww W* Libor - 

motto. M 0*425* far **. «****. «* mortte. F«s nd 
^sckscd. {Sctorpon Brother*) 


Chettwiham & 
Gteudieder BuikSng 
Sociely 


£100 1999 0.10. 99jbi 


— 6rar$<iwnlh Libor. a&± *ixp ar 

niblandi« .jnm,- rating total .to . OOO mSwo. Feet «* 


. Qoidmon Sachs . 


.C$150 2004. *. . 99to — . 


, iha 3«rth Banker* Acceptance rotes <W- 
FbwOOT*. IGolAnw'Sactotnnj 


Rabobank Nederland $100 1995 "i* TOO 


Over 5-owHh 

«*»«» dMwto ItoPeuBchc MortAI-S. * ** "* * 
between 147 and 1 M DM per DcflCr. {5aravel Mattoqa & 

Ca) ' 


Forced Out 

In Copper 

Scandal 


Cumpiiedby Our 

SANTIAGO —The chief execu- 
tive of the world’s big«st copper 


Kmghi-RidJer 

NEW YORK — The first io- 
crease in short-term U.S. interest 
rates since February 1989 will ben- 
efit long-term interest rates and 
help narrow the spread between 
short and long rates, analysts said. 

The Federal Reserve Board 
chairman, Alan Greenspan, an- 
nounced Friday a slight increase m 


Dec. 21 Meeting Set the Stage 


Bloomberg Businas .Vi-M traOCS. miu wwu^h, -- r 

WASHINGTON — Policymakers of the F«iei^R»ervc > ' ^ sal al Sanwa-BGK Securiti«. 

.. - \ i .v- jrtfiatirman; threat, decided iM to pusn P , . .jobi-nino “cannot bet 


Thursday and 4.10 a week rarlier. 
the highest since January 1993. 

“The tightening is going to be 
relatively good Tor the long end and 
people are putting in flattening 
trades." said Jaz Singh, vice presi- 
“ ■ He 


U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 


meeting. They were protesting 


Find-Coupons 


China. 


SljOQQ- 2004 6W 99^406 ??j0Q 


Swmvwdly. NondfabU ' 
. Lynch W1J - 


. Rh» 0375%. {Mend 


General Electric 
Capital Corp. • 


$250 1996 4% TOO*? . 99 JO 


Booffered at 99.99. Swnianairfy Jsw 1 £5 *** -® 0-0 " 

1*4. :■ - ' ' . 


Vatewagen Wl 
_ Finance 


DM500 1999 5K 102 99.15 


Re^ff^red at 99.80. P ' 

'-Sfacmfearik) ' 


Japan Finance Corp. 
for Municipal 
Enterprises - 


£100 2004 6H 99-Bt 


■— NmaAiJe. Fan 0325%. |S,G; Wortwg S«cuHtief.) 


the result of a scandal w $206 
million in losses on* 


On Friday night, Alejandro monetary policy 
chief of *" - - — 


■Royal Bank; of-. 
Scotland . 


*500 - 2004 00k 100.585 


boffnd 'at 98J935. Smehnuabf. NoncoBcto: Fses 2%. 
(S.G- Wartwp Socuritis*.) ' ■ 


S.G. Warburg Group . £125 -Perpt 9 101732. 


-- Undated, subwifrwtod bonds 

from 1999 to 2024 at pc* «£* 

UX giMXimt bond, wh«W « 

hwfem ectobta orty al par. {S.a W«feorg Soa**m^_ 


Compagrie Bonaire ■- FF2jOOQ 2004 - 614 ■ 101%/ 


Renault 


FF 2JXJ0 i 2004 6/f 10136. - 99.00 


100.40 K^nfcAin. Funmbta uWiduW^ j". 4 

- - . MBwf^ I QlKit c onim e rcMld.Franaj_ 

facflwod tf 99-6& NaneoflaHe. Foes 2%. pod U* Gfcnfcr- 


MS- 


9830 


NonaSdble. Reofftrad at.99.12. Fn» 1%. ?NG Bo*-) 



Toronto Dominion 
AustroBo 

Egulty-UnfcMd 

Honj^Cong Q«na 

Treasury priSsh 

Vu^n Islands) 


$120 . 1999 


Indudrid OecSt & 
bwestment Corp. erf 
India 

Itochu Fuel 


$175 2000 


MmhU. at 117« oi. Dec. 31. 19V7Cnteblo fawlWS et 
SfSinB.-inwfly bf OiiOJt ? 

at T3» or. mara of Ito “rveraon ****** 
GonvarAtai at 5.172 Honfl Kong dojtas. Oihar iwim «* b» 
fcV Fab. 7. (Dowia Socurw* Bankj 

MoncoBaWiL at 2^00 mpne* P 6 ^ 

3137 rupees par doUar, an 18* iwiwm. Fws 2JS%. U.P. 
Mvgcn Searritias.] 


$150 1998 


-Kfcredbbfe. &ch $10300 note wWi two worr orts 

10930 yen per doBor, a 2M* premM"- *** 
Bjropt4.. 


Noeoai, the chief of the company. 

released a preliminary internal audit 
that blamed senior managers for al- 
lowing Coddco's chief trader to run 
up the losses. 

On Saturday, the government 
said that President Patrioo Aylwm 
had accepted Mr. NoemTs resigna- 
tion and had appointed the deputy 
economy minister, Jorge Rodri- 
Kuez, to replace him. . 

Mr. Aylwm has ordered a judi- 
cial inquiry into the case. 

The losses were accumulated by 
Juan Pablo Davila, .the chief trader, 
who has resigned since the scandal 
brake. Mr. Davila told his supermre 
two weeks ago that the losses lad 
hegnn when he confused a buy mid a 
sSfordar. To cover up, he sard, ne 
began speculating in futures con- 
tracts on international metals mar- 
kets, and made 5,000 trades between 
last September and January. 

But the losses grew. Mr. Noemi 
said on Friday night that Mr. Davi- 
la had nm up losses of SI 64 million 

in copper contracts, $31 million in 
silver contracts and $12 muhon in 
gold trades. 

In addition. Mr. Noemi said, Co- 
delco was responsible for open fu- 
tures contracts that would repre- 
sent a loss of $100 million if they 
were closed out at current prices. 

Mr. Noemi had consistently de- 
nied the losses were a result of 
fraud. But on Friday night, he said 
nothing oould be ruled out. “tyery 
day I am considering a new view- 
point," he said. 

The prtfimmary audit said Mr. 
Davila had exceeded limits on his 
trading that allowed him to exptwe 
the company to losses of up to $1 
million. The audit further said 
there had been alack of siroerviaon 
by his superiors and by Codelco 
finance department 


The Fed’s new target for the fed- 
eral funds rate, the rate at which 
banks lend each other money over- 
night, is 325 percent. 25 basis points 
up from the 3 percent that had been 
the target since Sept. 4. 1992. 

The Fed’s move “will ultimately 
benefit the long end and flatten the 
yield curve," said Robert Bannon, 
who watches the central bank for 
the consulting firm IDEA. 

The idea is that the Feds vigi- 
lance about the potential for infla- 
tion in the future will reassure inves- 
tors in longer-term U-S. Treasury 
securities. These investors normally 
demand a yield premium for hold- 


divided over the degree of inflationary threat decided not F ±e tuning “cannot be just 

buerest rat« at Ute^dera! Open Market Comnuttee meeting on Dec. -1 ■ a ^£^1 move," but the 
The FOMC left that move for last week s ^ start of a new ugbteiung cycle. 

Minutes of the December meeting “It’s not 25 basis points tfaai trill 

normal six-week delay They a f the make a difference." he said/nte 

Angeil and Lawrence Lindsey, voted by the long end had been exjiectmg a 

- wbai they teit was a sjuoB^ tightening and it’s reassuring not to 

have to deal with uncertainty." 

Investors in longer Treasury se- 
curities had been growing con- 
cerned that the Fed might remain 
, , , .on accommodative too long and 

“Sj £d laid the groundwork for Friday's impest rare lelinflatioflary pressure build upas 
■ Ir JSfKSSff savina that when they pushed up rates, they should the u s economy picks up steam. 
mnl^fKpir move at an FOMC meeting, not between meetings, for fear of uncer tainty had played a role 

SSSSSdi ££ y^r-end «** “ rf 45 lon 6 «< 


andid over SM» duaon of Ibe Federal Open Mar- ^ ^justed promplly," minuies of the -wtanent 


The benchmark 30-year _ bond 
fell V* of a point, or $7.50 per SI, 000 
bond, to dose at 98 17/32 Friday. 


Indeed, shoner-ienn U.S. Trea- 
sury securities suffered the heaviest 

^-s£Tp ! a , ffi 

S£“r d,o " is 

“^-^™ .0or 30 pobu 10 ^8/31 Its yield atr^d 


since November, as a year-long ral- 
ly ran out or gas. 

“I think it would have been dis- 
turbing for the long end if the Fed 
had not done anything, said Marc 
WansheC vice president and econo- 
mist at J. P- Morgan Secunties. 

“There is some initial reaction hi 
which the entire market is going to 
be hurt." he acknowledged. “But m 
the sense that the market isconfi- 
dent that the Fed is ahead, this will 
benefit the flattening of the curve. 



The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, Feb. 7-11 


Tanayong Pubfic 
Company" 


$130- - 2004 . 316 100 


>■- ssssssffasatitsffivsrn : 


Bank Gorp4 


W."’ 


•Tata Iron & Steel 


$100 1999 ^214-ZK 1W 


2»*. Term to h^mbrfora Frf>.a |C5 Fint Barton. 


United Engineers 


$200 2004 


100 




Coddco’s head of sales, Owen 
Guerrini, and his deputy, Carios 
Depsch, have resigned as welL 
Mr. Noemi said Coddco’s board 
was never informed erf a change in 
policy in October 1990, when Mr. 
Noemi authorized Codelco to act 

as a trader for tbe first time, specu- 
lating by buying and sdhng futures 
not backed up by the companys 
own production. 

(Reuters, Knighl-Ridder) 


A schedule ot Ms n®«*'s ocartotmc end 
fintmeitd evens, compiled tor the interna- 
to^HeraktlriiMiiwttyBloerabargBusi- 

nessNewa. 


Asia-Pacific 


Jamrary bar*, depos- 


• Nfa. 7 Tokyo 

its and lending- 

Tokyo DeeemtHw and 19B3 current ac- 
count figures end December domestic 
and foreign securities Investment, rore- 
case Current account surplus up 13.0 
percam in December, to S13.0 WlUon, 
1B83 a record H31.B blflion. 

Hong Kong Thirtmuarter gross domes- 

Ptco Par East HoM- 

n Tokyo Government loeutjmh 
tw-relonr proposals 
Tokyo Yukioitagaki. chairman of toe Ja- 
pan Automobile Parts Industry Assocte- 
Son. to discuss JapwvU.S. trade dls^Jte 
at the Foreign Correspondents Club of 

expeded imemanonai Bank 

a Tokyo Forecart fiscal 19Wt 
national growth. 

Tokyo Bankof Japan Gover nor Yasush i 
Ulenoto o*va regular press conference. 
WeVngton September quarter balance 
ot payments. 


Europa 


De- 


eEioectedtfalmwak F renM«t _ 

camber producer prices for eastern Ger- 
man expected through Tuesday. 

Frankfurt January cost of living moex- 
Forecasn Up 0.2 percent m month, up 3-7 
percent m year. 

Fnmkfurt December retail sales. Fore- 
cash Down 3.0 percent In year. 


Madrid January unemploytnenL 
Amsterdam Consumer price index. 
Forecast Down 0.1 percent in month, up 
2.D pereem In year 

■ Fab. 7 Frankfurt German metal In- 
dustry wage tarns resume in North Fthine- 

WestfaJitL 

London December consumer credit. 
Forecast No change hrom £290 million. 
Ports Third-quarter industrial produc- 

"m.b Frankfurt West German Jan- 
uary seasonally adjusted ixiampioymeni. 
Forecast Up 30.000. East German Janu- 
ay nonadjusted unemployment. Fore- 
cast Up 45.000. 

London Bank ol England releases quar- 
terly bulletin and Inflation report 
London January cyclical indicators tor 
the economy 

e Fob. 9 Frankfurt German Bundes- 
bank allotment of secunbea repos. 
Frankfurt Second round Ol German 
banking-sector wage talks. 

Parts Survey ot French investment in 

January o second round of 

German public sector wage talks. 

Paris Bank ot Franca council meeting. 
Oslo January consumer price Index. 
Forecast Up 0.1 percent, up 1.6 percent 
in y83f. 

m Ft*. 11 London November mer- 
chandise trade. Forecast £900 million 

Madrid January consumer price lndex_ 
Forecast Up 0.9 percent in month, up 4-9 
pocent in year. 

Porta Provisional fourth-quarter em- 
ployment 


The Americas 


Eqmcted ttris WMk BoanosAtres- 

Many companies to announcequarterly 


earn mps for period ended Dec. 31 be- 
tween Monday and Friday. 

• Fob. S Beverly Hills, Calilomla- 
Fourth Annua] Digital Hollywo od Ex po- 
sidon sponsored by computer, software 
and entertainment companies to show- 
case multimedia opportunities. Througn 
Fob- 9 

e Fab. 7 Washington President Bill 
Camon proposes ho 1 995 rscal year bud- 

Brssllla Economy Minister Fernando 
Hannque CwtJoso addresses nation on 
h« economic plan. Officials irom iniema- 
ttonai Monetary Fund scheduled to arrive 
for lafiis on Brazilian economy. 

Naw York Two-day annual Utility Merg- 
ers & Acquisitions Symposium. 

Houston Compaq Computer Corp an- 
nouncement ol Gontura Aaro. «s first sub- 
notebook personal computer, to compete 
against earlier entrants from Hewlett- 
Packard Co. and Gateway 2000 Inc. 

Austin. Texas SEMI, the U.S. semicon- 
ductor industry trade 
meetings on new technical standards as 
wall as ultradean manufacturing prac- 
tices. Through Feb.n. ^ 

Albuquerque, New Mexico Amenran 
Defense Preparedness Association, Ro- 
bot.es and Automation Conference, with 
government, academic and industry rep- 
resentatives discuss ng the latest ad- 
vances in robotics and automaton and 
mar potential uses lor da lens-related 

purposes. Tnrough Feb. 10. 

Earnings expected Canadian Pacific, 
Chrts-CrBtt Industries. CPC International. 
Dirlf & Phelps, Ekco Group. Jones Appar- 
el Group Inc.. Lockheed. Long island 
Lighting. Service Corp. international. 

gtwwboat Inc., Time Warner, TranscoEn- 

a Washington Productivity and 

costs lor the fourth quarter. 

Brasilia Congress scheduled to vote on 


key element ol govemmenTs economic 

Ottawa Monthly houang starts report 
Minneapolis Northwest Airlines unions. 
w niehr«*Ned convertible prelerrod 
stock this summer In exete^ torv^ge 
and benefits cuts, must deckle whethwra 
convert it Into common slock now or wait 
another io years. , . 

Earing* expected AUted-Sgnal. Amer- 
can CyanamW. Anheuser-Busch. Bruns- 
wick Corp.. Greyhound Lines, Kroger. 
Morrison Knudsen. Ryder System. Tyco 
Toys V F Corp.. York InWmational Corp- 
m Feb. 8 Mexico City January infle- 
tion. Outlook; UpO.B P«ce^0 peroant 
Washington Two-day Federal Telecom 
Conference explores growth «n sales ot 
equipment to the U.S. govemmart- 
Earring® expected Aetna LHeS Caaral- 
tv CBS. Ford Molor. Goodyear Tire A 
Rubber. Macmillan Boedd, Unum Corp. 
a Feb. 10 Washington initial weekly 
cafe unemployment compensation insur- 
ant* claims. , 

Wearington House Ways and Means 
subcommittee hows final hearing on 
health-care reform. _ . . 

Sao Paulo February inflation. Outlook. 
39 percent tor the month. 

WUmington, Delaware Columbia Gas 
System Inc. bankruptcy court hearing on 
a variety ol matters In the long running 
Chapter 11 case. 

Boulder. Colorado Celestial Season- 
ings holds its first stockholders meeting 
since the herb tea manufacturer went 
public. 

New York Honeywell Inc. nolds an ana- 
lysts meeting. 

Earrings expected BJF. Good*™- 
tmnsti MUacron, Corttmenl^Ck^EJv 
serch Corp.. Fairchild Corp.. FVermng 
Cos. General Motors. Hasbra 
Illinois Toot Works. Noranda. Sataty- 
KJeen. Smith international 


«t V 


MARKETS: Double Trouble 

ecoDCHmc growth, i^idi m lhe ly. en qouray T x»ro^J^ n<iTi ^ Friday almost as much as a full 
forth quartet was running at. an been shoppmg^^dfOTr^^ 3 return on Treasury bills ot 

SBxr»p««SS. Emi Jjsm 

continue wefi m excess of tne ip 


STOCKS: New York Seems Stable 

who put money into the market on 


Lost Week’s Merkels 


M figures ore os d dose et trading Friday 


markets Friday radicwe oonn 
will keep falling- TWs « a 


Stock Indexes 

united unto* Feb. 4 
DJ Indus. 


Iment 


to cut 


at the Bundesbank^ fi 

interest rates.iast weA,^ ■ •_/ .* 
Tl* ■ quarter-poini mcreMe m 

^by the FtakM Bcnati 

on Friday can duly feed fears ^ 


pacent rate believed to be conss- 

teni with stable prices. 

The obvioos beneficiary rromau 
flris is the dollar, whidi advancea 


of ; German rate cuts 
prospects of coboonnc Tvxnay 


SiEtKforecast tothjsy^ : Jtos 


.^dollar benefits from an up- 
tB± in stort-tenn interest ratesbe- 
caose tins narrows the gap against 
German levds. That gapjtiD re- 
wide — about 200 basis 


even after the Fed’s rate increase. 

There are, of course, always con- 
trarians. Some economists think uk 
economy is not as proroaous as it 
jpears to be and Friday’s maAet 
iSge could be the beginning ofa Japoil 
slide. Many investors are. UKay Nlkke! 225 


DJ Trans. 
5 & P 100 
5 A P 500 
SAP Ind 
NYSE CP 
Brttria 
FTSE100 
FT 30 


rids t«wcamg Sto — and that is expected to 

Eurajpc, wham haw assumed me g; . 4^ Antiar^c advance. 


reooveryis 

Another 


is just around the opsner. 


worry for European 


nstrairi the doDai's advance. 

. The dollar did sur« on Friday, 
rviw»»- dCT™g at . 1.7610- DM. But Mr. 

stod: marixts is Suncsaid tim snmriy ‘Jmts a floor 

rise means for the hesfj underneath thedSar. u s now un- 

likely to weaken substa nUaBy, b ut 


The rise in inte rest ra tes 
also is Ekdy to boost returns on 
certificates of deposit and money- 
maricct accounts, economists said, 
but not enough to have mvestots 
abandon stocb, which have drawn 

money away from these safe but 

low-paying tftenratives. Samtider Friday’s dedine “a tay- 

sen said .on tdevision on^nday heads an economics con- hseJSsh 

that the simation was far Song &m in Springfield, New 

from Blade Monday m October tMtlV ^ ^ Qje wrong SSH 

1987 , when the D^dl 508 p^its he said. The stock market WSCI 

^bem totally 

ile putting money into stoats 


1871^2 

22031 

\X2A32 

43157 

4WiH 

547J6 

26131 


Jan. 28 org« 
1WM3 -138% 
22SA2 —231% 
1A34J? —045% 
4iim —168% 
478.70 —136% 
554.90 -132% 
26542 —139% 


147540 

2A6BJBD 


344740 + 081 % 
2A3930 + 1-11 % 


20301. 1B|75B. +833% 


213825 2,13347 + 032% 


Sang 1215730 1137730 + 685% 


(J7JV *1830 + 104 % 


Money Ratos 

Untted suites 
Discount rote 
Prime rale 
Federal funds rate 
Japan 
Discount 
Call money 
3 ^nonm interbank 
Germany 
Lombard 
Call money 
j-montti imerbonk 
Brtfclw 

Bank base role 
Call money 
3 -monlh Inlerbank 
Goto Feb - 4 

London pjn. flx3 38850 


Feb. 4 
300 
600 
3 U. 


Jan. 28 
300 
600 
300 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COUID AFFECT 
YOUR LIFE: 


2Vfc 

TM 


134 

23/16 

2V« 


6 1 - 

585 


6=W 

6 ’- 

5.90 


: .l 

Ttinamiktn 


5Vj 
59/16 
5 7/16 
Jan. 28 


5^1 

SVs 

57/16 

ai'w* 


37035 +271 % 


rise means »v*-— , , 

American money that has pto"** 
inio and faded 

St nortcts. Wifl ihis flow now 

behidted? Wfflit ^ 

-Martels .me beaded for a yc^- 
bly vicious correction. 

Crane, a 


it’s not 'about to move rampantly 

high**-” 

Paul Chertkow, London-based 


“1 th ink there’s a real-for-sure 
aarection coming. So mst^d of 
this bring a buying opportunity it 


for tire next kg of the mny- ^ 

^TVhae.US. stodc poces. 

*Swiih the Dow^Jonesmto 

Wma age off 

owe Hat tire bond mart* kg”* 
cool The yield cm 30-year 


Friday, Reuters reported. At that 
trrw you had short-tenn interest 
rajes virtually twee wbal they are 

now so people had a place to go to 

^ aEsss^atjas: 

H. Lynn Hopewrii of the Mom- 
tor Group, an investment advisory 
Seam- firm in Falls Church, Vir^nm, 
Nevfyofc ' however, urged his clients nm to 

yondlhat.’r •••■• •••••. *TWs true, of comae, bm theme ^^^TdStwho left 

The timing of tire expected aus ^xetorn on alternntive assets in January of 

m German rates is now tire mg jg also histoncally low. iog7- “When he got back, in De- 

^^^Bumksbimkfailedto ^ Mr. J^beSlSidsaid, -How^d 

SraS Iasi ’week, as manyMd money-market mterat rag « IdSrWe said, “Fine. You made 6 
Honed because of over-target aboilt 3 percent, “dividend yield is 

in tire money supply-. The ^sh, Stb^rish” for stocks.] 

SSdMbank cited exunordinary Although Friday's loss mi Wall 

fnr+i* enrn-t 1 m Decembers Cm-* one *hi> worst smee Nov. 13| 


World Index 


From Moroai StanW Caudal 


inTi 


! toovi '*• 4 " ■ ,w, ^ v 

follow the world every day in the iht 

S5r£j?z47 0/0 SJTrt, 


CALL US TOLL-FREE 

AUSIBA S«8I* gSS' ISff* 

GBMANY- 0130 848585 


UMTEPMNGDOM; 080089 5965 
. / 

Or se nd In the coupon b dow. — — — 

— — m — _ 1 o =n 3 months I 


CURRENCY AND ( API I AL MARKET SERMCE5 


prospects for 

ax^flyst ai Dititwi Bmik of Swte^- near afl-time lows," The 

land and a-tonBtooB-d^JgJ- J^Saied Press quoud Edward 
^^mmno^ ^dS' Yariem, chief ectmonnst at CJ. 


Currency Management C owownoMljc 
Wincheaer House, 77 iMMhnWdl - 

TeL: 071-582 9745 Fac07t-j82»lS7 


24 Hour London Dealing Desk 
Competitive Rates & Dally Fax 
-»/i fnr further information & brochure 



' Help 1 Which markets should t invest jm 

G^aQiiOSilon lor P C!i p9' c .j'^' 


CDiiwTy.'CixiencY 


I Setoum 


BF/. 


12 mo nine 
*2 monttn 
FREE 


6JXW 


1430# 


Denma* 

Fntierd 


GewHjw* 


Grtfew 

IreMnJ 


2.400 


1J50 


700 

210 


% 

EAVtNQS 
tort yoar 


37 


-49 


0 months 
♦ 1 roonlh 
FREE 


3J00 


1JQ0 


1300 



W" 5 SiSaS' -SS 5 ^^ 

vestment-ted business reewy in»=«t rates. tv™ Amnned 58.33 pornts, a de- 

Rrrt Uhich Beckmann at Deui 
cdte Bank in Frankfurt dismissed 

these fears.- “This is not 

at tire Bundesbank frran eas- 


notm; 


are high 

c o ntinue to 
warn 
ifiritfm' 


Dow dropped 38J3 points, 
dine of neariy 13 percent 
As long as tire American econo- 
my expands, there wifl be an up- 
ward bias to stock pricra as comp*- 


Evromarls 
At a Glance 


Thousands do v-;y/ny. sbcu!dn;t . /pu? ■ 


tf yrt nftcertgrnty 
■roiIUJ5.marirets«^ 

tlwFed'smcreaseisomy - ‘^over 200 baas, mesr^rismgeanr^anuu^ 

d '^ C an mS .».Fridw.too ; ^ 

another nse erf a the uaBy appreciat ed . ^ mnnih-frf January the Dow m- 

Mr. S35 T iS|. 6 percent, 

"SSSS 5 £-fc -S' rrSwSS -SSL - &e hw.M 

“^ John _!L?22nm ^ Onfy rsudd^ agnd«ant 


Eurobond Yields 

Feh.4Jon.je YrtflO# Yrto* 

UAl.'-W" g £ 

as.s.ewmttrm ^ 

OAtetorttma *M ^ 

I'nxill llrrllM 627 627 

wStnwa W ^ 


loans. 




dnstrials 

3?^3? 0 lart" Monday. Indeed tire 
index remains higher than where it 
started the year. Thus, an investor 


iwum 

Danish kroner 
Swetthknn 
ECU, Iona tens 

EGU'adnttro 

COILS 
JM.I 
HXI 
YM 


735 

635 

7.W 

5» 

647 

US 

4.13 

307 


751 

621 

736 

as 

539 

638 

660 

627 

in 


111 
639 
557 

112 
637 
7.n 
626 
550 
672 
674 
639 
111 


621 

545 

6H 

626 

537 

7J1 


For further details 
on bow to place your listing contact : 
PATRICK FALCONER in London 
TeU ( 44 ) 71836 4802. 

Fax: (44) 71 2402254 




629 
734 
618 
531 
638 
659 
539 
2 tt 


ud 


1 iiwmhaum 


Hrttexbe* 


14X00 


NUI 


Portugal 

Scan 


385 

115 


3 mootm 
*13 FREE 


1X00 


6200 


1X50 


210 


a? 

47 


- rand Ofctfi. LlaOnd 


Swadcn laemnul 


55.000 


3.100 


- hand Otfaw 


Sttwrtand 


Hmi al Eaw d CEi 


3X00 


CO. N AJnea. 'am*! 
Fr&rcn MnaV' 


Guoi Stales. *sn C*mJ and 
grant. Amenta 


i 


Reaid ftWcfl 


93 

VA 


275X00 

7.700 


1X00 

28.000 


27X00 


1.700 

1X00 


22X00 

68 


150X00 

4200 


1X50 

14X00 


14X00 


14X00 


1X00 

1B5 


hM oai ud 15 granted lo» ajl ow oriora 

lhe IHT. This is the subscription term l prefer 


See, te: Luxembourg StoeK Excnanae. 


WMkly Sales 

prtfflprv Mattel 


FBb.4 


INtcnH AT I o N /L 


Busme 



Yes, 1 wont to Start receiving 
(riieclt expropriate boxes): 
n 12 months (364 issues in all with J- bonus issijes). 

U □ 6 months {182 issues in all with 26 bonus issues). 


□ 3 months 191 issues in all with 13 ^ u . s 

check is enclosed [payable to the ln ^^^ r T ^T J - 
3 American Express (T Oir^rs Qub l, VISA 
□ MasterCard Eurocard L 1 Access 

CfBdit cotd chorQfii be inode in Frend. Froncs ert currant sxchonge nstes. 


My check i 


ShimBehMlheSame, In Europe 

I y . c/.p. u» rr~. • - :mi hording « «« ?«*“““ 




hanesin France 
weave 


Stales, 


strife direction. And although none 
of. them are likdy lo be as wide 
open to UJS- investment as Britain, 
ail are ecpected to need 1 the mMMy 


StraMOU 


FRHt 
ECP 
ToW 
w : n m tefv 


oxw E r viH Ld 

c MqoS 1 IM® 
23450 557.» M72J0 

1S0 261 e WJ» 

UX0 7JB 7BM BlUJ 
Uf9J0 1.987.1# 1IW9^° 

U4I0 2J773#1SJ96» W» ,ia 


Cat* 


»he doBsre The best arampie is' Britain, ^d*^otise that Am«ican «sn- 

areiriativ^awd^®^^^ roles cm fosi^ own- ^ s 

md.it is M ye* yield. S^Screated networks that are caraed-OTer ca- 

«aiocy f« eanpamfiS;^ wfflbe fines or sent direct mto Europe' 

BatthatlasttHsmWf 8 ^^amtractras for tireswafled ^ jiaaes $ satellite, American 

'dcabjta» 05. infomiatkm.supedBghwiy. ••• also face a d^aon on 

■JSSSSSSSS^Z flte:eto«!to> how Enr.van they ihould be. 

d KTiI«Mi«icra 1 > les0 “ l . 


Eurodew 

| hma 

nS mu w*>*5 

4M648 1.1S4JMW2870 6^ 

4^5638 «B40 W2L ? 

26491X6 3SJ29J6 764S1S 63,602X0 


SMM8 
Convert. 

FRM 
ECf 
TOM 

Sourot: Earactoar. osW. 


Libor Ratos 

1 UMn 

UX.J 

DMfitrtieteartc m 
PwMrterttM S* 

nme&feanc t'h 
*cu 41171* 

YH 1WU 

Sources: Lloyds Bank Reuters 


hnonth 

» 

515/14 

57714 

4% 

4VS 

» 


ft*-* 

fi-rannffl 

in 
jun* 
5te 
414 
*3rt* 
2 3714 


This week’s topics: 

O Carmakers Chaise Into The Developing World 
O Japan: Is A Recovery In The Making? 
o The Yanks Will Come On Strong In Vietnam 
o Russia: New Threats To The Private Economy 
o China: ‘Red Capitalists’ On The Takeover Trail 


Now rtuaiiahle at your newsstand! 


s 


cardacct.no 
exp. date 


SIGNATURE- 


'S SjekotoeS^ease fixate YOUR yai numb® 


IHT VAT number FS747320U 1261) 

D Mr 2 Mn C. Mbs FAWHY NAME. 


RRSTNAME — — — 

PERMANENT ADDRESS. - HOME Zi BUSINESS. 




BnsInessWeek InlBrnatlonal 
14 av d’Oucby, CH-1B06 Lausanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
c, ...hmintinns call UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2939 


OTY/CCOE. 

COUNTRY., 


TH.. 


.FAX. 


HT, 


France. 


F«dc 


This offer expires March 31, 1 994. and is orabcie » new 


lVTJTi> ITI' 1V.U. t"*d 

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itiscifcers onk' 

7-2*94 




CHGI/8 



Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1994 


China Caps Stock Issues 
At Last Year’s Level 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


CanyiMty Our Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING— China, as pan of its 
dnve to cool the economy, has 
capped expansion of its stock: mar- 
kets at 1 993 levels, the official Peo- 
ple's Daily reported Sunday. 

The State Council Securities Pol- 
icy Committee has set a quota or 
5-5 billion yuan (S632.1 million) of 
new issues to domestic investors 
this year, the same as last year's 
quota, the paper said. That means 
another year of cautious growth 
following a flood of 13 billion yuan 
in listings in 1991 

"This year, new stocks will be 
released at a suitable time, taking 
into account the capacity of the 
market and the speed of its expan- 
sion." the paper quoted Ma 
Zhongzhi, the committee's deputy 
director, as lulling a national meet- 
ing. 

Mr. Ma declined to detail the 


quota for sales of B-dass shares, 
traded only by foreign investors, 
the paper said. 

China's three-year-old stock 
markets in Shanghai and Shenzhen 
have slumped since Beijing tight- 
ened credit to cool the economy 
last June. 

Meantime, China's stock market 
supervisory committee fined a 
Shanghai brokerage 2 milli on yuan 
for illegal insider dealings during a 
takeover raid, the Shanghai Securi- 
ties News reported on Saturday. 

The brokerage made a killing on 

inside information last year when a 
real estate company from Shenz- 
hen. Bao An Enterprises, launched 
a hostile raid on Shanghai Yanz- 
hong Industrial. 

An affiliate of Bao An revealed 
details of the raid in advance to the 
brokerage. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Vin Agance Fnmftna 

Amsterdam. 

The Amsterdam stock exchange 
held onto its positive mood last 
week, the CBS all-share index clos- 
ing at 293.1 points, np 1.17 percent 
from the week before. 

KLM featured after announcing 
a surprisingly good third quarter. 
The stock price advanced 10 per- 
cent to 52 guilders. 


Frankfurt 


The German market enjoyed a 
strong beginning to the week, but 
fell back from Thursday on disap- 
pointment at strong money supply 
growth and steady interest rates. 

Some traders had hoped the 
Bundesbank would cut at feast one 
key rate, but the central bank de- 
cided to make no changes. 

The DAX index rose by a mere 
0.23 percent on the week, to 
2,13825 points, and traders said 
the market remained more volatile 


MOVING 



GR05P1R0N 

The Inf I movers 

Atom) tha *«arW 
raHufl,. vMy 

*6h a bend), perioral touch I 
ToL Pom 133-1) 48 It 71 71 


&{MTERDEAN 

HX A FEE ESTIMATE CALL 

PARIS (1) 39201400 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Attention visitors 
from ^13 U.S. ! 


BE MY VALENTINE 

DonT forge! your load one lha 

ai i Monday. 14th W n gy 

| (Decrftne 2pm the Friday befcre(. 

| You cotid mn win the $600 fim prize 

CaH Paris (1) «37 93 85 
or Fax (1] 46 37 93 70 

Or axifact your boat WT office. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 




PASS 

“flETTK THAN A HOIH." 

■. t/ry. i 

International 

Off® YOU II 

QUALITY APAKTMB'dS 
• Luxury finished 


• FJhr equipped 
• Modi hm semes 

■ Speoai rata for long Am 
• In front of “Mm Sane" 

■ Ck»e to the GM T —sr 

and Tioaxhro" Square 

Bras staring at US$700 per week 
Far further infoneafan & wn wtoi 
caO 1-4525 9501. Fax 1-4288 2991 




• -eading the IHT 
v.'-.-r, .-.j :;cvei, why not 
■ : ■: it at home ? 
5anr.e-33>- delivery available 
m >:i'Y Ui. dries. 

CdiJI) £00 S82 2084 

(in New Yw* <dl 212 752 3890) 

ilcr^h^^enbunc. 


TAX SEMINAR- AAPO's onnud revmr 
01 US French flies & dunces Wed 9 
FeLk cJO pjn Vw, Pen; 10b, 71 
(TrfwrjoH hVxYn 'SaBedaMirtogei. 
Osrw'dPublKFIJO.siiembijo he* 


| ZEADS&AIEADVISSD 

j that thv International 
j Herald Tribuna cannot bn 
■ held rasponabh for lots or 
demogot incurred as a is- 
( suit of transection* item- 
mins fcc-n cdwr ti scmm t s 
J which appear in our paper. 

! It is titanhn rccammond- 
] ad that roodsn mako c&- 
| propriete imjuiries before 
• Scndl -.3 any money or on- 
tarns into any binding 
commitments. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


IPJSH NON-RE5(Ca4r 
COSAPANXS £195 

Vih.-. -.± r y 

• '■*? o. &rw»n. So*. 
! :- rr-.-< hrv. 5 dV< 
3.:'--'-. i—rarf imw <vx 

rr.di Murphy, Director, Scwrugn 
C y i x ny Scrntos, SC fitroOTion 
S^usre Dublin 2, (retold. 

Td -2b2 T 6618490 Fa* 6*18493 


AVAILABLE CAPITAL 

.- 1 r._r. :b'e -c- 

-j.,-' " it* • •- 

:rr. 'ws 

; rc p-t wc __ _ 

Fcr Ee! ya eaH II Croup, Inc. 

AlPr FL-aowci Department 
Fax (5071 S3 SDJS (renown). 


7KAVE. DCCJM2STS -i-.'iwLa, 

»■— «t.j -'v;. p-cwci 

r-t* --spr 

- C •■’•S.Cjf} 
L_ V C. M* ■k.U 


CTTShCaj CCMrANSS Pc' her 

i.. c c. Is* 

U ;l "-*■ ' r. i r O. -U.ii '4a£S5 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

New protect with stwfo to 5-roan 
apxSnemj andatfe. Pano ra ra c view, 
dnn»He office awe, attroane pnee. 
Fwther deft*. Sto: Bodaoen - &BW. 
9 aw tT Ostende . MC 98000 Monaco. 
M; (33) 92 16 90 00 


IBIZA, 400 SOM. VULA wiih faitos- 
tt seavrew. 8000 sg.nL plot Excellent 
eandnan, 4 badroaira with b ii f tuo n g . 
Indoor Manning pool with sowto. 
Severd terrace; fi pain Wo & 
brochures n-L'fca +3580^)157621 or 
Id: + 35849-740130 or Mrs Fofteuan. 
Eo# 534, 0010QI Hebmfa. Rnfcmd 

SWITZERLAND 

IOVBY APARlMBfTS. tala Geneva 
or mawilaiB. Kecnorubh' pneed. San 
Financial SA TeL 41-11029 00 49. 
fax 4|Q| 329 00 n 

USA RESIDENTIAL "" 
MAUI HAWAII, OCEAN FRONT 

Can**. $2).0QQ+ dawn/M price 
S14QjOQO + . In-home fmanang - no 
gwJIying. Cal 24 hours. TeL &08-66S 
0660-fax, 608669-1328 USA 


OFF5HCXS COMPANIES 

’ fa* frafenwnd mnuttaftars 

* WorUwtoe mcoporanans 

■ InuredoJe awxljtity 

* FU) conhdeiAd wrvrca 

* London < cpreamtatnre 

* Full osknnsiaftan mrwca 

ASTON CORPORATE TRUSTS UD 
r ? -. Ctou ^ QS Isle of Man 

Tel 0*74 6?*59| Fa> 0674 625126 


| , OFFSHORE BANKS 

'mwdrrpre defcve^. US S15.0G0 up. 
j TeL 44 C?l 394 5157. 

j COMMERCIAL' BUHNE55 RNANCE 

« , » c , •t; P«iw 

Fax bnet ^wiapuj xi 

I 10 Ccrpmuft- Adtrstoto, 44- 

1 ou>»g-; ti 

; 2nd TRAVS DOCUMB4T5. Drain k- 
! wwi GM. 7 FenUcwn. Voukxriri 
' '*c7T fre-ce fai g*pg«52 

• HONG KONG CORP, S52S Annud : 
I r?s* S5W. 59 Ud ro:. 35 Cixwi'i U 
f-X Tei^;.^orSFe. £52-6433217 i 
! (ASHORE COMPANIES- 4Pa. 1*5 
! p/* £«£• Gowsta ide d Men. 
j lei i'XuJi cj-ii' ?.»• fC"x4‘ 

! SERMCED OFFICES I 


j YOUR OFFICE IN PARIS 

r» ready when you need &, 

r _ . *•*" For a uouple of ham. 

• • V-r+crpi m.joe-0 dhen 

vr caiterener roona rj rem bv (j* 

: ^-u*. c>. mcitfr. ex_ . 

- • ’ :<-• *i»:d e- permax:-;* hose 
j • i-er re mv.v All wrvrxs 

5S E • • • • 

j , 91. Fg S+Hanare 75008 PARIS 

| W f I ^.r<. fa , ,l|4Z6tl5efl 

; CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


FUNDS AVAILAB1E 
TO PURCHASE: 

I * l*xe-5 cl Gedii 
) * Giwsr.-eei 
i * Ct^er Atsestoiie C cfaten ! 

I • sacied 9. s-ngfo ’ms-'sn 

; thsu ma:os tun. banks 

1 CAPITAL SUPPORT CORP. 

‘ UJ. (7T4) 757-1070 Fax 757-1270 


FLATOTH. 

BFFB.TOW9 OR 
EXPO POCT5 DE VBISAUB 

From shxftos so fiw-room do tune. 
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free dwtda service to 
Euradisneyland 
Cat 05.345 345 ToB Fin 
or (33-1) 45 75 62 20 


AGENCE CHAMPS B.YSEE5 

ipeadsb n Fumahed apartmenb, 
readenftd areas, 3 months and not 

Tel: [I] 42 25 32 25 

fax (1) 45 63 37 09 


AT HOW IN PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

apartments to rent furnished gr no) 
Sds& Property Management Swvicm 
25 AvHodw 75008 ParcTfal -4561 1020 



L < 1 lr- 

P'J ; r 1 ?' 


PARIS AREA 


Uwiamtiiin.Ko 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGBIT IN PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 

PORTE MAlilOT. 160 fgjn. 
edge I6*i/17*. 6* IkxJtTbnght, ron- 
fertoble. HaB, lying, dang, 3 bad- 
roaaa, 2 batfn, fitted bkhen. bnidc- 


Td: (1 ) 45 63 25 60 sr-cumstvaevEW 


TOUR HOME If PARK 

INTER URBIS 

Luxury rentds & sdes 
31 roe de Mamau, Pans 75008 

Tefc (1J 45 63 ! 7 77 


AVE MONTAIGNE FAONG PLAZA 
ATHENS HOIH. fxgh dan apart- 
mert, nbaut 80 SOJn. entody newly 
r atone. F 20.000 dwrges & partang 
xiduded Tefc Owner 146 04 02 46. 

'TO BBir ■•••*• 

Hndpcfced Qut*y apartmente. d 
eaes. faro and tobwtB. CAP1TALE 
PAS7NE85 Tefc (1) 46 14 82 11. Fare 
111 <7 72 30 96. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

$AVE ON 
International 
Phone Calls 

Now you am cafHbo 
Jj. and w*i at much m 
65% enngtmnd to load phone 
Campania. SAVE UP TO SOS 
e 6 the moor Credit Card 
DIRECT Sxrnoe*. Pay ten 
that US. ixiyxiieeiy rdn 
an cafe originotina py yn i ai . 
Night aod w eefce nd aocuunt* apply. 

No gadget! ta buy. 

CM ham botob, homo or udiue. 
Itemized bffing. AB dgital. 

Cafl or Fax hr inform a tion. 

KALLBACKsm 

Tel: 1/206-284-8600 
Fax: 1/206-282-6666 

417 2nd Avenue Wert 
Saatte. Wa 98119 USA 

LONDON ADDRESS BOND STREET. 

Elegant offices & all services 
W. (44-71) 499 9172 Fat 499 7517 

BUSINESS TRAVEL 


Irt/ Buxtons Gam Frequew FroveSers i 
to Onert'Ausrnia ■ Africa tio & Sc 
Amenta Sow vp to 501, No con- I 
we. nc restnanra. bnpeml Corada 1 
_leN_S14jjl J2Z7 Fra 514.3e|.. , W8. , 

SECURTTV' AND 
SURVEILLANCE j 


3rd floor, 160 sam fcving. dnng. 3 
bedroona, 2 brths. h* equraed 
btchen. both, bdmnss. 2 pntanas. 
H 2,000 + dftvgn. Td 147 gOflT 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

WANTED: PARS, goad naghhorhood, 
3-bedroom epartment with study ana 
axrtytad far 4 adults end I dag. 

3 or 4 inwAi dartng eoxhr March. 
Tdephrme jQlfl 4729541 nr FAX: 
□10(476980 USA 

EMPLOYMENT 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

INGUSH TEAMS, Ungual, experi- 
enced. M-ftiue. Legal or Inra4 
knowledge preferred. Tels Cybnle 
Longue - fans PI 4Z89.1BJ6. 


PLANNING TO RUN 
A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily* contact your 
nearest IHT office or representative with your text. 
You will be informed of the cost immediately, and 
once payment is made your ad will appear within 
48 hours. AH major Credit Cards Accepted. 


EX BRITISH speed hvcei. expats ei 
Cfcne prcietnon, ftarxnq Uik A3 
npeds of vrartfy. Avaloblt iai 
contracts worldwide . icnluc! 
bitonahorxd Praedian Sennas Ud 
Tel44 /My7 9QJi fa.44 71 937 2579 

let. U8I4I MET G 


FRANS (HQ): Pont 

W III 46 37 93 B5. 

Fax (II 46 37 93 TO 
GERMANY. AU5IRIA & CENTRAL 
EUROPE FraJJun. 

Tel IOt'0 "*2 6’ St 
fa |l*9) 72 7310. 
BSGMM&UJXEMBOUtS Erwueh 
Tel 343 1899. 343 1914 
F«34W353 
GREECE &CYFRUS: Alhan. 

Id POII 6535246 
Fax. 054 5513 
DB4MARK: Cdpaifarpi, 

Td 31 42<»3 iT 
FNAMh Hefcnfa. 

Td 35d 10)647412 
Fax. 4121 1 12 
ITALY: f-L3rxio 
Td 58315738 
(tw 546 2573. 

NETHS9ANDS: Ajrafcrdrm 
Tel 6730757 
Fat 6737627 
NORWAY £ SWSXN: 

Bcrgai ttomav 

Td [471 55913070 
Fa. (47) 5£ 912071 
pmnuGAL- iisfaon. 

Td-3TI I 457-7293. 

Far 351 '1-457*7352 
SPAStModnd 
U.^087E9 
tar SSWISJ 
swirzaaANZPUy. 

Td '021)720 AI 21. 
Fcvtoiiiraajp) 

UNRED KB4GDOM: Undan. 
Iel.W T l|UJ6 4ail 
Fox |?7I| 240 2254. 


UWIH) STATES 

rCWYOIK 
Td: (212) 752-3890. 
F«c,(2l 21 7558785 
TUfcee 1900) 572-721 2 
Tic 427 175 

OKAGtt 

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Fm: (21 3)851-1508 
fcl freer (800) 8484739. 
TEXAS: Houston 

Td /Fat (7) 31 496-9603, 
ToB Fnu fcSOOf 526-7857 
TU 77082 


TORONTO: 

Tel: (905)8334200. 

Fac (9051 833-21 16 

MPOtEEAST 

UMIH) ARAB BWA3E5: Swidv, 
TeL- D6)351 133. 

Foe 3748888 

Tdac 68484 ITNGEF. 

AS1A/PAQHC 

HONG HONG: 

Td- (852) 9223-1 188 
Itx. 61170 HIM l 
Foe [852)9222 1190. 
SNGAKME: 

Dx.- 28749 HTSN. 

Foe (65) 224 1566. 

JAPAN: Tokyo, 
id: 3201 02 10 
Te J33673 fa 3201 0209 




You will find below a listing of job positions published last Thursday 
in fhe International Herald Tribune under the International Recruitment Heading 


pesanoM/iowLON 

PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR/ 

Geneva 

i 

\ :fjT£rirCA7:OK.U PERSONNEL 

g 

| TELECOMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERS/ 

Geneva 


COMPANY 

IATA (Internationa] AirTransport Assodation) 


World Leader in international Telecommunications 


SHORT COVER 


than usual. Volume rose to 53.98 
bilUoD Deutsche marks, boa 47.47 
billion the previous week. 

Hong Kong 

Share prices soared as overseas 
institutional investors flooded back 
to the market, particularly from the 
United States and Japan. 

The market rose 6.8 percent dur- 
ing the week with the key Hang 
Seng Index gaming 779.74 points 
to dose the week’s trading at 
12,157.57. Average daily volume 
was 1 1.033 billion Hong Kong dol- 
lars, up from the previous week’s 
9.162 billion dollars. 

Brokers believed foreign interest 
was in anticipation that niina 
would finally approve a financing 
package for Hong Kong’s mute- 
billion dollar airport project. 

London 

A sharp rise in shares m British 



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Aerospace and fresh hopes of a cut 
in British interest rates pushed the 
stock exchange's FT-SE 100 share 
index through the 3 ^00-point Icvd 
for the first time on Tbaisday. 

But expectations of an immin ent 
rise in U.S. interest rates — con- 
firmed on Friday -^- cut the gains 
and the index ended the week up 
jusi 28 points, at 3.447.4 points, a 
riseof 0.81 percent. 

Shares in British Aerospace 
climbed 13 1 pence to 575 after BAe 
announced me sale of its 80 percent 
holding in Rover to BMW. 

Milan 

Record higfas kept tumbling in 
Milan last week. 

The market's Comit index 
gained 4.05 percent, rising 420 
points to 10,782. 

Montedison dimbed 7 percent 
on rumors of stake-building. Fiat, 
despite a 1993 loss of L.8 trillion 
lire, managed to calm shareholder 
fears on the future and jumped 7 

percent over the week. 

Credito Ilaiiano, up 11.6 per- 
cent, and Ambroveneto, up 11.2 
percern, were in demand, helped by 
the successful privatization of EML 
The offer of a stake in the state- 
controlled bank was oversub- 
scribed and sold out in two days. 

Paris 

The Bourse remained at near- 
record levels even though German 
interest rate news dampened the 
market. But traders said the market 
was becoming impatient about 
continued high French rates and 
dismal employment levels. 

The GAC 40 index, after reach- 
ing a record high on Wednesday, 
ended at 2J29.I7, 16 poinis up, a 
0.69 percent rise. 


Singapore Honda Warns of Pullout From Rover 


. The stock market ended the 
week firmer after the United States 
lifted its trade embargo on^ Vietnam 
on -Thursday. 

The key indicator, the blue-chip 
Straits Times Industrials index, 
moved up 60.9 points, to 2366-97, 
a rise of 2.6 peroent 


Tokyo 


Share prices zoomed up as for- 
eign investors remained net buyers, 
bolstering a market swayed by do- 
mestic turmoil over political and 
tax reforms. 

The Nikkei average of 225 lead- 
ing issues fluctuated after soaring 
1,47124 points on Monday -fa the 
third largest daily gain: on record— 
to dose the week at .20,301.43 

points, up 83 percent. 

Foreign ' investors ' continued, to 
boy on prospects that thic Japanese 
stock market would catch up with 

booming bourses abroad. 

Sony gained 420 yen to 6,280 yam 
and. N£C 68 yea to 1,050 yen. 

Nomura Securities added .150 
yai to 2370 yen and Yamakhi Se- 
curities 89 yen to 889 yen. 

Zurich 

Foreign baying helped the Zu- 
rich market edge-up -last week. . 

The Swiss Performance Index 
broached the 2,000-poiht lewd to 
reach 2,004.74, a rise of 0.9 percent. 

- The market remained nervous, 
however, over the . Bundesbank's 
failure to cut key interest cates. 

Union Bank of Switzerland, ex- 
ported to announce good profit fig- 
ures on Feb. 25, gained 34 Swiss 
francs to 1313; Swiss Bank Corp. 
rose 13 to 525 and Credit Suisse 10 
to 751. 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


OTC Consolidated trading tar week 
ended Friday, Feb. 4. 

(Continued) 

Salas in Nat 

rate Hum Lew Close arae 


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If you won) lb receive a copy of the paper, piease contort: 

The Classified Dept, in Paris: Tel.: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 93 70 


0311% 10V* 10% + % 
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160-4% 4% 4% — % 

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1.16 47 
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1002 

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Kohlers R2I 21 
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LDDSs 

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Lunar 
Luna in! 


' LONDON (Rentas).— Honda Motor Co. may pull out of Rover 
Group if Rover loses its British status as a result of control by Bayeriscfce 
M'otaren Wodce AG, Honda’s chief executive said Sunday. 

Ttie executive, NobuMko Kawamoto, said on television that if Rover 
“becomes only ajont venture with BMW, and Rover thereby ceases lobe 
a British company, our cooperative relationship with Rover will not last 

)fonda has 20 percent of the car operations of Rover, which was sold by 
British Aerospace PLC to BMW for £800 mil Bon ($ 1.2 billion) last week. 

BMW's chairman, Berrid Pischetsrieder, asked what it would mean if 
Honda walked away, replied: “I think it would mean for Honda as wefl as 
fair Rover tremendous losses and I thlnk. it would be irresponsible to 
accept this.” But be said BMW wanted "Honda to stay and added, M I 
would obviously assure them as wdl that we-vriQ respect their interests.” 

GMHas Litde Profit to Share in U.S. 

- CHICAGO (Reutos) — Jack Smith, chief executive rtf General Mo-. 
tors Corp^ has said, that roost of the company’s U& workers will not 
receive profit sharing checks this year befcaose GW’s core North Ameri- 
can operations did not recover sufficiently in 1993. 

“I don’t want anyone declaring that we’re all fixed. We still have work 


; to do,” he said on Saturday at the Chicago Auto Slow. Analysts estimate 
CM’S North American auio opoatioos had a loss of more than $1 billion 
last year, after interest, taxes andspedai items. That was an improvement 
from a loss of $45bfflkn. hi'1992. 

IVbla^vitoEase Exdbatige Controls 

■- BLANTYRE, Malawi (AFP) — Malawi will dramatically ease ex- 
change controls, on Monday to stimulate growth and exports. Frauds 
Pereka Moyo, governor of the central bank, has said. 

Importers wffl jno longer have to appiy to the central bank for foreign, 
exchange approval, Mr. Moyo said, wHte regular exporters will be 
allowed to open, foreign-currency deno mina ted accounts with the bank. 

QbihnsMoimtm 

. ZURICH (Reuters) — Atag Ernst. & Young, a dminis trator of the 
bankrupt Omni Hddmg AG, says creditors have filed claims exceeding 
3.02 bunas Swiss francs (S2XK billkm) against the fugitive Swiss finan- 
cier, Werner Rey, according to media reports. 

In a letter to - creditors, the accounting firm said claims of S19 million 
francs had been rejected, while daims totaling 1.66 billion were put on 
hold due to insufficient information. Haims of 842 million francs against 
Mr. Rey have been accepted. ' 

The former bead of Omni is wanted for fraud had forgery. 


Salas In . . Not 

100s High Law CIqm area 


Sates to Nat - 

ISOs High Low Close area 


Sates to - Nat 

100s High Low Close afge 


7% 7% + Ml 
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14 14V*— IV* 


231*— IV* 

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7% 6ft* 7ft* + S Mohawk* 
5 5 5 — ft* MolecDV 

14V, 131* 13% + % Mofex S 
4% 4% 4ft*— ft* MolexA 
10 10 —1 MOftenM 

24% 251* + ft* Moments 
17% 1B% + ft* ManacnC 
5ft* 8ft*— t* MonacoP 
301* 30% — Vt ManacWt 
25% 25% — « MatlAvl 
16% 16ft*— ft* Mon Cam 

S 7 +1 Mondavi 
lh- ft* MoncvSt 
17% IB — % ManRE 
12 129*— % MonroM 

33 33V*— % MonlPao 

14ft* 14% -2 MOOTBP 


Modtee 1024 2V* 1ft* 1ft*— v* 

Mohawks 3927341* 30ft* 311* + % 

MoIbcDv 757614% 1H* 11%— 7% 

Mofexs £4 .1 399438V* 37 37 - V* 

MolexA .03 .1 543936V* 35% 35V*— 1 . 

MOdcnM 979430% 241* 28% +3V* 

MomenCo 296 Bftk I B% + V, 

MonocoC 1192 iSftu 12% 12%- ft* 

Monaco >= 2475 7% 0V* B*— ft* 

ManacWt 1«1 3>* TA 3%— ft*. 

30 29* 21* 2ft* — % 

Mon Cam 124612 II 11 

Mondavi 1118 9ft* 8% 9% + ft* 

MoncvSt 2t 10 5771 25V* 24% 25 - % 

ManRE JD 70 36 71* 7% 7v* — ft* 


14ft* 14% —2 MoorvP v .. 

7% 7ft*— ft* MorgnGe 02e 2 554 8% 

1SV* 15% — ft* MornGa .15 XI 8614 7V, 

33% 33% —IV* Moocom 04 5 TOM 8% 

341* 35ft* +1 Mostoe J6 1.1 123436 


119419% 18 18%—%' 

674619% 15V* 17 +lft* 



*■ I — ■ ■ 

MQitnorti • — 

ssiss M M 

Mk Twins .96 36 
MktFct 25 79 

Morast 

AtaraEI 

Maraam 

MrahSB AA 40 
MrstiSu AA U 
Marstll s 56 28 
Martek 
Marten. 

MortCol 

MdFdBc AB 2£ 
Mas tand- 05o 2 
Mason DtxlJffl 20 
Masshk 04 7A 


MaxErs 
Max co 
MaxcrHIl 
MoxlmGp 
MaxIGwt 


MaxiNBl Jtn SJ 
MayflCo 
Marti Grp 
MoynOI. 

MavsJ 
McAfee 
McCcny , 

Mean 

McCar At 2J 

McFBrt 

McGaw 

McGrth AO Xl 
MdbrkRe 
MechTc 
Medlmun 


341* lit* +1 Mostoe 
18% I8ft*— 9» Mottirwk 
7 rw— ft* Motcib 
8ft* 8% — ft* • MtnPkPn 
10ft* 11 + ft* MntoslaE 

/u. — - ■, MCotfee 

i^% iS* ^ MuetlerP 200 50 
JiS J2S u, MultOr 

S Fix ass- 

12V* KV*-1% ffljjgs; 

8ft4 0%—% jSS*n?" 

i . -aft*fafttr ■’ ' 

s'* 5 % + % r • 

20% HU*— 2ft* 1 . 

15% 161* +1% K-Vlrtilnt 


15% 14V* + fti, 
? 

7% 7% — ft* 

r- % 


92118% 17% 18 
30 21* 2ft* 2 1 
110214% 14 14 

2480 10 9 9 

446814% 13 13 

-O^ft* ^ ^ 
1874 191* 17V, 19 
630536% 34ft* 36 


MullAST 102t 4.4 14524V* 

MutSvaa stfiia 

112412 


17ft* 18 — % 
2V, 2V, 

14 14 — ft* 

9 V — ft*. 

'k sfcE-S 

17V* 19 +1 

34% 36 + Vi 

T T-& 
% ’J%- %: 


14V* 14% HAB AU 150*300 258 5% 5 S — 

25 26ft* +11* NACRO .16 S 548131% 39 30V*-*. 
41 41ft* + Vr MAI Tcs 5584 6% 5% 5>*— ft*. 


NBSC 22 X5 46771% 20ft* 21 - % 

NBTBCP 460 26 11318 17V* 17ft* + to 


41 41ft* + V* MAITc* 

9 9ft*- % NBSC 22 IS 

1% 2ft* + V* NBT Bcp .4ab 24 
15 15 — V* NCI Ms 

15 151* —4ft* NEC.. Ate 10 

MV: 11 +ftft NFORrtl 

n% iiv* + % NFS A0 2 A 

19V* 20% —1ft* NMR 

111* 12% + ftv NPMHI 

17 llfa NS- Bcp 32 1.1 
3«J 10 +% MSA In, 

2Sftw 25ft4— 1* NSC 1J0O2X2 
211* 22ft* + ft* NftTlEW 
44 45V* —IV, N Ytt. 

35% 35ft*— ft* Noham 
6ft* 6ft*— ft* NamTals 
11 11 — % Namle 

9% 9ft* Nanamt 

3ft* 3%— h, Nopco 
8V* 81* + ft* NatflF 22 4.1 

9% 9% — ft* Nattians 
11% 11% — lft* NBAtok UM 20 
19% Ufa— ft* NOIBcv 
41* 4ft* — 1* NClYB 1.14170 
48% 49 —2 NCJyfln JUb2A 


1611 18 ft* 16% 17 — % 
-46e 10 44149?* 47ft* 47ft* +2% 
64723 31V* 21ft* — 1% 

AO 2A 34817% 16% 16V*— % 
415 3ft* 2% 2%— % 
237 9V* 9 « — V, 

•32 1.1 2O0O29V* 281* 28ft* + V* 
344 6% 5V* 5V> 
1206280 30 4% 4 4% 

435 4% 3% 3?* 

2488 h % % 

280 4ft* 4% 4V* 
47711ft* 11 ll%— V* 
34711 10ft* 10% 

750 1% IV* + 

543 4ft* 4ft* 41* 

22 4.1 24310% 17V, 17ft* + M 

1313 8% 7% 8%— % 
100a 20 94 53 51 51 

11021% 15% 18ft* —2% 
1.14, 70 244017% 14% 14% +2% 
-88b 7-4 9736% 34% 34% 


48ft* 49 —2 NCJyfln -88b 2 A 9736% 34% 34% 

5ft* 4 + % NtCmBcS M ZB 45422% 20ft* 21% — ft* 

9% 9% NtCtfr J4 XB 163512% 12 12 — % 

10% Ufa— 1% NtCnvwf 503 7ft4 7 7 + % 

It 1,%-.% NHVCm, 1139120% 18% 19 +% 

5% 5% + V* NIDentex 95210 9% 9* + % 

6% *%— % NatGvns 1100739% 37ft* 38 — % 

9 9ft* + % NatGvwt 4054 25% 23% 23% — V* 


5% 5% + % NtDenlex 

6% 1% — % NatGvns 

9 9ft* + % NntGy wt 
52% S2%— lft* Nam me 
12 12% + ft* NMHH 

22% 23% + % Ntlinca 
5% 5% + % Nflln* 

15% 15% . NJMerc 
14ft* 15% —1 NtPam 
1% lft*— Nil PIC 
27* 3% NtPzn A 

12ft* 12% — % NIPWB 
5% 5ft* — % NollRV 
13ft* 14% + % Nat Reed 
35% 35% — 1% NtSanll 


93911 10% soft* + % 

„ 351 3 2% 2ft*— % 

20r 10 11117ft* 12% IZ%— % 
32 2-5 201 13 12 13 + ’to 

120 5% 4% 4% — % 

37 10 6940% 37ft* '38%- % 

*3610% 9ft* 9ft* 

804 7% 6% 6% - % 

424 6ft* 6 6% 

220412% It 11% — 1% 

473 5% 4% 5% + % 

-24 1.9 90 12% 12% 12ft* + % 

04 XI Z*6ft* 26ft* 24ft* + % 


12% — % 
S5VS— 7% 
8% — .% 
17ft* + % 
17% — % 


Medan wt 
Madox .14 j 
MnQvBklOOa XJ 
MedVsn 
MedCmo 
MBdAC 

JWndDv 

MsdDtOO 

MedGr 

Madlma 

MedMkt 

MedTwt 

MeoTecn 

MadSh AO 21 

Madid* 

MMflcwtB 

Medic wfC 

AMdlcus 

Mod levs 

■ n mlrnH 
ntCUTLXl 

Modstol 

Megcrd 

Megfood 

Nlegonrtz 

Mcpatesf 

Mefaml 

Mellon P 36 7J 
/AwnxTel 
Memtec 03* J 
MmtevJ 
ManWrs 

Mentor 

Mentor 

MrcBfcs M 3 A 

Mercer 

MneBirc 

MrchBo OTe A 
MOT BkNYI 60 3-0 
MercGns M 20 
Mardnl 

MndnBc 128 42 
MerMDta oob a 
Merd^ra 24b XI 

MorteL 

Madid 

Man Mil 

MertfCB M 0 

MeaaArs 

Mated 

Metotec 

MeHianx 

tfdMB .84 2 

MojtxlA 05 J 
Matron 

MetroFn 07r O 
MHfOCOJI 
MatroBcp 
MlomSb 

MW, IF 2D 22 
MkASfr 

MkhFn 1O0 X7 
MtetiNI ZOO X5 
MtcrBI 
MCTIftC 

MICFOOJ 

MieroHit 

ftlcrwor 

MUXAOS 

MloroPn, 

Ml CP no wt . 

Mkxctms 

Mlcre 

Mlcrdv 

Mkrofhi 

Mierefx 

Micro Ig 

Monica 

Mkrop 

Micron 

Micros 

MlcSctn 

Mlcrtot 
MtoKhSv 
MlOOcn ' 
MMAms AB AA 
MMArn UOOl 60 
mSaHs 

MdConn 44 34 
MMSOU5 28. X5 
MdBXWot105 5 2 
MKBFn 
MM0C& 

MlOwGr JO 10 

— — - m 

MiMHrae 

MHrBid 

MillrHr 52 17 


35% 35% —1»* NtSanll J24 1.9 9012% 12% 

13 13% + ft* ItSecm 04 XI Z*6ft* 26% -- 

5% 4V* — 4* NTeam 9886 7ft* 4% 4% + % 

lft* 19*— % NT tch J»e 10 784 3% 2% 3%- S 

10% 19 + % NatVjns 2438 7 5% 

31 31 —1 NTWI1L, 16747% 44% 


18% 19 + % NatVin 3 

31 31 —1 NtWIJLf 

39% 39% — 2ft* NtwdCI 
16 14ft* — % MatWndr 

2ft* 21* — V* NohirFd 
2% 2ft* + % NalrBt S 


2438 7 5% 6 — te 

14747% 44% 44ft*— 1 
1534217% 149* 16%+!% 
491 0 6% 7ft* + 1* 

79011% 10% 18% — % 
966821ft* 17ft* 18% —3% 


4% 4% + % HatrSun 20 15 46813% I2fti 13 — % 


6 6% + % NauttCO i 

ft* ft* + % Navarre 

269* 26** _ NavoGr 

3% 3V* — V* Nell cor 

8% 8ft*— % NeisnT 
21% 24 ■ +2% Neorx* 


Naaorobe 
% „ + Nsoorurt 

% Vfc + Neorun 
18% 19 Netframe 

3ft* 3ft* 3%— Netmang 
13 12ft* 17% + % Matrix 

16% 14% 15% + % HwftCmp 
2ft* 2V* 2ft* + ft* NtwfcG 
9 /% 7%— i Nwkime 

15 13ft* 14 — % Nwklmwt 


18% 15% 179* +2% NwklmotZOO 7A 29728 


849825% 23% 25 + ft* 

454 7% 4% 6?* 

15130% 2B% 28% —1 
83222BU. 26% 77 — ft* 
3 4455 24% 23 23 —1ft* 

90Z 8ft* 8ft* 8ft* — % 
2264 6ft* 6% 6ft*— % 

423 2 lft* lft* — Vi 
168 36% 34% 3* +7% 

T99ISTT 14% 14% —2ft* 
104933?* 32% 32% — 1% 
2177 7 6% 4% 

1862 7% i% 6% — % 
2069320?* 19% 20% +1% 
1514311ft* Ufa 1I% — ft* 
347 8ft* B% B%— % 


5 — V* NtWkSv 


13% 12ft* 13?fc + % Neuroc 
1«* 1% 1%— % Neuron 

TBfti 25% 27» +11* Nairtrg 33 IJ 

17ft* 15% 14 + % N BnmS 

13% >1% lift*— lft* HE Bus 00 40 

21 19ft* 19ft*— % NHmoTh ,4Sto 5J 

24ft* 20% 289* — ?* NawHn OBa .9 

14% 11% ll%— 1% Nwlmou 
22% 22 22 — % NJStl 

S3 52 53 + % NMHBc 

31% 29% 29% — 1* NwbNk S 


21712ft* 11% 11%— ft* 
750ft 9% Ifa 9% — V* 
174410% 8% 9%— ft* 

59 4% 4 4 — V, 

1244 7ft* 7 7ft*— % 

33 1J 447822% 21% 21% — 1% 
442 69* 6% 6ft* 

00 40 608?»% 19% 20 + ft* 

48a 5J 54 9% 9 9% + % 

OBi .9 28 10 9 9‘ — % 


797815% 13 ft* 137* — % 
540 14% 15% 15% — ft* 


52 53 + % NMJIBc 114 5% 4fti 4* — % 

- 29% 29%—% NwbNk s 5484048% 61ft* 62% —4ft* 

WV* 16ft* 169b— % N#weW6 20 15 119210% 9ft* 10% + ft* 

31% 29?* 30% + ft* NwMBfc .15e A 304M1* 34% 34%—% 

11 -9ft* 9ft*— % NwpkRs 7331101* 9Si 10% 

lift* til* 11%— % Newpt 04 J 143 5ft* 5% 5ft* + % 


. ,9ft* 9ft*— ft* NwpkRs 7331101* 9fti 10% 

lift* til* 11%—% Newpt 04 J 143 5ft* 5% 5ft* + % 

5 4%- 4% Nexaoen 1B71 lift* 11% 11% 

m Zft* 3 — % NextrfCm 3330742% 36% 37 — 4ft* 

ITftb 18% 18ft* + 1* NWlRa 111015V. 13ft* 14ft* + ft* 

4% 5% -SVk— ft* NcM 368 8% ft 8 

32% 30* 31% +1 NBBIIIyH .97, 7.9 . 786 13 H% 12% 

TVV* 17% li -J NWeDr 32379 9% 7% 8ft* +1% 

2% 2% 2* + % NHDrpf 125 47 53750 42 48% +4% 

15% 14te IS — ft* NoelGo lro9 rt* 7% 7ft* + ft* 

9 H 111 HolseCT 9113 7*% 2ft* 2ft*— 

17 17 17 — % Notontf 34 15 11717 15% 16%—% 

15ft* 14* 15 — V* Noonev 400 70 20 51* 5ft* 5ft*— V* 

24% 71 31% -1% Norma 327432 29V* 30% + ft* 

M* 8% B%— % Nordsn 54 .9 49740% 54% 59% +2% 

18 16% T6%— IK Nortfs, J4- 102967535% 34 J4% + v* 

14% 13% 131*— % Noretan 5RI19„ 17% 17%— % 

4% 3% 3%— % NABlo 48150 6% 4 6+2 

K9% 89b ?V* -fcV* NoANat 147MV* 14% 14% + % 

36% 31 341* +1% NAWatdl 92414% 13% 13%—% 

27 27' NoBnesns 107013% lj% 12%— % 

56 S6ft&.+ % NoStfoSV Afo 20 106028% 19% 19% + % 

Hft* 111*— ft* NSlarU 1174 5 4% 4% 

U% 13ft* + ft* NWTrttf JBS XI 679743 41% 42% + % 

15% 15% + % NOT T 51 of 112 55 61157% 56% 56ft* + ft* 

5% 5% - NarldCr 50a 15 16317% 16% !4Vi— S 

40% 41 -4 Nthrlm s 71 8% 7% a - % 

27 77% — 1 NWWCP .11 1J 67 7% 7 7% + % 


5% 5% 
40% 41 -4 
27 77% — 1 


4% 4ftfc— % ttttotrHI 
If* \%- % NvbIIII e 


*a=* 

5ft6 + % 


5% -6% — % NorWFn 3Se 1A 2Sn 11 
Ufa Ufa— % Norwood 142913 

2% 2 7%— % Novrnrx 1035 5 

5% 4% 4%-% Novell J. 9927022 

S B* 51*— % NovHB 923441 

7J, 8 +.% Woven 63081* 

27% 2S% 3bVf '+ a* Najmcg 26e 5816 

4% 4% 4% - N0HrZ3 5373 9 

85% 81% 81 Y- —3% Huyim 267 4 

6% 6 6%— V* NuVYS, 70633 2 

9% 8U 9%-% NuWtpf 17409 


1ms 71 0% 7% a — % 

EE, n ,J ^ V* 7 TV* + % 

NWEllllE 50 25 87 19% 1|% lf% + % 

NwNG IJ6 54) 131636% 35 35% — % 

Iptf 267 5 4V* 4% + % 

i'W __ 896212% 11% 12% +1 

9Fn JSe 3A 3541 11 18% Ufa 

wood 142913 12% 12%- v* 

nrx ,035 » 5ft* s%- % 

till. 9927022ft* 21% 2T%— % 

lus 923441% 38% 39 — % 

SI- “SS!?**. i«* i«%- % 

SCO J»« 58 14 15% 16 +lftS 

t rZ3 5373 9% jft* B**— % 

« 70633 2*W 1% 2 + ftL' 

3JS * „ ML.™ 


Micron iv 49313% T3ftb Ufa— % NilCMC, 30 U 17212% IP*. 11% +*£ 

MldOcn 549926% 35 26%+% No Cl SOI T4? 5% S 5%— fth 

MldAms AB AA 4571SV* 1^ MVb + ft* NuKolc A 330023 21 2lS-is* 


iars unt* numen XBJ023 21 21%— ti* 

30 79% 38 Notrrnox 19a 13 lV fij? 

5 SS HYCR* 11 30719% 18 11% +1% 

13 m* 13 + W Hvw 377 5% 4T* 5% I’S 

11% Wft* 11 = % NKOTA .16 Xd 540 4% 4 4% + 5 

23% M% 73% +2% — 

»% St I o 1 

28% 27% 27%— ft* 73-T r .., “f — ~ 1 

18 M% 17% +1% SSJF'Y 2544 15% 14% 15^ + i, 

.6% 6% 6% H 11* It* 1% X Vfc 

32% 3i% 31 % ~ 4 Comamed Faee n 


*S'B IS *?5STfe 


CotUamed <m Page 13 












L>* 


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'• - r" 



• * •' V; • ' : . V; rl ' 


N * 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUTE. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1994 


Page 13 


O N D A Y 



Recovered, 





GtrpkdbyDirSttffFmm Dapadm 

PHUKET, Thailand (AID ’ — 
Australia’s Grm Norman, too side 
to even Hft a dfub the day before 
competition began., won the John- 
nie Walker Gassicgolf tournament 
Sunday, beating Fred Couples by 
one stroke. 

Norman, who said he picked op 
a long infection while playing in 
the Dubai Classic last month, shot 
a course record 8-imder-par 64 in 
the third round and carded 68 on 
Sunday over the 7,049-yard, par-72 
Bine Canyon Country Gob course 
to a total of 277. 

. “Beware of a sick golfer,” Nor- 
man said. 

By edging Couples — who h e&d 
or shared the lead forthe first three 
rounds — Norman also moved up 
from No. 2 to take over Nick Fal- 
do’s position as the world’s No. 1 
golfer in the Sony rankings. Faldo, 
from South Africa, failed to make 
the cut Friday at the halfway point. 

Coupks shot 70 Sunday for a 
four-day total of 278. Bernhard 
i ang er also shot 70 and finished 
third, two strokes behind Norman. 

Ian Woosnam, tied with Couples 
for the lead after three rounds, shot 
73 to take fourth at 281. 

Nonnan said his future plans in- 

dudedmoie play in Europe. 

“I would like to play the Scottish 
Open because I have not played 
there," be said. “I am going to play 
five tournaments in Europe, 18 in 
the Stiles and one in Japan.” 

In Pebble Beach, California, the 
script has read like something out 
of Ponce de Leon's travel diary. 
You want die fountain of youth? 
Find 17-Mile Drive in Carmel and 
take the winding road up to The 
Lodge at Pebble Beach, 
first it was Arnold Palmer. 64, 

chamnginto the picture an Thurs- 
day wto a 69 ana then it was Tom 

Watson, 44. shooting the lights oat 
an Friday, and on Saturday it was 
Johnny Miller, 46. redhwvenng 

hb ganre and shootinga67 that put 

him just one stroke out of the lead 
going into the final round of the 
ATtfT Pebble Beach National Pro- 

^ yy\_ - - 

But a chMstfflledlhenL Dudley 

Hart, 25, shot 70 and stood at 10- 
usder 206, 1 

Miller and a 2 strokes ahead at 
Watson (AP,NTT) 



Once Again, South Bend JmxSuiksUCLA 

TL. *h n , * season-low with a victory in Stores. Connect!- fira victory m the Pac-10 this sea 


with a victory in Stoirs. Connect! 

cut. . , , 

Marshall, the Huskies leading 
scorer, was held to just three. free 
throws in the first half. He didn t 
make his first field goal until 14:47 
of the second half, ending a 0-for- 
12 drought. He finished wehh 6 for 
23 from the floor. 

No. 6 Arkansas 13L MontevaOo 


first victory in the Pac-10 this sea- 

S °Washingtoti (3-15, 1-9) broke a 
nine-game losing streak and a 12- 
eame skid in the league. Anzoaa 
(V7-4, 6-3) had a four-game win- 
ning streak broken. 

No. 13 Michigan 59, Midiigan 
St 51: In East La ns i n g. Michigan, 
Juwan Howard had 18 points and 
12 rebounds to lead undermanned 
Michig an to a victory. 

m LJ«uI Mir 


The Associated Press The Bruins shot a sea^low 

SgSUrtory at home gainst UK B 5 No. 6 Arkansas UI. M««a«o 

!§£?*.««-» 

coilegebasketbaIT SSSSm 

The last time the Brains ouneto ov ^°^nh^ lSm V , N. Car- uled mS ( 16-9). an NAIA Pat 

w VMSti! JKSSNinliCfr school in the summer afteragame 
ranked^ No. 2, but h** J° ratSm a and Jerry with Illinois fell through- The Fal- 

Dame 84-71 on Feb- 22, 1 Stackhouse helped hold off North cons’ worst previous defeat was 44 

J^iSJSfiiSSo." SSSSKid^*-**- £* by W State 
UCLA 71-IO.oaJm. 19, 1974. U s “^ c , lltoon i, te i ! .,. 

La mmwI fiw it, 9 TOW tO 


Kidd had 19 points, 11 assists 
and 7 rebounds for the Bears (14-4, 
7-2 Pac-IQL Lamond Murray, the 
Pac-IO’s leading scorer, had 26 
points and 12 rebounds for the 
Bears. The loss left Oregon at 6-12, 
2-7. 

No. 20 Missouri 104, Oklahoma 
94: Jevon Crudup had 25 points 
and 15 rebounds, and Mark Atkins 
mined Oklahoma with his 3-pornl 

vCnnuri remained mi- 


3: Scotty » ' Jg- “ 

®mts duirng an early 28-3 spree ^cmga^ Michigan (1*4, beaten in the Big Eight. 

- 7.2 Bia Ten) stay in a first-place ue Missoun <16-2. 7-0) overcame a 

roi .1 Fix BASKETBALL itdiana. Michigan State fell to seven-point second-half deficit to 

: I ! mi u foiimvine its worst often- win its fourth straight conterence 


m 


i riv wu • 

*1 Brums’ 88 ^“ 

wmmug SIr ? k ;. , a!, broia tic at 55. Stackhouse got 11 

The Irish used a tenacious man rfi»n 2-7i took a 55-53 lead 

to-man defense that wiped oat the h icremv Hyatt hit a short 
Brains’ flashy running game and whm Jerenw yan 

hddthmwthehlOT^mt ^ JU X 5 Conn^ticut 73, Miami 57: 

tal of , 1 ^. of S Marshall scored 20 points 


7UJ- „ „ 

No. 10 Temple 73, St- Bouaren- 
tore 52: In Philadelphia, Aaron 
McKie scored 22 points and Eddie 
Jones had 21 as Temple woo us 
10th straight victory. . 

The Owls (16-2, 9-1 Atlantic 10) 
look a 49-27 lead on a jumper by 
McKie with 16: 1 8 to play before Su 
n to in cmr«1 1(1 


rai vjiaiuuu w— — - r- 

stopped a critical Penn State fast 
break when he lost a contact lens, 
giving Indiana the victory m State 
College, Pennsylvania. 

Officials stopped play for Gra- 
ham with 3:52 left, interrupting a 
Penn State five-on-four drive that 
could have cut Indiana's lead to 
two. After Graham was set, Indi- 
ana (14-4, 7-2 in the Big Ten) 
forced a torn over and the Lions 
(10-8, 3-6) never came close again. 
No. 15 Syracuse 80, Pittsburgh 


McKie with 16: 18 to play betore sl no. k> ayracu^ 

Bonaventure (8-10, 2-6) scored 10 77: Adrian Autry scored^ ?»“*** 
straight points. including five baskets that halted 

Washington 74, No. 12 AAom Pimb^^^Symoseg^ 


raiwuii i 

seven-point second-half deficit to 
win its fourth straight conference 
road game. Oklahoma (12-6. 3-3) 
hung in against the Tigers despite 
just six points from Jeff Webster, 
who came in leading the league m 
scoring with 24.4 points per game. 

Georgia Tech 83, No. 21 Mary- 
land 71: James Forrest made two 
straight layups in a late 9-0 run that 
helped Georgia Tech, playing on 
the road, to snap a three-game los- 

“cSS Tech (12-8. >6 Atlantic 
Coast Conference) never iraued, 
mating its first seven shots to take 
a 16-5 lead. The Yellow Jackets led 
bv 10 at halftime but allowed 
Mar/land (12-6, 5-41 u> tie to 
score on a jumper by Joe Smith 
with four minutes left. 

Nol 22 Minnesota 79, Nortjmest- 


Greg Neman beat Fred Couples by 


one stroke in 


held them to their lowest point to- jumpcr^ai i^^^ vv&ngtoo 74, No. 12 Arizona putsburgh runs as Synmsa ffaoM with four minutes left 

tal of the season. Forced to fire 20 points 69: Maurice Woods and Jason its 10th win ra its last 15 road No. 22 Mmnesara79, 

away from long range most of the atari and Conn^toit Tyrus each scored 20 pomts as games. . em 65: Townsend Orr scored l 1 of 

second half, UCLA was 0-of-16 ^Calhoun Washington, al borne, won to its John Wallace added -3 oomts 14 points during a g&me-brcak- 

from 3-point range for the game, welamied back coacn Jim for the Orangemm (15-3 8-3 ™ Minnesota, playmg at 

^ East), who pushed Pitt (13-6. 7-4) thre^game Big 


InduTain to Skip Tour of Spain, 
Use Giro as Turnup to France 

■ ' Reuters 

concentrate on the GirodTtalia asa ^ 

de France, the coach <rf rite Banesto cycling team has said. 

• S5fc dedaou casts a doud over^ 

raMfiomns team’s oartkapatton m the Tour of Spam, with 

A» France winner does not ride, the team will be excluded. 
"The' Giro's' not Indurain's aim,” said Banesto s coach, 

T ^We^<^MVta- put a posable victory in the French race 
- tmdnpsin Chamboy, France, m 1989- ^ 

- •FredDeBrayne,63.ihek^B^gg*mto 

" 1950s, died Ftid^ in the south of Fiance, Belgian BRT 
radio reported Saturday. 


England Escapes Upset in Scotland 
As Wales Trumps Ireland in Ru^>y 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupadta far more unprKSlve than St /pwoiti**: ewnni MIR K3. 6U : drop 

EDINBURGH, Scotland - Full- ^ ^ ^^blT^ Ndl Jenkins 


JUUI1 ti oih**» v * « 

for the Orangemen (15-3. 8-3 Big 
East), who pushed Pitt (13-6, 7-4) 
into third place in the wnference. 

Ohio State 73, No. 16 Wisconsin 
57: Lawrence Funderburke and 
Tony Watson led a 13-0 ran to end 
the first half, then scored the first 
six points in a 12-2 second-half 
surge as Ohio Stale, playing at 
home, scored an upset. 

Derek Anderson led Ohio State 
(10-10, 3-6 Big Ten) with 17 pomts 

1 . ..a,; 1» Wiicnn had 


1 -- r , 7. I C..11 losses tO New zeaiana (Ji-u; oaol: Gregor Towtuend HR. . , lio-iu, " r-- . 

EDINBURGH, Scotland Full- w {jile the English no ^ Dublin, flyhalf Neil Je nkin s five assists, while Watson had 

back Jonathan Callard drove a J7- ^ ^ goCH i ^ their 15-9 vie- scored a try and kicked four penalties jg Funderburke 15 and Greg 

i^ovcr the M Blacks in November „ W a,es came from seven points Simpson 12. Midiael Fmley swred 
£? i 6 ”? “ft ta ffi suggested. down to win, 17-15. 18 and Tracy Webster 14 for Wis- 

Engjand a 15-14 Scot n0 doubt we made far too Ireland’s kicker, Enc Hwood, had 

land m a see-sawmg Five Nations ^ n^^es today." said En- a chance to give his team the victory 
rugby union clash. . .. gild’s thieved captain. WiD Carling, in the last few miautes, but struck the 

Some f wS hopes to lead his team to a third g^post with a penalty from only .0 

thought that Grego catur. Grand Slam in four years. meters. _ . . 

drop goal m M mirmte Satur u ™Jj dn , 1 ^ ^ played very well Mva a 29-6 victory over Scotland 

day hadjpvro the Srote wtoy- lifwcanpl a y that badly and to three weeks ago. the Welsh, who have 

But England for^an mfr^ ^ve gSt to look better for the ^ ^ decline for a decade, now 

ment.in a maul IndOJMJ bgg ^ a shot at the Grand gam. But 

MdS England plays Ireland on Feb 19, they stffl must pky^etwobest twins 
penalty of the game. He scored an & ^ 7 expeclei to be lb's in the competiuoa, France on Feb. 19 

En l^ rs i >< iSlLt Ibe onlv trv bv season’s showdown encounter, Eng- and then England. 

forward Rob Wamwright, ^ d ^ ranc JS^9 h M^d ^ Scoring: ^ 

-? a*™ !atkcdlw0 P“- JgSSsttZrStSS W 

aides. . . ^ J lies: Nail Jenkins Ot< ^ _ . 

The lead changed hands six times Scoring: .. ... (AP. AFP, Reuters) 

in ihc wilTlbe Scots looking 1 


ernoo: lowmoi-w.. ----- 
his 14 points dnrmg a game-hreax 
me nmas Minnesota, playing at 
STto snap a tbre^game Big 

Te R^OnS 1 had 18 poin^ and 
Airid McDonald added 16 for 
Minnesota (15-7, 54), . 

50 nercent from the field and tied a 
reason-low with ®gfat tubers. 
Northwestern (9-8. 0-8) lost ns 
eighth straight conference game. 

Utah SL 69, No. 23 New Mexico 
St 68: Freshman Jarobi Kemp 


annrauu - - 

18 md Tracy Webster 14 for Wis- 

llwasmeseconasuwftuiiw»‘« 
consm (144, 54). New Mexico Stale ( lfr-3, 8-2). Utah 

Na 17 Atabamajirmnigfama », Suie (g.n t 5-6) to't 19 straight free 
No. 25 Ondnaati 67: Robert Shan- ^ the second half, 

non scored 21 points and Alabama- 

n- : .L.o. nl.uino *1 home, UTi- 




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solos In NM 

l DOS High Um Close 01W 


No. 24 Florida 84, Mississippi 
State IS: In Gainesville, Florida, 
Dan Cross scored 26 and hit a 3- 
pointer for Florida. 

Cross’ 3-pomt shot wtA 1.06 
siave the Gators an 80-75 lrad. 
Horida( 18-3, 8-1) remained in fint 
place in the Eastern Division of the 
Southeastern Conference. Missis- 
sippi State (13-5, 6-3) led 46-41 at 
halftime, but Florida wenton a 10- 
2 ran to start the second half. 


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247318ft 16ft 17 -ft 
1514322ft 19 19ft-2to 
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182 Sto 
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20 w 17720ft 
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237 2*9 
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ZSeyn 
ZaltCA _ 
zaieCowt 

Zorina 

Zebra 

Zeauuik 

Zeal 

gmgs 

ZlonBCP 1.12 

ZHel 

Z*nued 

Zoirek 

ZoamTl 

zvead 

Zvuo 

Zyncula 


5918ft 
8975 9'* 
55 3ft 
46315ft 

1086348ft 
192041^. 
1145 Jto 
45Wl*to 
15< 2ft 
30 1312 SW- 
ill 3ft 
7369 37 ft 
3729 6*- 
3976 Hft 
8137 3ft 
454 Bft 
55S 4ft 


17ft 

8 '* 

Jft 

14ft 

4ift 


15 17 


ISto 7 ft 
Bft- ’• 
:»i— to 
is — ft 

45to— 2’- 


3to 

37W 
Jto _3to 
J4ft 
5to 
13ft 
lto 
7*, 

3to 


Jto- to 

34W 7 w 
2 - ft 

37to— ft 
3to— n. 
Mft— Ito 
6ft + ft 
13 7 to 

Pit « 
7to — to 
37,- to 





a** 




Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1994 




<P 



EASTERN CONE ERENC E 
AllantiC Division 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

New York 

32 1? 

37! 

— 

OrtarKta 

26 19 

J7B 

6V, 

Miami 

22 22 

JOt 

ID 

Hew Jersey 

:i 2? 

668 

low 

Boston 

10 26 

.435 

13 

Phi krtei Ohio 

1* 26 

422 

Ijv, 

Washington 

IS 29 

Central Division 

J4I 

17 

Atlanta 

32 12 

.777 

— 

Chicago 

* ? «2 

.727 

— 

Cleveland 

23 22 

Jll 

9W 

Charlotte 

22 21 

489 

low 

■ nctiana 

21 23 

477 

11 

Milwaukee 

13 33 

X3 

20 

Detroit 

10 35 

222 

72': 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 



W L 

PCI 

GB 

Housloft 

32 11 

J44 

— 

San Anion lb 

72 14 

496 

Ivs 

Utah 

30 16 

952 

T* 

Denver 

21 23 

477 

IIW 

Minnesota 

14 29 

J26 

18 

Dallas 

4 4) 

Pacific Division 

289 

29 

Seattle 

34 ID 

J73 

— 

Ptioeiil, 

» 14 

474 

4W 

Pori loud 

2* 19 

■57B 

8W 

Golden Slate 

24 10 

-558 

9ta 

LA. Clippers 

16 27 

272 

1ZV, 

LA. Lakers 

IS 23 

J49 

iew 

Sacra men lo 

13 11 

2*5 

21 


New Jersey H V tt 31—1*7 

Detroit 30 27 U »—l®* 

NJ: Coleman 9-17 1M4 31. KAnderson 4-22 
12-1429; D: Du mars 12-23 15-1*42, Hunlrr 6-16 

S-4 15. Rebounds— New rtcsev in (Colemon 
18), Detroit 53 IG-Anderson 12). Assist*— New 
Jersey 1 6 1 KLAnderam 4), Detroit 1* (Thomcx 
Hunter 41. 

PMtodCjpMa M 3B 18 24— W 

Miami 29 is V n-9* 

P; Perry M(HH,weiiiHer8iMn5-iiw 13: 

M: Shaw 13-Z2 M 27. SmlTti *-18 2-2 21. Ro- 
boands— I Philadelphia 45 (Perry |j. Miami 59 
(Seiklav 13). Assists— PWKxWPhK 20 (Bor. 
res 5). Miami 23 (Shan 91. 

Pomona » 28 2B 21—114 

Utah 27 M 37 38-128 

P: Slrlctiana 9-177-11 25, Bryant 5-9 7-6 17; 
U: KJWalane ll-l* 8-13 30, JMalone 7-11 6-6 20. 
Humotirtc s ll-M 0-0 25 Rebounds— Portland 
51 | Williams Bli Utah 44 iKMolone 9). AS- 
sls»— Portland 21 (Strickland Si. Uiah 37 
(Stockton 171. 

Seattle 21 24 35 !M1I 

MlhHWkee 13 38 M 27-94 

5: Kemp 5-4 7-11 17. Sctiremof 80 2-3 18; M: 
Brlcko-jvslfl 7-10 10-12 34, Mur dad. 6-12 4-6 20. 
Rebounds— Seattle 52 (Kemp *). Milwaukee 
43 (Bridiopwjkl 7). Assists- Seattle 31 I Pay- 
lon 10). Milwaukee 72 (Norman S). 
Sacramento 31 29 28 22— HO 

LA Clipper* 33 29 35 29—122 

S: Tisdale 10-181-321. Richmond 11-277-830, 
Webb 10-19 1-2 22; LA: Mannlna 13-17 3-4 27, 
Harper 9-25 4-5 24. Rebaeodi— Sacramento S3 
(Tfcsdalell). Los An<jeles 54 (Harper 10). As- 
sists— Sacramento 29 rwebe 8j, Los Anorles 
30 I Horner 10). 


Major College Scores 


FRIDAYS RESULTS 

501 Antonio 34 28 M 14-100 

Boston 34 14 34 21—91 

S: EIIIS 6-13 6-819, Robinson 15-23 4-4 34 : B: 
Brown 10-17 2-3 24 McDaniel 4-9 7-9 IX Re- 
boaiMs— San Aniento 57 ( Hodman 131. Boston 
34 (Parlsn 9). Assists— San Antonio 27 (Del 
Negro 121. Boston » (Fos. Brown 6). 
Washlnotaa 23 33 35 21-102 

Pfltfocfelptlta 29 22 29 31—45 

W: Gu«Uotla9 166-424.AdamsH33-4 30.P: 

Weathtrspaon 12-15 5-5 2«, Homace* 8-tfl 4-7 
23. Rebounds— Washington 63 (Walker. Murit- 
san ru. Philadelphia 42 (Perry 9i. Assists— 
Washington 24 iCheanev 9|, pmladelcnla 21 
IHomocok 7). 

Milwaukee 30 25 36 19- M 

Orlando 30 25 » 2«— 93 

M: Brick owskl 9-183-321. Murdock 6-11 74 
19; G : O'Neal 14-19 1-8 29. Hardawov 1 1-21 5-5 
28. Rebounds— Milwaukee 55 I Baker, Brick- 
owskl 9), Or kuido SB IHankrway 13). Assists— 

Milwaukee 19 (Murdock 6), Orlando 21 
(Haraanav 7). 

Miami 29 32 37 25-124 

Charlotte 29 27 34 88-118 

M: Seikalv 5-7 1 1-1621. Smith 9-15 0-7 26; C: 
E Johnson 8)4 6-7 26. Gattlson 4-10 1810 18. 
Rebounds— Miami Si (Seikalv id. Charlotte 

47 (wingofe 7). Assists— Miami a ( Show )0). 
Charlotte 37 I Bogun 12). 

Minnesota 32 19 23 19-93 

Indiana 34 26 37 2S-1I4 

M- Rider 1l-24 3-3 27,M.WHllums5-8 74) 17; 
J: Smlts 814 J-3 21. Miller 89 56 19. Re- 
bounds — Minnesota 42 i Rider B). Indiana 44 
(A. Davis 111. Assists— Minnesota 22 (M.WII- 
Itams 7), Indiana 29 (Fleming 7). 

New York 21 27 21 33-102 

Atlanta 31 25 a 30—114 

NY: Ewing 18278535, Starks 814 2-520; A: 
WiikJns 1822 1810 34, Willis 1821 8725. Blay- 
lock 8152-322. Rebounds— New York 53 (Ew- 
ing 16), Atlanta 58 (Willis 141. Assists-New 
York 25 (Starks I). Atlanta 25 (Stoytock (31. 
Seattle 26 M 31 21—108 

Detroit 19 a 34 13-84 

S: Kemp 814 3-4 15, Olll 815 80 18; D: 
Houston 818 84 15, Dumors 1831 810 30. Re- 
bounds— Seattle 56 (Kemp 1 tl.Detrol r 48 (An- 
derson, Jones 10). Assists— Seattle 31 (Pavton 
9), Detroit 17 (Hunter 51. 

LA Lakers 25 24 29 17-95 

Dallas 32 SI 27 17—87 

LA: Lvndh 1819 87 38 E-Campbell 815 3-3 
19: D: MasbCum 1817 1-322. DJmlttl 5-10 4-4 
14. Rebounds— LA Lakers M iDtvoC 191. Dal- 
las 47 IMashbum 1 1 ). Assists— LA Lakers 20 
(Olvac 7); Dallas 22 (Lever 5>. 

Chicago 27 25 29 38-191 

Garten Slate 23 29 23 18-99 

C: Grant 82! 811 24, Plpoen 814 1 1-1430; G ; 
Owens 817 86 31. Sore well 815 7-0 18 Re- 
bound* — Chicago 51 (Grant TO. Golden State 

48 (Owens II). Asoisls— Chicago 32 (PlPPen 
51. Golden Slate 33 (Sorewet! 10). 

Denver 21 34 22 28- JW 

Sacramento 17 17 23 26—83 

D: EUls 87 7-8 19. Abdul-Roui 4-9 88 16; S: 
Richmond 4-14 84 11 Smith 7-10 81 14. Ro- 
booeds— Denver 64 | Ellis 12). Sacra men to S2 
(Tisdale 10). Assists— Denver 18 (Pock. Rog- 
ers 41. Sacramento IB (W.WIllloms 4). 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
Charlotte 21 26 27 28—192 

Indiana 21 29 25 28-til 

C; E Johnson P-ii 3-4 3, Hawkins 7-13 2-3 
IS; I: Smlts 1816 4-5 24. Miller 9-11 80 2). 
Rebound*— Charlotte 43 1 Gattlson B). Indiana 
47 (Mitchell 'mils E). Assists— Charlotte 23 
(Bosun ID, Indiana 33 I Me Key 1C). 
Atlanta 22 a 3 21—93 

Cleveland 29 28 73 29-109 

A: D.WUkin581eB621,Bkrrbck ty-130-0 i!;C; 
Nonce 814 80 11 Williams 7-13 85 19. Re- 
bounds— Atlanta M (Willis 71. Cleveland 54 
(Nance 13). Assists— Atlanta 24 l Blaylock. 
EWo. wnstlev. Keefe 4 ), Cleveland 29 (Price I3j. 


FRIDAY'S RESUILT5 
Dartmouth 61 Brown 55 
Penn 67, Columbia 55 
Prince Ion 74, Cornell 40 
Yale 62, Harvard 57 
Butler 01 Deirall Mercy 63 
Boise Si. 67. E. Washington 51 
Idaho 92. Idaho St. 89. SOT 
Loyola Marvmoun! 82, GonzngQ 80 
Penaerdlne 77. Portland 64 
Son Francisco 75. 51. Mary’s, Cal. 73 
Sonic Clara 63. San Diego 61 
Weber 5t. TV, N. Arizona 71 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Canlshii 71, Manhattan 67 

Colgate 76. Lafayette 72 

Connecticut 73, Miami 57 

Dartmouth 76. Yale 45 

Dresel 74, Delaware *7 

Fordham 81, Bucknell 76 

George Washington 78. St. Joseph's 65 

Georgetown 71. Scion Hall 5T 

Harvard 46. Brown 61 

Hotstra 84. Cert. Cannecllcut SI. 76 

Holv Crass 91. Army 74 

Indiana 76. Perm St. 66 

Liberty 71 MH-Ba!tlmore County 64 

Loyola. Md. 70, Niagara 62 

Mount Si. Marvl. Md. 78 St. Fronds. NY 62 

N.C-wilmlngtan 70, American u. 60 

New B4, Lehigh 7V 

New Hampshire 65. Maine 64 

Northeastern 81 Boston U. a 

Penn 70. Cornell 5* 

Princeton TO Columbia 46 
Rider ICO. Long Island U. 79 
Robert Morris 76. Marls! 62 
Siena 01. Fairtleld 64 

SI. Fronds. Pa. 7a Falrlelgii Dickinson 63 
St. John's 71 Providence 69 
SL Peter's 64. Iona 67 
Syracuse 80. Pittsburgh 77 
Temple 71 St. Bonaventure 52 
Tawsan St. 73. Radford 63 
Vermont ea Hartford *8 
Vlllanova n. Boston Colleae 86, OT 
Wagner 77, Monmouth. N J. 57 
Wake Forest 71 Rhode Island 59 
Xavier, Ohio 71 La Salle 66 
SOUTH 

Ala.-BIrmlngham 81 Cincinnati 67 
Alabama 78. Georgia 77 
Alcorn St. 91 Grom Wing St. 11 
Auburn 91, Florida Atlantic TO 
Audio Peav 79, Tenn.-Martin 64 
Bethune-Caakman 68, Florida A&M 67, OT 
Cent. Florida 80. Samtord 7C 
Centenary 77. Fla. IntemallmuM 70 
Charleston Southern 81, N.c-Ashevllltr56 
Coastal Carolina 99, Wlnthrop 76 
Colt Of Charleston 82, Morcer‘51 
Copoln SI. 79. Howard U. 62 
Davidson 81 Georgia Southern 71 
Duke 71 Clemsan 74 
East Carolina 83. George Mown 75 
Flcrtda 84, Mississippi St. 75 
Furman 71, Citadel 63 
Georgia SI. 80. Stelson 61 
Georgia Tech 83, Maryland 71 
Jacksonville 88. Ark.-Llttle Rock 86 
LSU 84. Tennessee 83 
Marshall 71 VMI 64 
AML-E. Shore 76, S, Carolina St, 60 
Mississippi 61 South Carolina 62 
Murray St. 86. E. Kentucky 82 
N. Carolina A&T n. Delaware St. 64 
N.C Choriotle 76, Tulone 71 
Nc Louisiana 82. Sam Houston SI. 45 
NW Louisiana 83. Siephen F.Austin 80 
North Carolina 77, N. Carolina 51. 64 
Old Dominion 97, James Madison 81 
Richmond 101 William 1 Mary 73 
Southern Miss. S'. Virginia Tech 55 
Southern U. 102, Miss. Valter St. 76 
Tennessee St. 02. Middle Term. $8 
Trv -Chattanooga 86. E. Tennessee St. 84 
w. Carolina 74. Appalachian St. 69 
W. Kentucky 71 SW Louisiana 62 


MIDWEST 

Akron 49. W. Michigan 40 
Ball St. 84. Cant. Mlctl loan 58 
Bradley 69. Tulsa 64 
Cleveland SI. 97, Wls.-Miiwaukee 75 
Creighton 51 Wichita St. 55 
Drake 74. Indiana St. 70 
lii.-Chicago 80. E. Illinois 78 
Kent 66. Bawling Green 64 
Marauetle 75, West Virginia 50 
Memphis SL M. Davton 7» 

Michigan 59. Michigan St. 51 
Minnesota 79. Northwestern 65 
Mor Kansas City 86, me Illinois 85 
Morehead St. 91 SE Missouri 80 
N. Illinois 69. Valparaiso 63 
N. Iowa 82. Illinois St. 79 
Notre Dame 79. UCLA A3 
Ohio St. 71 Wisconsin 57 
Ohio U. 77, Miami. Ohio 63 
SW Missouri St. 61 S. Illinois 64 
Toledo 84. E. Michigan 73 
wls. -Green Bov 6*. Youngstown Si. 58 
Wrlghl St. 87, W. Illinois 73 
SOUTHWEST 

Alabama Si. 89, Prairie view 85 
Arkansas 131. Monfevalia 63 
Arkansas St. 52. Lamar SO 
Houston 69, Rice 67 
Missouri KM. Oklahoma «4 
Nlcholls St. 106. Texas -Arlington 8* 

North Texas £1 McNeese St. 47 
Oklahoma St. 19, lawa si. 66 
SW Texas St. 7V. Texas- San Antonio 62 
South Alabama 95, Texas-Pon American 7B 
Texas 95. Texas Christian 73 
Texas A&M 89. Texas Tech SB 
Texas Southern 80. Jackson St. 73 
FAR WEST 
Boise SL 67. Idaho 6* 

Brigham Young TO Colorado St. 70 

C& Northrldoe 84. Sacramento SI. 67 

California 81. Oregon 61 

Colorado 67. Kansas SI. 61 

Fresno SL 81 Hawaii 82 

Gonzaoo 70. Petmerdlne 48 

Idaho SL 72. E. Washington 69. OT 

Loyola Marymounl 91, Portl an d 7* 

Monlona 51. 81 Montana 79 

Nevada 93. UNLV 88 

New svtoxlco B0. Texas- El Paso 71 OT 

Pacific 81 UC Irvine 79 

X Utah 95. Trov Sf. 69 

San Diego SI, 82, Air Force » 

San Francisco 71, Santa Clara 69 
Sen Jose Si. 84, Cal SL Fullerton 82 
SI. Mary's. Cal. TO San Diego 73 
Stanford 71. Oregon St. 67 
UC Santa Barbara 67. Long Beach St. 66 
Utah SI. 69. New Mexico SI. 68 
Washington 74. Arizona 69 
Washington St. 73. Arizona St. 70 
wvamlng 6a Utah 55 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



W 

L 

T Pis GF GA 

N.Y. Rangers 

34 

13 

4 

72 

189 

132 

New Jersey 

29 

17 

6 

64 

189 

145 

Florida 

22 

19 

H) 

54 

147 

140 

Washington 

24 

25 

4 

52 

169 

166 

Philadelphia 

24 

76 

3 

51 

187 

198 

N.Y. Islanders 19 

25 

i 

44 

172 

175 

Tampa Bay 

19 

28 

6 

44 

137 

161 

Northeast 

Oivisioa 




Pittsburgh 

36 

15 

It 

63 

191 

182 

Man (real 

It 

19 

8 

62 

177 

153 

Boston 

36 

17 

9 

61 

170 

149 

Buffalo 

25 

22 

S 

55 

173 

Ml 

Quebec 

21 

27 

5 

47 

174 

1B5 

Hartford 

18 

30 

6 

42 

154 

186 

Ottawa 

9 

40 

7 

25 

Ml 

2B 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 




Central Division 





W 

L 

T Ph GF GA 

Taranto 

28 

15 

11 

67 

134 

153 

Detroit 

30 

17 

5 

65 

231 

179 

Dallas 

28 

19 

7 

63 

191 

172 

St. Louis 

27 

19 

8 

62 

172 

176 

Chicago 

24 

21 

6 

54 

153 

145 

Winnipeg 

17 

30 

7 

41 

159 

215 


Pacific Division 




Caiaary 

26 

19 

9 

61 

199 

170 

Vancouver 

2* 

24 

2 

54 

177 

171 

Anaheim 

21 

30 

4 

46 

152 

109 

Sim Jose. 

17 

24 

11 

65 

Ml 

168 

Los Angeles 

19 

27 

6 

44 

195 

207 

'Edmonton 

14 

32 

8 

36' 

'765 

196 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

Ottawa » 0 3—2 

New Jersey 2 2 1—5 

First Period: NJ.-MHlen 14 t Stevens. Mc- 
Kay): NJ--ZelepuUn 19 (Dcnevka Semak). 
Second Period: NJ.-HanWnsan 1 UMcKav.Al- 
belln) ; N J.-Drlver 6 (Stevens, Lemleux) (dp). 
Third Period: o- Yashin 22 (Louer. Ruzickol; 
O-McBain 6 (OrigteTurgeon) (pp); NJ^Zete- 
pukln a (Guerin). Shots on gaol: O: (on Ter- 
reri) 4-89 — 21 NJ: (on BllUngton] 14-17-8-39. 
Buffalo 3 3 1:7 

Florida ■ 1 1:2 

First Period: B-Smehllk 12 (Plonte, May); 
B- Sweeney 8 (Wood) (shl; B-Wood 11 

(Sweeney. Muni). Second Period; B-Phontol7 
(Hawcrchuk, Bodge r) (ppj; B-Presler 3 
(Khmyiev) (pp); F-flenntno 4 (Skrudiand. 
Hud); B-Audotte 14 (Plmie). Third Portad: B- 
Wood T2 (Sutton); F-Follgrei 3 (Smith, 

Banws). Shots an goal: 8 (on Fitzpatrick. Red- 
dick) 13-lHi— 34- F (on Hasakl 8-13-1S-33. 
Pittsburgh I 2 J-4 

Detroit 2 8 1-3 

First Period: D-Shepnard 36 (Yarman); P- 
U. Samuolsaon 3 (Sh*4eton); D-Fcdarev 31 
(Coffey). Second Period: P-Fronds 19 (Jagr. 


A*ultenl;P-Strakfl Ml Brawn. PaoW.TMrdPe. 
Had: P-Stralui21 IMcSortey. Brawn); PWtullgr 
30, (Toeehet); p Mullen 31 ismdca Tocchet): 
D-KocfeYfe Shots on Boof; P Ian Osgood) 13-11- 
14—37. □ ton Bui i uH Ol 8-12-13— 33. 

Montreal 12 1—4 

Wo eW ogton > 8 0— * 

Flrsf Period: M-Mwilor 1! (Dionne). Second 
Period: M-Oamphousc 21 1 Bettow*. Carban- 
neou) (apt: M-Damenauase 22 (LcCioIr). 
Third period: M-Oampnousst 33 (Bellows. 
LeCtolrj. snots 00 goal: M (on Tamraccl) M* 
B— 20. W (on ROY) 12-5-7—24. 

H ur t f ort 8 110-2 

Winnipeg 118 0-2 

First Period: W-Sloon 14 CShoraxm, 

Me Bean > (pel . SMand Period ; W-S marsona 
IGIRten): H-Cunncvwartti 9 1 Janssens, Ctri- 
birevt. Third Period: H-Sandenan 31 (Pat- 
rick. ZotaPSkl). shots on goal: H (an OWelll) 

6- T0-S-2— Z3. W (an Burke f 15*9-3—35. 

Chlaiga ! 1 1—1 

Eaenenton 0 1 0—1 

First Period: C -Suiter 6 (Noonan. Smith). 
Second Period: C- Poulin 9 (Noonan, Roan- 
fck); E-welgw n (Rice. Beers) lop). Third 
Period : C -Sutler 7 (Murgnv. walnrlcti). SMts 
an goal: C (on Rontard) 16-12-9—37. E (on 
Balfour) 7-12-6—35. 

Vancouver 0 • 0—0 

Anaheim 2 8 1-2 

First Period: A-Van Allen 4 (Sacool lsh].-A- 
Semenov 1 )( Sweeney, Dauris). TWrt Period: 
A-Carhum 18 IBaik, Hill). Shots on goal: V(on 
Hebert) 10-9-3-22. A Ion Whitmore) 6-1SO-29. 

SATURDAY’S RESULTS 
PhUcntetpMa 0 ■ 0-8 

Boston I 2 1—1 

First Period: 8-Bovnw 15 KMn Jo 
noau). Second Period: B-DonofolS (Bourgue. 
Smollnskl) I DPI; B-Shimcef 4 (SmollnskL 
Roberts). Third Period: B-Bouraue 16 

(Oates). Shots on goal : P (on Casev) 4-7-7— 18. 
B Ian Roussel) &-19-18 — 45. 

N.Y. Islanders 1 1 1—2 

Quebec g 1 1-2 

First Period: nv -H ogue 24 (Thomas, 
KruPPl. Second Period: O- Sutter 9 IKo- 
msnsky, Basyan); NY-KamiraXy 1 (Ferrara. 
Flat lev I.Thlrd Period: NY-Green 14 O-Savaae 
3 (Young, Lesctiyshvn). Shots on goat: NY (an 
Flsell 7-9-7 -XL a (an McLennan) 12-7-14-32. 
Pfftsbargh 3 8 0-3 

New Jersey 2 0 5—9 

First Period: p-Murphy U MJ- Oiver 7 
(Semak. MocLean) (pa): P-Jaor 1* (U. So- 
muetssan. Montiv): P-Frcnds 2D (Mullen. 
Jagr); Nj.-MocLean a 1 Driver, Terreri) 
(pp). Third Period: NJ.-C Lemleux 72 
(Omake. Carpenter): NJ.-Nledermcver B 
(Guerin, Zefesxjkln); NJ.-C Lemleux 13 
lOaorske, Carpenter) ; NJ.-MacLoeoi 24 (Rich- 
er, Nledermmr) ; NJ.-Semt* 11 (Fetisov, Ze- 
lenukln) (pp). Shots on goal: P (onTerrorl) 12- 
4-6-22. NJ. (Ofl Barrasso) 15-12-13—40. 
Tampa Bay 1 § 2—2 

Washington « 2 8-6 

First Period: T -Chambers 6 (Bradley. 
Tucker) (pp); W-Bandra IS (Hunter, Cate): 
w-Bandra 16 (Ktirlstleti): W-Bondra 77 
(Hunter. Kftrfsrtdi) (pa); W-Bondra 18 
(Hunter, Hatcher). Second Period: W- 
Kononakfiirk 5 ( Burrldoe, Ridley) W-Bondra 
If (Anderson, Khristlch). TWrt Period: T- 
Coto 13 (Creighton, Kllma); 9. Tampa Bay 
Bureau 5 (Andersson, Beraevto). Sbots oo 
goal: T (an Beauore) 7-4-1 V— 22.W (on Puppo, 
JaMarakll 12-7-13—31 
Montreal l 1 2-4 

Ottawa 2 I 8—3 

First Period: 0-Levfns7tShaw. Mpiletfal; 
M-Sctuwlder la (Damahousse. Bellows) 
(pal: O-Yastiln 23 (Ruzlcka, Louer). Second 
Period: O-MeBahi 7 ITuroean. Shaw) (pp): 
M-LeCtalr 9 (Damphaussse, Bel knvs). Third 
Period: M-Odclcin 5 (Mu Her. Petrov); M- 
Dlonne 12 (LeCiair). Shots aa goal: M (an 
Bllllngton) 9-11-5—25.0 (on Kuntor) 7-B-7— 22. 
Detroit 2 2 8-4 

Toronto 1 2 8—3 

First Period: o Sheppard 37 (Fedorov. 
Yzermanl: D-Shenpard M (Coffey. Yzer- 
manl (pa); T-Glimour 19 (Clark, Ettett) (pp). 
Second Period: D-Ctoasson 8 (Fedorov, Koz- 
lov) (pp); T-Barschevsky 9 (Andreychuk. El- 
iott) (pp); T-Gttmaur 20 (Oortc) (pp); D-Fe- 
dorov 36. Shots oa goal: D (an Potvtn) 13-18- 

7- 38. T (on Cheveldea) 1M3-12-37. 

San Jose 8 2 1-3 

St. Louts 1 0 1-4 

First Period: SL-S. Duchesne 3 (Brown. 
Janneyl (oa). Second Portad; SJ.-Noritsv4 
(OuMlnsh, Larionov) ; SJ.-Gaadrecu 9. TWrd 
Portad: 5J--Ellk 10 (Faiioan, Pederson); SL- 
Miller 19 (Jonnev, Sh an ahan); SL-Chase 2 
(Karatev, Prokhorov); SC-Prokhorov 5 (Kor- 
olev, Choso]. Shots an goal: 5_J. (on Hrivnak) 
10-14-7—31. S.L (an Irbe) M-8-10-32. 
Coloary 8 4 0 1—9 

Los Angeles 3 1 1 *-« 

First Period: i_A--Rvchel 7 (Huddv. Con- 
ocher); LA.-Rohllalllo 30 (ZMtnlk, Sydor) 

I pp). Second Period: C-Retchrf 23 (Maci nnts. 
Keomor); C- Roberto 22 (Wotz. K earner) 
(pp) ; C-Knne 2 { Fleurv, Ranheiml ; C-Wciz 7 
(RckheL Fleurv); LA.-Robltallto 31 
(Gretzky, Sandslrom) (pp). Third Period: 
LA. -Gref/kv 26 (pp!. Overtime: C-Maclnnli 
18 (Roberts, Nleuwendvk) (PP). Stats on 
SOB): C len Hrudey) 6-2)-13«3— 39 LA Ian 
Kidd) 134-12-:— 33. 


Grog Norman, Australia, 75-70-64-68—277 
Fred Couples Ui, 66-72-70-70— OT 
Bernhard Longer. Germany, 66-78-71 •70—279 
ion mm/xvn, wotes 60-72-68-73—781 
Mike Harwood, Australia. 71-7269-70—282 
Colin Montgomerie, Scotland, 7^72-71-70 — 283 
Hsiefi Chfn-iheng, Taiwan. 70-49-70-74— 2SU 
Frankie Minora, Ptilllppbies. 72-7*^7-71—284 
David Fenertv. N. Ireland, 6271-73-71—284 
Pierre Fittko, Sweden, 74-78-72-69— 2BS 
Isao AakL Japan. 70-71-71-73—285 
Sven struver, Germany, 77-786969 ZB5 


Davis Cup 


A5IA-DCEANIA ZONE 
Grow 1, Preflmkmrr Rapnd 
Japaq S. China 0: 5huzo Matsuoka and 
RyiaoTiuliimdof. Pan Bing and XlaJitaJng, 
6-2. 7-6 (7-5), 7-6. Shuzo Matsuaka del. Xta 
J taping 64. 64); rgsufuml Ygmampto def. 
Pan Bing. 6-L 7-5. 

Group 2, First Round 
Thailand 5, Sri UnM ■: Wltaya Samrel and 
Ttaakorn Srichopon, deL Jayondra Wlleve- 
sekera and SenakaKumara, 6^. 6-4.03; Nor- 
athom Srictwphan def. Rohon De Silva 6a 7- 
5; Varaptioi Thongkomdoi del Jcv unku 
Wiley eaekera, 64L 6-8. 

MalavSta Z Taiwan 3: Adam Malik and Ra- 
madiandran Rpmatah, Motoysla. del. Lien 
Yirtkii sid Chen Chih-lung. Taiwan, 6-4,34,6- 
1. 7S 17-47; Lten YuJluef tattL Rfl 


Ramatah 6-1, 7-5, 63; Chon Chm-vung def. 
Adam Bln Abdul Malik 7* Mu 6-L 
PokMon 4, Singapore 0: Muhammad Kha- 
Pa and Omer Rashid, def. Shannon Lim and 
LHr WW Yaw. 63. 7-6 (7-S), 63; Khaita def. 
Adrian Lom, 61 62; Rashid vs. Mark aiov - 
cancelled. 

Iran 2. Saadi Arabia 1: Romm RaztonU ran, 
deL Batb-MogaTyeLlaudl Arabia, 6-L 6A 6-4; 
Zulfloar Ahmad, Saudi Arabia, def. Muham- 
mad Rem TavotaiL Iran, 7-6 (7-S), 62, 7-S; 
KamtaEz Derafsbi Javan and Jahanbafcsh 
Sour I, deL Badr Mpgalyal and Dttanan M An- 
OZl. 67 (5-7), 61 61. 62 


EURO-AFRICAN ZONE 
Graop 1, Preliminary Rimed 
Zimbabwe 4, Luxembourg l: Wovne Block 
and Malcolm Birch, def. Adrien Gralmprnv 
md Patrick RemarfceL 6-4. 63, 63; Wovne 
Black def. Adrien Gralmarey, 64, U 62; 
ArrttRxrv Mills. Luxantaouro, dot. Gwfnyal 
Tongoona Zimbabwe. 61 7-S 


AMERICAN ZONE 
PreUmfncrv Round, Graop 1 

Peru X Mexico •: Jaime Ynma. Peru. def. 
'Luis Enrique Harero. Mexico, 1-4, 6-3, 60. 7-5; 
Jase Luis Noriega, def. Ollvar Fernanda,^ 
67 15-71, 6-a 6-3. 64; Jaime Yznga and jpm 
L uis Noriega def. Oliver r e ma nde i. and 
Jorge Lozano, 62 24, 7-6 (7J). 7-3. 

Uruguay % Caba 8: Marceia RHppInL def. 
Mono Tabarea.61, 4-4. 63,60; Otago Perez, 
def. Juan Pina 7-5. 6-1 61 ; Marceia Flllpplnl 
and Diego Perm, deL Juan Pino and Mario 
Taborex, 7-4 (1681. 62 62 

Group 2 Flrsf Round 

Canada X Jamaica 6 Sebastian Lareau, 
deL Doug Burke, 7-5, 62 64; Daniel Nestor, 
del. Kart Hale, 746X62; Setwsnen Lareau 
md Daniel Nestor, def. Doug Burke and Karl 
Hale. 61, 61. 61 

Colombia X Guatemala 8; Miguel Tatan. 
del. Daniel Chavez, 63.74.63; Mauriclo Ho- 
dod. def. Jocobo Chavez, 7-6 (7-3), 4-6,8X26, 6 
4: Maurlda Hadad and Miguel Toban, def. 
OunlelOxivezand Carloo Chavez. 3-66X64, 
4-6, 64. 

Venezuela 2 Paraguay 8: Jimmy Szv- 
manakOOcL R tou ri u Mia ia. 6X6X64; Nka- 
los Perelradot Ruben Arvarenga.7-x 6X63; 
NleakB Pereira orw Jimmy Szymarnky. del 
Ricardo Mena and Ruben AJvn n enga. 6-L 7-4 
(7-3). 61. 

Ecuador XFoorto Rico 8: Nlcatas LapenfL 
del. Jorge Genzgioz. 62 6X64; Pablo Cam- 
mma. def. Joey Rive. 6X64, 64; Nicolas Lo- 
pentl and Pablo C an ip ana. def. Joey Rive and 
Joswxi Front era, 66. 62 64. 67 (7-9) 6-1 

DUBAI OPEN 

Men Singles 
Seram nab 

Magnus Guslafssan (4), S wede n del Alex- 
ander Voikov (8). Russia 62 62; Sargl Bru- 
Ouora (It, Spain doL Wovne Femora (4), 
Soum Africa 62 6t. 

Final 

GustMssan, def. Bruguera. 6L 62 
SAM JOSE OPEN 
Men's Singles 
Semifinals 

Renzo FUrtan (6), Holy, dot. Richey Reno- 
bora (2), UA, 64,64; Michael Chang (1 1. U.S. 
daLKartmBraaicti IS), Germany, 7-X4-4.6X 



ette Tansbera. 

IX- Frtastaoer, ML 


SOCCER 


Oayl 


TIGHT FIT — U.S, speed Gutter Bomde Blair dn&raig Sunday 
to pufl a skate oo for a pre-Olympic workout in Hamer, Norway. 


DUTCH FIRST WVlSIWt 
Comaeur Leinrarden 1. Go Ahead Eagles Q 
WV Vania 1, FC Grartnuta 3 
PC utredu i, wmorn u Tittura l 
Rada X Korirtrade 1. SC WW«w 
FC Twonto Ensriiode.XFC Votantaro O 
Feronwrd Rottertwi 1 . NAC Br eda 1 
RKC WatvHIk X 5parta .Rottortom T 
Vllease Amtan L MW M omlit-M 3 
PSV Eindhoven 4, Atax Amrf-. man i 
StootBops: Ahw. 36 pu»nh^f=w»c»ra, M. 
PSV, 30; VlteSSD 2BJ MAC, 26; Rod ®J^'"‘ 

W9ttom)lorxIFCT>tta^23;M VVondy vy. 
3D; Sparta, GA Eattas, ata i tw^emlf, 

FC Utrecht. T7; FC Grartrewa M; FC Votan- 
aom. lit RKC W; Combuur. *- • 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Blackburn X Wimbledon 0 
EvoriM 4, Chelsea 2 
Mcmeflester City 2 iRswtch T 
-Honefcti 2 Uuarpoal 2 
Oklham 2 Southampton ) 

Queens POffcRpngoreXMonehestor Unttod 3 

Swindon X Coventry T 
TOttantam 2 Shetftefd Wednesday 3 
Aston Vflta 1. Locds.g 
Staodiaos: M ua chosser United, 67 potots; 
BtacfEbuni. 54; Arsenal, 46; Nenantta, *5i 
LhmrpaoL 44; ShePWd Wodnesdav and 
Leeds, 49/ Aston VUia. *>; Morwlrii, 40: 
GoofreFarit Raagtn, 39; west Hcm,35; Cov 
entry. 34; Wimblsdan. 33; Ipswich. 32; Evor- 
loiv3l Tottenham. V; Chelsea. 26; Manrttes- 
lor CHy and Southampton, 24.- Oldham, 23; 
Sheffield U rated and Swi ndon, 22 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Toutom# 0, Bordeaux Q. 

Mantes 2 LHto 8 
Lt Havre X MontPSlUer 0 
Saint -EHerme X ManeMts 0 
Cannes 1 Coen 0 
Parls-SG 1 Angers 0 
Lens 2 Metz 8 
Mari iauas X Lyon 1 
Auxerro 1. Sachoux 8 
Monaco 2 Strasbourg 1 
Bmnflsgs: Ports S-G„ 40 pafnt s; Morsdlta . 
35; Bordeaux,- lb Atmam and MonfpeWor, 
29; Nonte&a; Cixmeaiciiid Lvon.27; Monaco, 
26; SWnFEtkune, Lens and Strasbourg. 25; 
Soctomc.23: Mptz ana La Hovre. 2); Uta, 2W 
MartfaueoendCaeaHI; Toukxrae,)*; Angers. 
IX 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Cagliari 1. Foggto i 
Cramahese 2 Atotanta of. Boraama 0 
Internazlonato of Milan 1, Lazio of Romo 2 
Lecce 1, Pi a ce n z a T 
- Napoli 1, Genoa 1 

ReggtaiR 2 Juveniusaf Turin 8 . . 

Sampdartaaf GuaaX Utfnosc 2 
Torino 1, Parma 2 

aanfluos: MHan. 32 points; S a modorlaW; 
Juvsntusand Parma. 0; Lxala 27; Inter, 25; 
NopoU. 26; Torino, 23; Foggto and Cog! tart, 
21: Roma, Ptocenza and Cremone3a,X; lidhv 
eseand Reggfanaond Genoa I7;Alal£Dto,15; 


7. 


women's Doodles 
Final 

Para Shriver. ILS. and Elizabeth Smvtte, 
Australia (3), dot. Martina NavratHava, i.i.S, 
andManan Bollegraf, Netherlands (4)AX66. 
7-6 17-3). 


World Cup SkUng 


MARSEILLE OPEN 
Moms Stogies 
Semifinals 

Amaud Bacfsrti (S), France, def. Diego 
Nargtse, Italy, 76 (7-31.6-3; Marc Rassef (4), 
Swltzancmd, aef. Michael Stlcti (1 ). Germany. 


Johnnie Walker Classic 




Final roond scores of the 5980880 toonw- 
msnf piayad an the 7J49-yard, Por-72 Btoe 
Canyon Country Club la Phuket, That (and: 


62 26,64. 

Final 

Rosser (4), def. Bootsch (5), 76 (M), 76 (76). 
PAN-PACIFIC OPEN 
Women's stogies 
San Moots 

Sloffl Graf, Germany Hi, del Kristie Boo- 
aert. Netherlands. 62 62; Martina Ngvrotl- 
tawa, UJL (2), dot. Manueta Matasvg-Frag- 
ntare. Swllzeriand (6). 62 6X 
Float 

Graf. dot. NavratHava, 62 66. 


ME ITS SLALOM 

Rssotfs from Gin mliih risliiutin Ron 
Germany: 1, Alberto Tamba, Italy, l minute, 
3247 seconds (4595 seconds 66X2 seconds] ; 2 
Tomas Foote Sweden, 1 : 3X58 (4L676L91); 
X Jure Koslr. Slovenia, 1 :3421 (4731 6X90); 4 
Pater RaJh, Germaiy, 1 :34A1 (4K326439);X 
Armln Bittner, Germany, 1 :B4J3 (47A8673S); 
6 Bernhard Gatreta. Austria, 1:3439 (4769- 
47.10); 7, Lasse Ktus. Norway, 1;3487 (47J0- 
47 J7); 2 Thomas Svfcora, Austria, i:34JB 
(47J0-47JH); 9, Thomas Stanoasstncer, Aus- 
trta.1 :3490 (47JN67A6); IX FafartrioTesairi. 
Italy, 1:345B (48AMX41. 

Slalom Na n dlaw (otter • everts); 1, 
Tamba, 540 points; 2 5tangaaslnger. 4SU X 
Koslr. 421; 4, FliwChrlstlan Jagge. Norway, 
319; X Foote 352; X (tic) Svfcora ml 
Gstrela 268; x Peter Both, Ger man y . 348; 9, 
Kiettl-Andro Aamodt, Norway, 215; la Ota- 
amsttan Furusoth, Norway, 211. 

Overall sl owdl ag s (after 27 events); 1. Ao- 
modLVUU points; 2 Tamba, 746; XMara Gfr- 
ardelU.Luxombawra.747; 4 Guenther Mador, 
Austria, 720; & Klus, 410; X Koslr, 471; 7, 
Stonpasslnger, 452; X (tie) Jan-Ebiar Thor- 
son, Norway, and Gstreln, 436; IX Hannas 
TrinkL Austria, 42T. 


Stomflpas In Hw event: 1, SctWieMer. 668 
paints; 2 Wibera 5)0; XUrskaKravat, Slavo- 
nta. 310; 4 Gamzta, 286; & Marianne Ktaer- 
Stoa Norway. 212; X Ertf, 192; 7. P ulikta 
ChouveL FnxKu. 190; X von Gruertfgen, 1 W; 
9. Kristina Andersson, Sweden, 179; )X Aalto 
wacnter. Austria 178. 

WOMENS SUPER-© ' 

Results Sunday in Mi l 1 u Nevada. Spatort, 
Hlide Gere, G et marry. 1 mtoutx 47.80 sec- 
oads; 2 Isolde Kostner, itahr. 1 :4U0; XKath- 
artna Gutensohn. Germany, l:4fljni 4, war- 
wara Zetanskato. Russia. X HeMI 

Zurbriagen, Switzerland, 1:49j0ti XTilrike 

Stanggasstnger, Germanv, 1 ^9.14: 7. Regtat 
Cavaanoud. France. 1 :4922;X Peres. 1;4US; 
9. Megan GeretY. United States, 1:4926; KV 
Katta Setetaper. O ennqnv, IHW3X . 

S t a n din g s to the sveaf (after 4 races): L 
Katta SeMnger. Germany, ZH; X Petwa W) 
X Wlbere, 18X- X Ublks Motor, Austrhh UB; X 
Davzaa. 150; X HBds Gereu Germany. MO; 7. 
Katla Karen, Sloven hvUX'XIspide Katfner. 
Italy, 101; 9, Zurtrtggeh'M; TO Rmtwrino 
‘Gutensobto-Gdrinaify. 92r 

ovenaO World Cap stondton: X Vrenl 
Schneider, Switzerland, ifllB potato; 2, Per- 
nDta WIbenb Sweden, 1JD9; XAnlta WbtMor. 
Austria, 898; X OompagnanbTSZ; X Seizlngar, 
7to;XMotar,711;7.Ertt,592;XP*rez,5H;9, 
Ganux 505; TO Martamo Ktoerstad, Nor 
WOT, 434 


SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Reed Madrid X Deporttvo 0 
Raya Vallecono 2 LloMa 2 
Loarone* 1, Tenerife 2 
Vatoncta 1 Racing do Su nl andor 1 
OeHa XAttetksde Madrid 2 
Sporting de Oitan X Oviedo 0 
Sevilla X yanodbOd 3 
Real Soctadod V Qrauina a 
Albacete 2 Zaragoza 1 
. stamfleax: Deporttvo La Coruna, 32 paws; 
Baraelmta,- Sportfng da GMm and Am f 
Madrid, 27: Athletic do BUboa. 26; Ataoceta 
and Real Sodted, 24; Sevftto, Ovtedoi 23; 
Zaragoza Racing de Sanhnder, vatanctaasd 
Tepertfa 22; Attetlcnde Madrid. 29; Cetta IV; 
Laaranesand RoynVaflecana 18; VaftodoHd, 
16; LMda.14; Osasuna IX ' 


CRICKET 


THROB DAY MATCH 
Sri Loata vs. Peatab - 
Final Dm, Sotartat to Cta n fflaarh neW 
. Sri JjBida . 1st tunings: 341-7 
FynMi TNJUNWiasi J3«. ^ 

Sri Lanka tad tantngs: T87-5 . r ^> 
Pun tab tad bxitaas: BM- • v 

Match drawn. 




TRANSACTIONS 


SpeedSkatlng 


. TepflnlibareaataniarlaWorMSpegdSlut- 
taoOi omp ta niMpH orWOw eu ta BeffwMon- 


WDMEPTS SLALOM 

Results fnm the 497-metor 0641 toot) 
coarse In Sierra N evad a, Same: 1, Vrenl 
Schneider. 1 minute. 41 JO seconds; 2 PernUta 
Wtaera. Sw eden. 1 : 4266:1 Deborah Comaag- 
nani. Italy. l:4Z20; 4 Gabrleta Snore, Swit- 
zerland, 1:4196; X Moreno Galllzlo, Itahr. 
1:43JM; X Lotto Piccard, France. 1:4273; 7, 
Atafika Davzan, Stovonta, 1:4273; X BflHaao 
Perez. Italy. 1 AIM; 9, Christine von Gnieni- 
aen, swttmrhnL 1:41U; IX Marttna Ertt. 
Germany, i:43JX 


588 METERS 

I, Ulrtko Adetaera, Germany, 4UM soemdu 
2 Emere Hunyady, Austria, 4LBD: X Emeso 
Antal, Austria, 4U4; X Molni trMnoAJA. 
4U89; X Ingrid Llapa, Canada, 4232; X Ml- 
kaetaDoscalu.Rornankb4235;7,ChlhaniN6- 
zQhLJ a pBov42»;XCerasetaHordBbgnu,Rp- . 
mania,. 4248; 9, Barbara do Loot, 
Nottiortandki 4242; TO Narika Munoktax Ja- 
pan, 4242 

UR METERS 

1. Hunyady, 4:3059; 2 Adobara, 4:3071; X 
Dascaiu. 4U5241: 4 AUo Uehara Japan, 

4 :3253.x Anal Frtadnam, Germany, 434X7. 
4 Munefcata. 4 : 3498; 7, Uudmlto Prolcashava 


BASKETBALL 

National Be uk elb ta) Auedotlon 
NBA-Suspondod Randy White, Dottai for- 
ward, without pay for I gamo and lined him 
WM for thnwtag punches at Vtode olvac, 
LA. Lakers editor, in gome Fob, X 
FOOTBALL 


NEW DRLEWHS-Ooctared JoeL HBgon- 
bere, center , free agent by wtthdrawtog ids 
transition pfarer dostanattnn. 

HOCKEY 


NHL — Suspended Chris Cheflae. CMatao 
defenseman, 4 pome* wtthaul pay and Hood 
him *500 tor , eye-scratching toddonf wttti 
Dana Murzvn, Vancouver dehnsemai, in 
game Feb. 2 

. HEWJER5EY-SoitJoniriavModrY.de- 
ferapman, to Albany, AHL. 

5T. LOUIS — Recalled Dave Mackey, for- 
ward. from Peoria, IHI_ 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANLITS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


WU. NtXER SET AHEAD W 
LUNG AROUND, HQU KNOW 


n *» HE ] 

Vraciws? J 

OWnOSLf. WERE JWL. 
VCU.-W- 

\ 

i 

-otsKi \ 

IH TOD B0S1 TO EXPLAIN 
THIS S1UFE/ INE. GOT - 
iwoKnm vn rx. to oo / J 



m i 

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(F'fcWWH. J 

i|S^ 


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Tomba Grades Out at AA 

InLastPre-OlympicTest 


U.S. Skater’s Brother Charged 
- - - - - — ■ to Death 


f 


. The Associated Prtsi 

SHEFFIELD LAKE, Ohio — 
Elizabeth Punsalan, an ice dancer 
with the UK team preparing for 
the Olympics amid tlacontroversryr 
involving its figure dealing champs- 
on, Tonya Harding, was to fly to 

Norway on Sunday two days after 
ber father was stabbed to death and 
her brother charged with murder. 

Ernesto Punsalan, 57, was found 
with two stab wounds in his chest, 
the police chief, Thomas Sdnnidt, 
said Saturday. ■ 

Ricardo Punsalan, 20, was nem 
on a charge of aggravat ed mta to 
and was scheduled to be a rra ig n ed 
Monday. Police said the stabtang 
occurred Friday m$M ia tonmsa- 
Ian home in Loram, lO. mBes-VJ 2 
lakxnetas) west of Qew£^, 
Elizabeth . 

compete ta- to' < 8 ymf*c* at the 
urgin&ctf hexfamay. j. • 

“My father was proud oTsg 
skating achievements®® wornfl 
have wanted me to go on toL^ 
hammer," the starter sm4 p wffl 
try to ska* my «*y *** “ 

to memory.'* . ■ . - •,.. . 

. ShotoWOevdandtrimosimv^* 

ft* WEWS that she thought her 


brother had a violent reaction to a 
new medication.' . • • •• 

The devdand flam Dealer re- 
ported in its Sunday, editions that 
the attack occurred a few boors 
after Ricardo Punsalan was re- 
leased from How Center, the. psy- 
chiatric unit of SL JosephUospitaj 
andHeatth Center mLoram. 

" * P. T .k 


cussing whether wcarao runsuau 
had been a patient at Hope patter. 

■ Emcsto Punsalan Jr, the doc- 
tor's ddr^ sail ^ to family was 

itirt prepared to discuss ha i broth* 
e^s medical history. “Maybe m a. 
few days.” he said. “But not now. 

Ernesto Pnnsalau, a surgeon, ap- 
parently was asleep when he was 

staWxd, Sdnnidt said. " 

^^S^^^BOiiaced dead onar- 
tied al.'St JOSe^ Hps^tal and 

TfaTth Centam Laram. Hc^prac- 
■- deed as a surgcoo at Elyria Memo- 
*m HospittuRegional Medical 
Center. 

Kjcardo Punsalan tdd omcosai 
the scene tot he bad stabbed Ins 
father Schmidt said. A tatchen 
knife befieved to be to weapon 
was recovered. 


Schmidt would not comment on 
tomotive, but said tore was not a 
fight. He dedmed to comment on 
whether tore had beat a history ^of 
problems or violence in the family, 

and would not say whether drugs or 
alcohol were involved. 

Theresa Punsalan, 59, to doc- 
tor’s wife, and their son, Robe rt, 
n/ frw> agft was unavailable, were m 
the house at to time of the stab- 
bing. They were not injured, 
Schmidt said. 

Elizabeth. Punsalan, 23, and her 
husband, Jerod Swallow, 27, were 
to skate Friday night m 

Boston aim exhibition with Nancy 
Kenigpn, but their performance 
was canceled.. 

Punsalan and Swallow will rep- 
resent to Doited States in to ice 
dandqg competitor at Lillrfi a m - 
xnerr’. . . 

The couple won to ice dancing 

competition at the UK F igure 
Ska ting Championships in Detroit 

on Jan. 7 after to withdrawal of 

defending champions Renee Roca 
and Gorsha Sur. 

The UK Olympic committee 
said Punsalan and Swallow were 
due to arrive in Oslo with the test of 



Compiled bv Our Staff from Dispatches 

garmisch-partenkir- 

CHEN, Germany — Alberto 
Tomba, getting better as the Win- 
ter Olympics get doser, won the 
last slalom before to L Dl ft hannn er 
Games by more than a second Sun- 
day a head of Tomas Fogdoe. 
the Italian, who led Fogdoe by 

0.72 seconds after to first run, pro- 
duced to third-fasiest second run 
on to Gudiberg course to win to 
eighth slalom of to season and 
post his second victory ® I IW - 
Tomba, who won the Jan. 30 
slalom in Chamonix, France, was 
the only skier to break 46 seconds 
in the 58-gate first run, docking 
45-95. He posted a time of 4652m 
the 62-gate second heat for a win- 
ning aggregate of I minute, 32.47 
seconds. 

-There are still 20 days to go 
before to Olympic slalom and I 
hope 1 can stay m form," Tomba 
said. “I will keep on training hard 
and hope for the best" 

Tomba's fourth slalom victory of 
the season brought his career total 
to 22 , second on to all-time hsi 
Behind Ingpmar Stemnark’s 40. 

His 33 career World Cap vic- 
tories make Tomba the fourth most 
successful World Cup skier. Sten- 
mark has 86 . 

The 100 points Tomba picked 
for his victory moved him to sec- 
ond place overall in World Cup 
standings, and extended his lead m 
slalom standings. 

Fogoe, the Swedish slalom 
World Cup champion last season, 
who also finished second to Tomba 
in Chamonix, posted a time of 
1:3358, 1.11 seconds back. 

Jure Roar of Slovenia, fourth 
after to first nm, moved up one 
place to finish third in 1:34.21 after 
breaking a ski tip on to first run. 

Peter Roth of Germany, w ho had 
the fastest second nm, jumped 

from 10 th to fourth, while his team- 
mate, Aiming Bittner, was fifth. 

Thomas Slangassmger of Aus- 
tria, third after the first run, 

dropped to ninth. . 

Tomba. 27, is to only Alpine 
skier to win consecutive Olympic 
gold medals in the same event, to 
giant slalom in 1988 ^nd l992- He 

also won to slalom title m 1988. 

Tomba feD after crossing the fin- 
ish line, bringing down a mnkedrft 
fence and ending up on his back m 


The Norwegians suffered a set- 
back before the Winter Games in 
their country. 

Fmn-Chiistan Jaaae. to 1992 


Olympic slalom champion, and 
Ole-Christian Furuselb stradcUca 
ga te* and were disqualified, whue 

Overall World Cup leader Kjetfl- 
Andrt Aamodt fell. An their prob- 
lems occurred in to first rum 
“Maybe our guys .already had 
part of their minds m Lilleham- 
mer," said to Norwegian mens 
team's coach, Dieter Bartsch. 

Aamodt still holds a healthy ,lead 
m to overall standings with 1.087 
points. Tomba. who has virtually 
no shot at to overall title because 
he skips to speed races, has 764. 
Patrick Siaub of Switzerland was 


another top-ranked skier who 
failed to finish the first run, while 
Hubert Strolzof Austria fell in to 
second beat. 

Sunday’s slalom was to first 
race in this Bavarian resort. since 
Austrian star Ulrike Maier was 
killed here during a women’s down- 
hill eight days ago. A men s down- 
hill planned for Saturday on to 
same course was called off for safe- 
ty reasons, but the slalom — held 
on a different slope — went ahead. 

Tomba, who also won here last 
season, donated his prize money of 
30,000 marks (S17.000) to a new 
foundation named after Maier to 
help victims of skiing acddaits on 
the World Cup circuit. 

<AP. Reuters) 


German Teenager Wins 
Super-G and Schneider 
Takes World Cup Lead 

. ■ i 


the ice dancers and pairs figure 
skaters on Sunday. 

The USOC sent condolences to 
Punsalan, Swallow and their to- 
ffies, and said to death was fat 
more deeply because of to work 
the skaters had done wih commit- 
tee staff members in Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. 

“It gpes without saying that a 
tragedy that impacts any Olympic 
athlete saddens the Olympfc f wafly 
tremendously,” said a USOC 
spokesman, Mike Moran, who is m 


icuuc an vi wiuuiti -r _j 

■ letially heart-rending because 


IS wti wu ij — a , , 

of what she pasonaDy and wttnher 
husband give back to thrir^sport 
and the Olympic movement." 

Figure skating has four , disci- 
plines: meat’s singles, ladies singles, 
pans and ice dancing. 

Punsalan and Swallow, who hve 
in Pontiac, Mi chig a n , are two-time 
UK Ice Dance Champions for 
1991 and 1994. They were married 
in September. 


but was not injured. 

“I was scared for a moment be- 
cause I have just recovered from an 
imuiy," said Tomba, who won in 
Chamonix despite nursing an in- 
jured shoulder. 

With his performance to last 
two weekends, Tomba hasemerged 

as the heavy favorite for to slalom 

add medal in UHehammer. He has 
not won a giant slalom race tins 
season. 


The Associated Press 

SIERRA NEVADA “ 

Hilde Gerg, at 18 to _ 

team’s youngest member, won her 
first World Cup race Sunday, a 
super-giant slalom, while Vrcm 
Schneider of Switzerland finished 
13th to pick up enough pamtsto 
take the lead in the overall World 
Cup standings away from season- 
long rival Pemflla Wiberg of Swe- 
den. , 

Schnei der's 20 pants gave her a 
total of U 10 . just one ahead of 
Wiberg. Wiberg skied but did not 
earn any points in the supa-G. 

Gerg posted a time of 1:47.80. 
nip ping 18-year-old Isolde Kostner 
of Italy, who was clocked in 
1:48.30. Gerg’s teammate and 
roommate. Katharina Gotensohn, 
was third in 1:48.91. 

The powerful Austrian team did 
not compete in any of the week- 
end’s races because of the death of 

its star, Ulrike Maier. 

StiK Gerg, who became the 
fourth different winner in the four 
super-G races this season, said she 
was shocked by her victory. 

“I can’t bebeve it, she said. “I 

guess I wasn’t too bad. I had a good 

fading because it was a nice day 
but I never dreamed Fd win. 

Gerg, who is in her first full sea- 
son an the circuit, had suffered a 
foot imuiy just before to season 
started. Her previous best in any 
World Cup race was sixth m tne 
super-G in Cortina d’Ampezzo, It- 
aly, last month. 

“We’re leaving right after the 

race, so there’ll be no party. But the 

two of us will have Champagne on 
the plane," Gerg said with a nod 
toward Gutensohn. 


Warwara Zelenskaia of Russia 
was fourth in 1:48.92, with Heidi 


was iomui m i.-™.-— , 

Zurbriggen of Switzerland fifth m 

1:49.03. 0 , , 

Schneider, 29, won Saturday’s 
slalom with a sensational second 
run of 48.88 seconds for a total 
rime of 1:41.30 seconds and her 
49th World Cup victoiy. 

Wiberg was second in 1:42.66. 
with Deborah Compagnoni of Italy 
third in 1 :42.70. 

Schneider was 11th after com- 
pleting the first run in 52.42. 

“In the first run I had too much 
respect for to course, but then I 
saw to others were very much fast- 
er than me," she said. “What I 
started to second run, 1 thought if 
I could lose that much time on to 
fiist, I could make it up. too. I thmk 
this was one of to best races of my 
career. But you shouldnT forget the 
Austrians weren’t here." 

The top three finishers agreed to 
donate their prize money toafom- 
h at inn bring set up in Maiers 
name. Schneider won 58500, Wi- 
berg $4,150 and Compagnoni 

S1.4S0. _ 

It was the 29-year-old 
Schneider’s fifth slalom victoiy tins 
season in right races. She has fin- 
ished second twice. 

“It’s usually said that those who 
do well in to World Cup should do 
well in the Olyngncs. but its very 
different," she said. “The Olympics 

is like starting over again.” 

Roberta Sara of Italy, better 
known for ha risk-taking than her 
successes, was to surorise leader 
after to first leg with a nme or 
5049 on to 497-meter Neveros 
course. But she fell 10 seconds into 
ha second run and was eliminated. 




The Associated Pros 

UUEHAMMER, N«way --- 
Intenuitional Olympfc .Conwjti»e 
officials have agreed »«* 
number erf candidates bHWmgfoi 
to 2002 Winter Olfrppietw a 

group of twow to finaBsts. 

A record 10 dws have 
trfbidsfortoC^Vi^to 

vote set for toKX^s 

executive board doa&ri Saturday 
that to biddiiig_aiidMtoct«mpn>- 
cea would be too oo stiy 
•That are too n»ny caDdl ‘ 

dates," said to IOCstoerta^^ 

end. Francos Canard, 

nKwemeot But on to othatorm. 

it’s extremely 

^ enubdate cities. wiffi to expens* 
* and to loodjrf woik-thatvriu be 
dooem vain. - 


bee; SjOO,SWitzeriHiid;Sodii f Rns- 

na, and Tarviao, Italy. 

Salt Lake was a loser to 
Naaano, Japan, m a dtose vote for 
fiSwr Gaines and is 
viewed as tite favoritfttins ton. 

• A record number of athletes 
and coantries wffl-takepart , in to 
Wmia Games, to IOC said 

The IOC sports director, Gilbert 
Feffi, said that 1,990 alhlrira from 
66 nations had registered for the 

F *TiimSSto record of L871 
. ■ihirtM from 65 omintiteS set at to 
1992 Gamra in Albertville, Rara*- 

• Arne House, ccrn nTWnda rit 
the Olyn^HCprtoe force, satd2,770 
— and mflitary oersound will 


Czechs Win Pre-Games Hockey Title 

finished with 1-2 records. 


BRAZIL 


By John UpiBke. 260pages. $23. 
Alfred A. Knopf. 

Reviewed by 
Micbiko Kakutani 


For the Record 

irM-tnr Gilbert . . , 


’ or ine newnu 

jsffi &'aasa ag^tssiS 

ass 



3veu a plan to sdect two or 

next ytar. ’Hay wffltoAojmWa 

here of to executive bom^^ 
icmseaatativc each of to 
SSjhderatians and mmjJ, 
Olympic cornmitte^, ^ 

Sift of the K)C evataton 
f ^fiSsdectk»wffl be made 

as usual bytofoDIOC- 

wxSnbas of 
boartf vtocoxne-from 
ajumrirawfflbei^^^^ 
part in to pre-sdeewm pm«. . 

group wouM try to 
fionsenswferf on 

araeSsrt to sdect 
the costs 


-'JS wSS'Sm to Houston for Robert Horry, Matt Bttorf 
draft choices; Elliott had struggled since 
and two second-round WA aran^^^ « Rodman prior to 

Wng traded from SmAmomo to Dcttwt for Deoius ^ 

days wore Ifa estin of the G mys- Bnikh Athletic Federation's 

^rftte gi^tttjodcgg. ,6 at the 

AutomcMe M-o- 

of EndBnd won a dote but nmmiiiious tloosoraover 

to retain his WBO s^emnddlew^t 

title in Bolin. * — 1 — 


force, 

than the 


Of UK ”-s 

Ma aa r JISZZa 


vflk, nance. ■ ■ . _ . 

^e cost of the UHetoamon po- 
Bceopaation is about S50 matorc 
Hmse ^d. to po&e will have 


ana rumw irru. iw— 

.. unaato cnnt)» 35 «J^“ 

spend nrillkw of 

4 mm] i rnnvl the WOSW at 

the bids have mge 
dance of success and^e^^^ 

•js?ssa.-® ^ 


Assddt&d Press 

:J3AYTONA^C^-B^ 
—The new btaU-foMaorng Worid 
Sp«ts Cffls were soundly, bemt 
Smidayin to seasooropemng 
iex 24 Hours, a race dominated , by 

ptodnetiootosed cara. - •: - 

Thawinnerinto 2w«g JMy 
at Daytona Intern ational Speed- 
vzay was a GTSsfivioott "Himm 
2X300, co-driven by Paul Gator 
jozzi, Scott Pruett, Butch lot- 
am and Steve Millen. ; 

•gje International MotraSports 
Association had hoped" to rat* 
would »ve its sew open-cockpil 
carsasdidsendoff astosportsor 
body’s MW glamor diviston,rq)hto* 

m« to.i^red OTPwwyp®*-- 
Hbuiwitii attrition tdobg a tnfl on 
to eitfit WSCs tot started m to 


63 <ar firid, the best finish by to 
new twaooncal racers was nmlh. 

Meanwhile, the winning car 
fra^ht off early challenges iron 
another Nissan ZX300 and a 
Porsche 911 Turbo — a LeMans 
division entry —to finish 24 tos 
phis 2 "itnntfs, 23557 seconds 
ahead of another Porsche 91 1 Tor- 
bOi with Bob Wofldc, a four-time 
Daytona winner, and Djmnuqtre 
Diipy combining,' with Jflrgen 
Barth co-dtiving. 

“The car performed flawlessly," 
Geatflozzi said. “1 dart know n 

anybody’s ga» as mmy laps as w: 

did, bul l know they didn't do it 
this easy.” • 

The vwmring ear covered 707 
laps — 2^1652 mfles (4,06852 ki- 
lometers) — on to 3^6-mile road 


w 

course that included two-thirds of 
to 2 %-mile, hirfi-banked oval and 
a narrow, twisting infield section. 
The Nissan, which led the final 14 
hone 'and 25 minutes, averaged 
104.8 miles per boor. 

The fastest of to Porsche^ a 
turbocharged GT1, was me j 
lowing a chase through the dark- 
ness. The car, shared by five-time 
Daytona winner Hurley Haywood, 
fanner Indy 500 winner Danny 
Sullivan and Hans Stock and Wal- 
ter Redd, led «yeral tii^htf me 
succumbing during to 17th hoar 
after a f anbeli broke. 


Hehad to drive to entire i length 
of to track without a cooling fan 
before pitting, fatally damaging to 
engine. 


A DECADE and a half ago, in 
“The Coup" John Updike 
Hied to stretch the bounds of his 
fictional territory by abandoning 
to American suburbs for the wflds 

ofAfrica-IncoigiiriDguptbeimagi- 

aaiy kingdom erf Rush and its ; impe- 
rious leader Colonel Eflritom he cre- 
ated a novel Thai aspired to be born 
a Nabokovian comedy of mannas 
and a wickedly satiric exploration at 
cultural myths. A similar leap of 
imagination seems intended m ms 
la«st novel, “Brazil,” set in a mythi- 
cal version of South America. 

The result this time, however, is a 
deridedly unhappy one. Couched as 
a retelling of the Tristan and Isotit 
wd , “Brazil" begins as an arch 
fairy tale and ends as a modern-day 
soap opera full of racial and sexual 
dkbfc. It does fa racial under- 
stantfing what Updike's tatter por- 
traits of women in “The Witc hes of 
Eastwick” and ~S" did lor commu- 
nication between the sexes 
In Updike's idling, Tnstan is 
TristSo, a 19 -year-old blade street 
kid, who believes in to magical 
workings of fate. Iseult is Isabel .a 
spoiled upper-class wlrite gpV who 
rebels against her famfly^ code of 
privilege. The two teenagos meet 
on the beach in R» dunng the 
1960s and instantly fall in love. 

In typical Romeo and Juhet fash- 
ion, their families denounce the ro- 
mance. IsabeTs wealtipr unde de- 
clares the affair beyond the bounjb 
-even of our permissive age, m tins 
aD-too-progressive society." 

TristSo’s mother, a prosti tute w oo 
has borne numerous ffl«®timate 
chfldren, also rebuffs Isaba s effmTS 
to befriend her. Their respective 
worlds — IsabeTs worid <rf money 
and ease, TnstStfs worid of poverty 
and despair — are mechmicaLiy 
contrasted and compared, when to 

lows ny to start a new hf e on then 

Trirtao will be killed, Is^xi appears 
wndcntiSheWdslwrlovagood- 

byc and enrolls in cdDegri 
It’s not long, however, beiore 
TristSo resurfaces in her hfc, and 
to couple are soon on the nm 
again, liis toe fleemg the to- 
Sot readies of provmaal ^^; 

There, they have a sen« of hanw- 

in g adventures: a fruitless srardi 


for gold in a small minin g commu- 
nity, illness and near starvation m 
to bug-infested rain forests, fright- 
ening encounters with murderous 
Indians and greedy bandits. 

Though there are occasional pas- 
sages that sparkle with Uptakes 
patented gift for to lyrical meta- 
ptav his descriptions of Tristitoand 
Isabel’s adventures often fed forced 
and contrived Kstoxy lessons are 
shoehorned into to nauanre, and 
paragraphs are packed full of undi- 
gested information that appears to 
foe been taken from to books 
Updike says he used as re^an*: 
“Rebellion in to Badlands, by 
Eudides da Cunha; “Tristes Tiopi- 
ques," by Claude Uvi-Stranss; 
^Through to Brazilian Wilder- 
ness," by Theodore Roosevelt; “The 

Masters and to Slaves," by Gtk 
berto Freyre; “Brazil" by Etaabeih 
Bishop and the editor; of Life, and 
two guidebooks to the coanay. 

Iiftasaftaword, Updtoalso 
notes that he took theteneot Bra- 
zfl” from Joseph BMier’s Ro- 
mance of Tristan and Iseult and 
“courage and local color from tray 
Brazilian fiction” of writers like 
dance Lispector, Rubem Fonseca, 
Jorge Amado and Nfchda Pifion. 

Pabaps this heavy rdiance on 
source material for both in?pmtion 
and mood accounis for to oddly 
glU ffyi ]Ti giu y of tins novel, aome- 
thnes to characters sound lto nn- 
nnerants speaking a second lan; 
mSe: "My family warn to part us. 
^^netimes, they sound like bad 


actors speaking dialogue from a 
bad movie: "I am color-blind, like 
our constitution, in tune with the 
national temperament wc inherited 
from the grand-spirited sugar 
planters." 

Sometimes, they sound Iflrc ex- 
iles from a cheap romance novel; ‘ 1 
crave a world in which only you 
exist, all around me, tike the air 1 
am constantly eating." 

To make matters even worse, tne 
characters are defined almost en- 
tirely in terms of the color of their 
skins. Isabel is repeatedly de- 
scribed as to “pale nch girl, this 
platinum grit" the “shining white 
girl.” Tristao. on his pan, is re- 
ferred to by other characters as a 
“black slave,” and a “black buck. 

The dynamic in Isabel and Tns- 
tao's relationship is si m ilarly de- 
fined in terms of odor and race, as is 


to reaction of others to their ro- 
mance. Later in to book, when the 
two of them magically exc h a n ge cot- 
ore through to sorcery of a shaman, 
racial stereotypes proliferate fur- 
ther, and with even less sensitivity or 
insight than in to ridiculous frai 
house movie “Soul Man." 

Tristao develops “to careless 
flatness of a white voice, which 
expects to be listened to" and "that 
confident thin-lipped way of white 
men." As for IsabeL she discovers a 
"new sdT as a black woman, “a 
fresh edge.” 

Such descriptions turn Isabel and 
Tristo into flimsy racial carica- 
tures, and make it impossible for us 
to sympathize with them, or with the 
ugly, repellent novel toy inhabit. 

Michiko Kakutani is on the staff 
of The New York Times. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


• Gottfried Forck, formerly bead 
of to Protestant church in the east- 
on German state of Brandenburg, 
is reading "Wege aus der Not: Der 
Dritte Weir by Klaus M. 
Leisinger. . . 

**Il is important for people m to 
developed countries to know more 
about to problems of the develop- 
ing worid and how we can help 
thfo to create a better environ- 

m6nL (Michael Kallenboch, IHT) 



By Alan Truscott 

T HERE has been only one 
bridge enthusiast in to ranks 
of American Presidents, and that 
was Dwight D. Eisenhower. Presi- 
dent Clinton says that he played m 
college but has been too busy smee. 

This information was fortonm- 
ine last summer when three bridge 
oSyers, Debbie Melnick of Atlan- 
ta. Eleanor Onstotl of New Orleans 

and Eva Scalassa of West Nyj*» 
New York, were viatmg to White 
House nnder the guidance ot 
George McGovern, to former 
Senator from South Dacota. 

Scatasm had a Presidential part- 
ner on to diagramed deal played 
at the end of the Fall National m 
Seattle in November. She was 
West, and the East player was Bar- 
bara Nudelman of Chicago, who 
was concluding a year as president 


of to American Contract Bridge — 

^North-South followed a nonaal l^it*>uldberenMiaitliePrB- 

route to three no-tramp, aud a club idem s Coup. 

was led to to ace. Another club 
went to the king, and the three was 
returned to suggest. some hope of 
regaining the lead in to low-rank- 
ing diamond suit East rose to the 
occasion by discarding her dia- 
mond ace, insuring to defeat of 
to contract. 

Diamonds could now be estab- 
lished without letting West gain the 
lead and defeat the contract with 
two club winners. If East had not 
removed ha diamond ace. South 
would have been able w lead that 
soil twice from the dummy and 
make his game. 

This dramatic discard of a high 
honor to create an enury to part- 
ner’s band is termed the Emperor’s 

Coup. The play is said to have been 


WEST 

• 8742 
OQ 

0 J 10 6 

• K96 4 3 


NORTH (D) 

• A KJ 

O AK432 
0 75 
*Q87 

EAST 

• 653 

0 J 10 8 7 5 
0 ASS 

• A 2 
SOUTH 

♦ Q 10 9 
098 

O KQ942 

* J 10 5 


Both skies were vulnerable. Hie 
bidding: 

North East South 

1 0 Pass 1 N.T. 

2 N.T. Paw . 3 N.T. 

Pass Pass 


West 

Pass 


West ted the dub fair. 






Very Joseph: Totally Cool Shopping 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — He is known, like a sports 
hero or a rock star, by his first name: 
Joseph. The word has even entered the 


to fashion s cognoscenti an any space, 
cool in both senses of the word. It win be 
filled with graphic modem clothes, mostly 
in blade and white like the wardrobe of the 
impish man himself. 

Joseph Ettedgui — to give him the name 
he inherited from his Moroccan-French 
parents — came to London 27 yeare ago, 

went into hairdressing, offered his clients a 
few clothes (inevitably in black and white) 
and from there built an empire of style. 

You only have to peek into the tiny cafe 
in the flagship store Joseph opened three 
months ago on the Avenue Montaigne, to 


An occasional series 

ahnuf people for whom 

style is a way of life I LC3- 

know that you are at modern fashion's 
pulse beat The people who sit there — 
designer Michel Klein uses it as his can- 
teen — look like they walked out of his 
stylish (black and white) catalogue. Would 
anyone dare to walk into the store in a 
shocking pink jacket or the wrong red 
shoes? 

“ft is not at a II like that — l want a 
background of black and white but 1 love 
to see red in the middle of it," says Joseph, 
to refute accusations that his style focus 
encourages fashion fascism. “I like to mix 
the sublime and the cheap, toput drill with 
cashmere. But to do a shop, discipline is 


very important. 

You find the 1 1 Joseph stores in Paris, 
London and New York, plus Cannes, in 
the south of France. The style he pioneer- 
ed has spread like ectoplasm across the 
fashion universe — all large plate glass 
windows revealing neatly folded clothes 
against matt-gray walls and gleaming 
floors. 

It is hard to separate the reality of 
Joseph's achievement as tastemaker and 
style-setter from the myth. He contributes 
to the legendary accounts of his pursuit of 
retailing perfection by idling a story about 
hims elf: When Donna Karan asked him to 
lunch in the London store Harvey Nichols 
(where be designed the cafe) Joseph dedi- 
cated the morning to rearranging the stock 
in his shop, changing the music tapes, 
freshening up the dowers and “taking 
away the dotbes 1 didn’t think Donna 
would like.” She greeted him by telling 
him she adored his shop — which she had 
visited the day before. 



Joseph Ettedgui: A fondness for blade and white. 


Joseph’s exceptional place in the fash- 
ion world comes from keeping one eye on 
emerging talent and the other on customer 
needs. The designers be has picked up at 
their modest beginnings include Kenzo — 
whom he made a fashion star in London in 
the !970s — and Azzedine Alala. whose 
talent be nurtures with fanatical loyalty. 

“1 love to work with people who give me 
ail the ingredients,” says Joseph, who finds 
it easiest to buy from designers he knows 
personally. He describes the rare moments 
of parting company (he recently fell out 
with Kenzo's organization) as “Kke a di- 
vorce.” 

At 55, Joseph continues to add to his 


designer famOy. bringing in Helmut Lang, 
Ann Demeulemeester and Martin Mar- 
giela, just as he once supported the avant- 
garde Japanese designers after a visit to 
Tokyo in the early 1980s, which he de- 
scribes as a seminal moment. 

“It was the architecture — and seeing 
how far they wait to make a s t a t ement of 
the clothes with the shop fittings,” he says. 
“I learned to respect the work of the Japa- 
nese designers, how conscientious they 
were — even a bit too serious. It also made 
me realize how pure was black. I started 
wearing it because I am quite shy and I 
disappeared in black. Then in Europe, 
black became very fashionable and even a 


Corbusier black chair became a monster 
because there were so many rip-offs. So I 
immediately decided to wear white!” 

The Avenue Montaigne store (“my hid- 
den dream”) and the Loudon flagship on 
Fulham Road are Jofty temples to designer 
clothes. But Joseph's strength lies also in 
the collections of simple knitwear and 
rlnriiing d esig ned to TCSpOUd to hi$ Clients’ 
needs. 

“So many people pay attention to the 
biglabds and what is gang to impress, but 
the bread and butter is a cheap let-down,” 

he says. “I give much more attention to the 

gray flannel trousers, the plain sweater 

and the good raincoat that people wear all 
the time and I display diem with the same 
respect as the designer clothes." 

Ah, the display! Somehow Joseph has 
succeeded in creating m the diiDy vrodd of 
modem retailing stores with a sooL Itmay 
be just the bowl of white tulips in a glass 
vase with crystal-dear water that you 
know a hapless assistant must ch an ge 
twice a day. Or the eclectic and stylish 
objects: Horst’s classic fashion photo- 
graphs sleekly burned; a splash of paint- 
box color for the home wares that have 
been part of the stock since Joseph opened 
Pour la Maison in London in 1985. He 
says that he and his wife Isabel have a 
horror of minimalist fashion stares with- 
out a human touch. 

Joseph's critics accuse him of elevating 
ordinary thing s — stone- washed silk shirts 
or day-gray knits — to fancy status with 
fancier paces. Enshrining objects you 
might find elsewhere if you had the tune 
and taste is often the point. But in a 
business known for bitchy rivalry, Jo- 
seph’s viators’ book (another at-home 
touch) contains generous co mmen ts from 
competing retailers who stopped by to 
check out the store. 

By the time they have absorbed bis 
latest ideas, he win probably have moved 
on. There is a restless chmgmg round of 
stock and even decor — one London shop 
went from high tech to new brutalism in 
six months. Joseph's earliest memories as a 
child in fj«flhhinpa are of his grandmoth- 
er, “an extraordinary eccentric," poshing 
furniture from room to room aauss the. 
speckled marbled floor with its mosaic 
border. 

Joseph's father was a furnishings retail- 
er, ana quirky echoes of Morocco come in 
whimsical furniture displayed fike art ob- 
jects in the Paris store. 

“I remember gang into Dean and De- 
luca [the Manhattan deli] and s ee i n g the 
eyes of people shining when they saw let- 
tuce or cheesecake and chocolate cake," 
says Joseph. “In my shops, I want to get 
that look back.” 


LANGUAGE 


On the Horns of a Dilemma 

. By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON —Toward the end of “Meet the l, or, if referring to a specific state. sexuaSy 

Press,” where I occasionally con* an to shoot _ 

the waonded, we wae disensang ‘Whhewatergaie. Rdatedly. the wotApena 

n » «.•« « ‘ r f iV ’ *rw r r * ’ n • u _ » ' ■ / rt r _ m 1 aAnn TmT 


my suspicions O f heav y financial 
you told me that Bffl Gintoo was very horny or very 
ambitious,” Broder opined over the NBC network, I 
would have no trouble believing it If yon told me that 
he was mooey-hungry and was cutting corners for 
money, Td say that doesn’t sound Kke the B31 Clint on 
I know” ... 

When die show ended, the pifflacr Prize-winning 


aslced: “Can you use a word like horny on television?” 
The only answer was yes, because he already had-But 
has homy crossed the Kne from slang to colloquialis m . 
f rom mud vulgarity to acceptable informal usage? 

Host, to the roots. Horn can be traced to die Latin . 
cornu. The proto-Geamanic htgna bloomed in Old 
EpgKsh, in “Beowulf” around the year 725. The 
original mea ni ng id er r ed to the hard protuberances 


yjS52SSSS3=SB=g 

Stan only recently apFgpsSiri 

writer didn’t need 

rhf papa- 12 times tn die opening weds of tta yea; 
compared with no uses in the same jniod ^yeat 

. Once more unto the breach, dear frif gds Ba^ qe I 

«rnn«i he 'sure that this tracer separating aanHriraxfram 


re creatures Kke thesaryr, a bestial being combining a 
goat (undeservedly vilified as a lecherous beast) and a 
nmnari Thepoet James Rnssdl LowdL extdBmg the 
virtues of bard wok, wrote in 1843:; “Blessed are the 
homy hands of tofl!” Hard-working fishermen today 
prize as bait the North American homvhead chub. 

Nowlo the point A bom is hard; it is shaft-shaped; 
since the 15th century, it has been used as a symbol for 
the mate's erect sex organ. “No horn could be suffer.” 
John defend wrote in “Fanny HIT* in 1749; earher, 
Shakespeare used die term hom-mad in “Much Ado 
Abocu Notiimg” and other plays to mean both “techer- 
ous” and “cuckolded.” The Dose“hom” of the rhinocer- 
os has kragbera believed to possess aphrodisiac quali- 
ties, winch led to the cad an germed of toe specks. 

“Home is an 18th-century Scottish term, for ‘dew- 
il' " tepom Man mthar Ibe i993 JX^o- 

naiy of Sexual Sang, “winch itself is another old term 
for penis, dating back to Boccaccio. Robert Bums 
refers to add hornie, meaning toe devil, and old homy 
is also a I9tb-centmy term for penis. But plain- old 


godliness is going tomakciUhrougn 
Soo-bqys, and tnt-tuts that are part of ^ne -eating 
process," I night asweffgoaB the way. Bete aoaes 
mere than yta need to know ab^ toe part otme body 
that dating novelists used to refer to as Tus madtoodf 
The word pans, according to toe Bambart Dicdo- 
nary of JEtymology, is from toe Latin news te “SuT 
and is cognate with the Gteekpetx and SassstaApnas, 
from toe hxdo^arc^ean pes-/pos-. __ . ■; 

Perns surfaced two years ago in car hying rooms in 
thffniwaicelTKgnas heatings (humgArnr aHar iittai- 
nxxiy, winch also necessitated _ 

statetnen tdefeDdmg Mmarif from charges of chfld mo- 
lestation, and became part of fife's daily language in the 

avid coverage of Lorena Bobbitt’s triaL Dent blame the 


“Sexus," turned it into an e^uaLogpoiiiriity word 
with “Her thick, gurgling voice saying [raunchy bit 
deleted] Tm homy.’ ” 

□ .. . 

Thai brings us to today: Do we use homy in every- 
day speech, along with its Scottish synonym randy, to 
mean “sexually aroused?? Yes; it's common usage, 
and it has lost mochxjf its taboo. 

Next question: Should we use rite term in farmer 
newspapers a on television talk shows? In my cpia- 
ion. no; common usage is not necessarily good usage, 
and homy has not lost all its taboo. My coBea^e 
Broder «mght bimgrif, jnd aAnd about it- What is 
tmtimil in dramatic Aialng ne can be jarring in more 
formal discourse. 

Instead of “if you told me he was horny, "try “if you 
told me he played around a lot." (In formal newspaper 
writing, of course, you could not use play around. 


what happened was “she cut off his penis”; only or 
second reference could it Be “an act ca sexual nmtQa- 
-tiori” or “her attempt to remove his manhood.” 

We have come a long way far a short time, thanks, to . 
television, in removing a sense of shame in using toe 
right word- Time was, a few courageous parenls wouH 
eschew all baby-talk term* and accurately identify the 
part tn their children, only to Mush furiously whan their 
Eds freely used, toe “dimcal” word to other adults. 

We’ve come a ways in jour nalism , too. In a new 
book, “My limes,” John Cccry wrote about a New 
York Times article on the subject of sex: “It had been 
derided that my story cooldremain as it was except for . 
one word. That was penis. Vagina was acceptable, but 
pans had to be replaced by ‘male sex organ.’ ” 

The times, they are a-changin*. July 13,. 1993, wffl be 
remembered astoe day the word pads appeared in 30- 
point type in The New York Tunes. 

Standard FrigHsh has no dirty words. The word 
penis — severed or reattachcd/flaxxad or erect— is as 
mnocenV&nd as usable in poKte company. as toe 
homyhead chub. ... 

New York Times Sendee ■ 


INTERNAHOm 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page 12 ' 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Today 

High Low 
OF OF 

14.57 8*46 

5/41 107 

l/3« 

13/55 0/46 

W*a 6*3 
6/41 2,05 

409 U 34 

4 .-M I 14 
4 ST 0 32 
3 OT T «4 
14.57 6 M 6 

0/46 002 

7.44 307 

9.48 5 M 1 

307 |/ 3 « 

409 O/JZ 
-lOI -11/11 
12/53 6 M 3 
22/71 14/57 
12*1 ?<44 

7/44 are 

9/46 104 

7/44 307 

- 12/11 -ZI /6 
419 1 /** 

>1152 409 

<■■ 2 * -10715 

12.53 7/44 

7/44 205 

205 - 1/31 
J« 0/32 
11/55 5/41 

j «,-&.• ■ i4.7 
205 - 4/25 

*T 9 104 

- 1/31 -II >13 
7-44 403 

6 / 4 J i -9 
104 2>?9 

4.09 1.34 


Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. 


I UK W 
OF 

9/4B > 
307 s 
•1/31 1 
7/44 pc 
5/41 pc 
2. 00 r 
-1/31 7 
IO« s 

200 91 

-lOI an 
9/46 % 
206 sn 
409 pc 

205 3h 
-2/20 C 
-2.29 C 

-W71S pc 
307 J 
16-61 c 

9/46 t 
4/39 pc 
104 pc 
002 Sll 

-130 s 

-2 Cl r 

206 ah 
-6C2 91 

e/43 pc 
205 5 

■307 ar 
-2/29 91 
205 I 
-130 * 
-4.25 91 
-2/29 «n 
■9/18 pc 
2/35 r 
-lOI r 
-4/25 91 
2,29 an 



JUisncuMbir 

ICoU 


i LkKMaanab/y 
Hoc 


North America 

Snow is Beaty from Chicago 
» Detroit Tuesday and agam 
lata Wednesday. Snow is 
possible in New York Ciry 
la® Tuesday. wWa rain wli 
fall In Washington. D.C. A 
major storm a likely in die 
Northeast Thursday, bringing 
rain, ice and snow lo New 
York and rain to Baffimore. 


Europe 

Cold weather will persist 
over ScancfcwvM with snow 
in Lflehammer England and 
northern France to western 
Germany wdl have showers 
mainly Tuesday Into Wed- 
nesday. wind and ohowers 
will hll the Mediterranean 
borderlands. Pry weather wd 
return by Wednesday m Por- 
tugal and Span. 


Asia 

A storm bringing rain then 
Gnow and cold we a th e r will 
hit Korea Tuesday into 
Wednesday. This storm wfll 
bring rainy, wtody weather to 
most at Japan: the far north 
wa he sner/y. Shanghai and 
Be^ng wd turn ad dry Tues- 
day. In Hong Kong, (here wd 
be a few rainy speOs m the 


Bang).* 
Hong Kong 


OF OF 
33/91 27/BO 
12/53 1/34 

19/86 14/57 
33/91 21/70 
27/80 12*3 
9/48 -2/29 
12/53 4/39 

aw Be 25/77 
21/70 14/57 
3M8 -2/29 


Mpe* 14/57 

Caps Toam 25/77 

Casauanea 14«7 

Harare 34/75 

Lagos 31*8 

Naaota 26/79 

Tim 15/59 


11/52 Sh MC 7 7/44 pc 
1 SC 1 a 26/79 17*2 ( 
6*48 91 18*4 8/46 a 

3/37 • 27*0 7 / 4 * t 
26/79 pc 32*9 28/79 pc 
10*0 C 29*4 14*7 a 
7/44 pc 14*7 3/37 PC 


North America 

A/diraage 2*6 4 


Middle East 


iflgh lew w M£i lew W 
C/F C/F C/F C/F OF OF OF OF 

B 8 / 1 U 1 20*8 12*3 s 18*4 12*3 pc Buenos tees 32*9 16*4 pc 32*9 19*6 I 

Coco 23/73 8/46 5 21/70 10/50 S Caracas 28*2 23/73 pc 2 B *2 23 /T 3 pc 

CteniKCiB 18*4 0/43 -j 14*7 6-43 & Lana 26/79 20*8 pc 26/79 2170 c 

Jonratem 17*2 9*48 5 14*7 9/48 i MancaCIy 23/73 10*0 t 22 m 9«48 s 

Lun» 31*8 8/40 S 28*2 8/46 s IfcOOBjaneni 28*2 22/71 pc 28*2 2373 1 

HyarHi 23/79 8/48 a 26.79 13*5 S Saneago 31*3 11*2 a 31*8 12/53 C 

Lagond: s-sunny. pc 9 »*y cfcudy. e<taudy. s 7 rW»w« 5 . r-tnundantnms. r-rapi. 8 fr 5 nm» flumes, 
sn^now. i-lce. W-W«e 8 w. All naps. Io ucm b and data provided by Accu-Wowther, toe . « 1994 


23/73 12*3 S 22/71 15*9 pc 
28*1 22 71 PC 28*2 22.71 »> 


Latin America 

Teeay Tawi a i u w 

Hgh Ura W Mgh Low W 
OF OF OF OF 
Buenos tees 32*9 16*4 pc 32*9 19*6 I 

Cw** 28*2 23^3 pc 28*2 23/73 pc 

Lana 26/79 20*8 pc 2678 21.70 c 

UmajOy 23/73 10*50 S 22/71 9«4 S 

FfcOdBjanera 28*2 2271 pc 28*2 2373 1 

31*3 11*2 a 31*8 12*3 C 


: - 3 or - 14 /r pe 
18*4 11*2 c 
; 2 C 9 - 7/20 pc 
- 4 / 2 S - 7/20 W 1 
1/34 - 16/4 c 
■020 -M 2 an 
27.B0 18/66 pc 
: 28/79 18*1 ah 
i 14/57 7/44 pc 

30*8 21/70 pe 
- 14/7 - 20 /-l HI 
• 11/13 - 20-3 pc 
38*2 21/70 pe 
: 1*> -2C8 hi 
18*4 3.37 c 
12*3 2 /as pc 
- 1/31 - 7'20 s 
*22 - 11/13 e 
80 104 c 


i Wealthy person 
s Takes 
advantage ot 
9 "The 

Forsyte — — ' 

13 Likeness 
15 Kind of stick 
is Sberifl Tupper 
ol ‘Murder, She 
Wrote" 

17 Social hangout 
isSeaswaHow 
20 Home turnover 


M Knock out ol 
kilter 

23 INuminated 
*4 Terminator 
as Bear up there 
as Steep slope 

23 Crier of Greek 
v myth • 

33 Wakens . 

3i Bettor's 
challenge 

<3 Show fright 
4« Weird 


Solution to Puzrie of Feb. 4 


QHHQniUQH SEJOEiaB 
□QansaHa laaaaas 
sanoianEDa nnsaias 
□□□ □□□□□□□ □□□ 
□□ns □□□□[! anna 

□QQOSaSQQ □□□□□ 
aas aaanaaai3 
□□□□□an uaaaaaa 
□asmsoas □□□ 
□anaa □□□□□□□□□ 
□□□□ aHaaB aaaa 

□□□ □□BBQQED HOB 

□□□□□a □□□□□□□□ 

□UBQEJQ □□□□□□□□ 
HLIQQUS □□□□□□□□ 


45 Followed orders 

4SN.Y. Police 

4* Exodus priest 
saMauna— - 

55 Responded 
unintelligibly 
8S 'Last stop! , _ 

sa Abner's pal and 
namesakes 
B3 Diamondcoup 
ss Relative erf the 
flute 

S7 Auction actions 
sa Indian boat 
os Part of 
Halloween 
makeup 

70 Church nook 

71 Endure 


1 informal 
greetings 

2 Eastern V.I.P. 

3 Wind 
instrument? 

4 They ’ll be 
hunted in Apiti 

s Big sports news 

s Loudly weep 


T'HoJymotyT 
. aKindollosar 
B Beelzebub 
toChange 

11 Watkins Glen, 

12 "Lou Grant* star 
14 Lod airport . . 

arirrui ' 
ia Nobetat Wiese) 
22 Esteem 
- 2 S German ink *■ 
as Kind of squad 
27 Lemonlike 
aa Singer Lane . 
SOCuamo'E . 

predecessor 
31 Sonof Prince . 

Valiant 
st Australian 
hopper 

34 Long (stand • 

. town . . , 
as Tool storage 
• area • 

37 LJmerickslte . .. 

38 Barber's cut 

40 Wane 

41 Bu Bring shout 

42 Receive 
4a Pass 

47 Cabbage Patch- 
. Item 


« New York Times Edited by Wilt Shorty 



• Visibly happy 
3fl Caribbean 

getaway 

51 ' has it..." 

32 Start 


54 Actor Guinness 
ss Old lab burner 
svTrapdoor 

52 Milky gem 
•eArmborie 


ci Pueblo town 

54 Employee card 
and others 

ss Still and all 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


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COUNTRY ACCE^ NUMBER COUNUIY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUSrtBER 

ASlA/PACmC Bongary* 0M QMU11 Orfl^ ~ 

0014-081-011 tcdandu _ 99M01 CoE5h “ oa/Mt^vno 

10811 rgoogjHgo r — ~^rrrr- 

522 g ^ 872 W_ __ _ 172-iou . : i^ a d 0 e — 

800,1111 1 Je efateassein» 15*00-11 HSahradnrti 

222 iH mss S rawr -" '■ ' — — s 

ten Q^ill Mahar deotwom . — — 

Kofa 009-11 Monaco* 19a-0011 . “* ; — ; — IS 

KmraAA 11 “ Netber ian dar 0&OZ2-9IU ^ 8tXM63 ^ 40 

Mateyahr 8000011 Norway* eoo-WO-ll 17* 

New Zealand 000-911 TWaar*-,” - ] OAOlO^Fm- orTT .S°£5K. lOg 

PMibPtoea* 105-11 PortngaT SSniaSi - gaa> J ' " ' : 1 ' IW-- 

** *o*~(Mos oo w) 155-5042 Bomaoia 01-8004288 ■^ gfcgpe *5& " 

Solpan- 235-2872 SSSSST 1 _ 00-42000101 - tJrogua y - 00 0410 

s »»te apw NOOOIll-lli Spain ” 900-99-00-n VaaeMds** . 8»Qll-i20 

W^nka 430-450 Sweden* 020-79*611 CAammAM 

Taiwan* 0080-10288-0 S w laerha d* IfS-CO-ll j teh a mas -• ijQgggjgp 

Thailand* - 0019^91-1111 UK. OyXWQQn - Bennudx* . ■ J-80O87^-2 ffil 

BJHOPE BOMMEEASr 'BUdshVi. 1-800^72-2881-, : 

Armenia!** 8*14111 Bahrain ' ' 800001 Cayma n [elands 1 - 800 - 872 -TRRi 

Aaatria**- 0Z2-903-0U ' ggypffCriro) ; 5100200 . Oenadg* - • • • » ■ l^QQ^^T 

0*8-11-0010 tod - 177-1003727 Hate* - . -OOi-aiO mz-^ mS 

Huif?ara 00-1800-0010 Kuwait ’ 800-288 ^tadoF . 'iunuA.mi -: 

Croabr* 99-384)011 Ld»anoa(Bdna) 426jw wetb-Antfl ooi-nmurr£^T 

Cyptue 0H0-9001O SaudlAnbb 1-800-100 ■S-KhWNevfa “'ijmjrn.W' 

CaecfaBep 00-920-00101 Ttah wf... 00000-12277 ‘.- : 

8001*0010 AMERICAS . Gabon* r 

Rnlaod ~ 9WXH0O-10 /jBenteOF ~~ Ml-800.200lm -~~r 

gfegn Bdte* Kfflya* n^v 

Germany 01300010 Bolivia* OjOMl ll »^ Tr U .. ,■ 

Sreecg ‘ 00*800-1311 Brut g ~ 7 ~ . - OOO^MQ Wbtf- . ' 7 ^ 7 ^ . 

I01-1992i.:- 

ABn-ejbvCAii>«Hij>^ljNcinjn,.unBic.ncrniBiUCaaaKr*. > s.'nlnr **^nuk-iidiMriiuinrv 3 ,nk m . ' • . ‘ 

|X-nnli>iiw]9»giniuavciflbn1uikiwnn«M-rinn'Si r niiMm rarinKra -r-rA-rfi-ire... ..i • 7 1 


0014-881-011 TcdaraJn 
10821 Ireland 
018-872 Italy* 

800-2111 Ilft-6re« a °fri - 
000-117 1 am«nta. 

00-801-10 luxemhourg 

0039-111 Maha* 

009-11 M/>— 

1]] Nctbc/Luafa* 

800-0011 Norway* 
00 0-911 ToJaaT***. 
103-11 PortngaT ~ 

155-5042 »n ra .n h 
235-2872 StovaMa ~~ 

HOOOl 11-111 Spain 


Haaste^Mosopw) 153^042 Son 

Saipan' 235-2872 Stow 

Singapore HOOOIH-HI Spalr 

Sri Lanka 430-430 Sweden* 

Taiwan* 0080-102884) ft tefag 

Thailand* - 0019^91-Hll UK. 

EUROPE 


Armenia** 

Aimiia**** 

Rdjuum* 

jiulgam 

CroatfcCF 

Cyptus* 

Catch Bcp 

Denmark* 

Finland* 

France 

Germany 

Gree c e* 


8414111 Bahrain ' 

022-903-011 ‘ Egypt* (Qd«>) 

078-11-0010 toad - 

OO-lrtXHMlO Kuwait 

99-384KU1 ldjanon(Bdna) 
QBQ-90010 Scud Arabia ' . . 
0042000101 TprteT- 

80010010 ’ Aftflgg 

9800-100-10 Argentina* 
19*0011 BeBze* . 

0130-0010 Bolivia* 

00000-1311 Brazfl 


a . , 980-110010 

-114 

L_ j ■ -119 

- 190 . 

_ - '■ • . 190 - 

165 

g_ ~ 123 ' 

950004634240 
<M*o*gna) 174- 


JWOragnaq i MMgnaJ 174 

Fananan ins 

'*** : " : • .i«: 

Surmame • - - J5A 

TT 000410 
Venezuela** . 8froi 1-120 

CAgrawpam 

~ • 1000073-2881 

■Bemmda* . J-aoqfl7^2a8l 

■BltiiShVX 1-800-877- 7881 

Cayman Isianife l-«XL 87 a^«n. 

; 1000072-28^ 
-0&1O0QO7Z.3HM 
teior ~ . oMum.w 

NeULAntfl 001-800Q72-288 1 
■ &- Kma/wevts l-aQtL872-288l 
AHOCA ^ 
Gabon* • OOt-OOP 

OOTir 
OBO Q.IO: 

^ T9T-79* 


Gabon* 


iuarLjan):(-iTui>«HiJ>AjMcnjn,.unBic>ncrniBiUCaaaKr*6vn1nr . 

rerm.,iiaiir> BiL\iuiq>citBgplKT»mura.B:ifam'3in*acta,/qff toroe . •‘tiMRKtoguto 1 

4fvy*?5^ * ,t * ,T * f 4* atlt >*wa6>iiw MCbaa6PT4 ^lftiWiwfc-h-/.^ rr - ni , iii ‘ • 

^ftTWiiiifalCganrar Ir»titol6kwc ♦ tnmnjfrh wrr»*#i ti* u/nteCT**, - 

/•VtT W nrfdfa n w w i< a>h cpo,x»jn6»i • Mm waited brt 

-Ittr IVDmr M6Ri,j1-^l^lni,4ilir,ivak«MAur AAFCwioliHw. 

libliillUMlll *********** t«a Qu.-. 
IminurTjwIkt i. . • . WtofWMiSdSfln— Mt 


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